Tax Day Bill Whittle

As always, correct.

There are benefits that Bill doesn’t go into as well, such as much less lobbying, and so forth. Unfortunately they make it unlikely to pass Congress, let alone the executive branch. But it is a very good idea.

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Cliven Bundy and Brendan Eich

Compass_integrityI’m referencing two articles today, on two seemingly different subjects. But are they? If you read these two outstanding articles, I’ll think you will agree they are two facets of the same subject. That subject is the integrity of a man (or woman). These are both heroes for our time.

Cliven Bundy managed to stare down the Bureau of Land Management, for now. The best summary of this I’ve seen is from John Hinderaker of Powerline, here’s bit of it:

Why You Should Be Sympathetic Toward Cliven Bundy

On Saturday, I wrote about the standoff at Bundy Ranch. That post drew a remarkable amount of traffic, even though, as I wrote then, I had not quite decided what to make of the story. Since then, I have continued to study the facts and have drawn some conclusions. Here they are.

First, it must be admitted that legally, Bundy doesn’t have a leg to stand on. The Bureau of Land Management has been charging him grazing fees since the early 1990s, which he has refused to pay. Further, BLM has issued orders limiting the area on which Bundy’s cows can graze and the number that can graze, and Bundy has ignored those directives. As a result, BLM has sued Bundy twice in federal court, and won both cases. In the second, more recent action, Bundy’s defense is that the federal government doesn’t own the land in question and therefore has no authority to regulate grazing. That simply isn’t right; the land, like most of Nevada, is federally owned. Bundy is representing himself, of necessity: no lawyer could make that argument.

That being the case, why does Bundy deserve our sympathy? To begin with, his family has been ranching on the acres at issue since the late 19th century. They and other settlers were induced to come to Nevada in part by the federal government’s promise that they would be able to graze their cattle on adjacent government-owned land. For many years they did so, with no limitations or fees. The Bundy family was ranching in southern Nevada long before the BLM came into existence.

via Why You Should Be Sympathetic Toward Cliven Bundy | Power Line.

As near as I can tell Mr. Hinderaker has it about right. There is no way that Bundy is going to win in court, it’s going to cost him at least money and likely his way of life, and could cost him his freedom as well. I do sympathize with him, not least because I’m rather the same sort of hard-boiled, do the right thing sort of guy myself. Good Luck to him, and I’m afraid he’ll need it.

But there is also this, long ago, the Reverend Doctor Martin Luther King, in his Letter from the Birmingham Jail, said this:

There are just laws and there are unjust laws. I would agree with St. Augustine that an unjust law is no law at all… One who breaks an unjust law must do it openly, lovingly…I submit that an individual who breaks a law that conscience tells him is unjust, and willingly accepts the penalty by staying in jail to arouse the conscience of the community over its injustice, is in reality expressing the very highest respect for law.

Then there is the case of Brendan Eich, the former CEO of Mozilla, who was forced to step down because he would not recant his opposition to same-sex marriage. Mollie Hemingway wrote an outstanding article the other day in The Federalist on this story. And here is a piece of that article as well.

The Rise Of The Same-Sex Marriage Dissidents

[...]

At the end of the day, they’re all wrong. Or at least not even close to understanding the problem with Eich’s firing. Political differences with CEOs, even deep political differences, are something adults handle all the time. Most of us know that what happened held much more significance than anodyne market forces having their way. And Eich shouldn’t be protected on the grounds that one has the right to be wrong. See, Eich wasn’t hounded out of corporate life because he was wrong. He was hounded out of corporate life because he was right. His message strikes at the root of a popular but deeply flawed ideology that can not tolerate dissent.

What we have in Eich is the powerful story of a dissident.

And what we have in Eich is the powerful story of a dissident — one that forces those of us who are still capable of it to pause and think deeply on changing marriage laws and a free society.

via The Rise Of The Same-Sex Marriage Dissidents

Are you starting to see the parallels here? These are both men of conviction, doing what they think is right. And they are willing to pay the price that goes with standing up to be counted as men of conviction and integrity. We shouldn’t be hounding these men, Like Dr. King, these men should be heroes for out time, spoken of with, if not awe, with respect.

St. Augustine also said this:

Hope has two beautiful daughters.

Their names are anger and courage; anger at the way things are, and courage to see that they do not remain the way they are.

 

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Disarming the Warriors

As usual, Bill Whittle nails it

Nothing to add-nothing to subtract.

Palm Sunday

And so it is Palm Sunday, the day of our Lord’s triumph. We all know the story. I have a serious article up about it this morning at Jess’ All Along the Watchtower, but I wanted something here as well. I suddenly realized the other day that I hadn’t heard this in years. I loved Jesus Christ, Superstar back in the day when I was in college, and you know, it holds up fairly well still.

The theology may be a bit suspect, but I like to think of this as a Passion play for our time.

Enjoy.

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Bundy Ranch vs. Bureau of Land Management

Yes, I have been avoiding this story, because I have no idea who originally was in the right (or wrong) here, and further I’m not sure anybody else does either. Makes it really hard to write an interesting story. But the whole thing seems to have simmered down, at least for now. But it’s been a scary and proud week in America.

The parallels to Waco and Ruby Ridge are much too clear, and they lead to one clear conclusion. The internet is critical to freedom, 20 years ago by the time the news of this dispute got out, it would have been over, and likely with dead bodies to mourn, that’s what happened then, and that’s what would have happened now, except for the alternative media with an occasional assist from Fox News.

That my friends, is why the first amendment is so important, and also a warning to the government. It is when I decided that in my mind that the rights and wrongs could be sorted out later was when the BLM decided that they could restrict freedom of speech.

And even tried to impose restrictions on that. As John Hinderaker of Powerline reminds us, there is only one allowable first amendment area in America, and this is it:

And for me that is when the facts of the case became less important. Nothing in America is more important than the government attempting to infringe Constitutional rights, and apparently I wasn’t the only one to feel that way. That was when you started to see the protests turn into a (legally) armed camp, and that is why the second amendment rights are so jealously guarded by the American people. Long ago, the first of America’s wars started when a silversmith rode through the night, shouting “The regulars are out”. And they were out to confiscate weapons. None of us have forgotten what the North ministry tried, and we pretty much all agree, Not on our watch. In the last analysis, it comes down to this:

And that is why America is different. Here The people are sovereign, and every once in a while we decide to remind the government when they get too overbearing. America is a tense place these days, we have an administration that thinks we should be like Europe, and a large part of the people are saying, rather loudly, NO!

Dan miller had the best general write-up of the whole thing that I have seen, here is his article.

Bundy Ranch: the “truth” shall make you . . . ?

The reports, such as they are, from the Bundy Ranch have been confusing. The Feds have contributed to the dearth of verifiable information, suggesting that there are things it would be inconvenient for us to know.

I don’t know what’s happening at the Bundy Ranch because, aside from conservative bloggers and occasionally Fox News, there is very little information, verifiable or otherwise. According to Mr. Bundy, on Friday he

barely recognized the land during an airplane flyover earlier in the day.

“I flew down along the river here, and I’d seen a little herd of cows,” he told a gathering of supporters. “Baby cows. They was grazing on their meadow and they was really quite happy.

“I then flew up the river here up to Flat Top Mason, and all of a sudden, there’s an army up there. A compound. Probably close to a hundred vehicles and gates all around and vehicles with armed soldiers in them. [Emphasis added.]

“Then I’m wondering where I am. I’m not in Afghanistan. I think I’m in Nevada. But I’m not sure right now,” he said to applause and defiant shouts.

Federal officials said that BLM enforcement agents were dispatched in response to statements Bundy made which they perceived as threats.

“When threats are made that could jeopardize the safety of the American people, the contractors and our personnel; we have the responsibility to provide law enforcement to account for their safety,” National Park Service spokeswoman Christie Vanover said to reporters Sunday.

A good collection of links is available at Nebraska Attitude.

via Bundy Ranch: the “truth” shall make you . . . ? | danmillerinpanama.

And so it has settled down, for now, anyway, latest reports say that the cattle have been released, except presumably for the calves that were reportedly run to death by the BLMs low flying helicopters, and after a week, in which that oldest of American peace officers, the Sheriff, which my historically minded readers will remember derived from the Anglo-Saxon Shire Reeve managed to negotiate a truce.

And again the people back down the government, and that’s what happened in America this week

This is my nominee for picture of the week

If you can’t tell, that the BLM force surrounded by the protesters. I’m also fond of this one which looks like America to me.

 

More here:

  1. http://www.powerlineblog.com/archives/2014/04/standoff-at-bundy-ranch-ends-with-photo-of-the-year-so-far.php
  2. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2603026/Senator-speaks-favor-Nevada-rancher-militias-join-battle-federal-agents-accused-acting-like-theyre-Tienanmen-Square-fight-disputed-ranch-land.html?ITO=1490&ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490
  3. http://therightscoop.com/breaking-video-ranchers-and-protesters-block-highway-seized-bundy-cattle-released/

 

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Saturday Music and a Bit

I haven’t done one of these for a while, so I thought I would share some of my favorite music, with a little bonus at the end. I doubt anybody will be surprised that my first love in classical music was Wagner.

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