Labor Day

English: Col. Theodore Roosevelt. Crop of Imag...
English: Col. Theodore Roosevelt. Crop of Image:Theodore Roosevelt, 1898.png with minor Photoshop cleanup עברית: תאודור רוזוולט (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In North America today is Labor Day. If you’re a Canuck you can put the ‘u’ back in there for yourself. Theodore Roosevelt was a practical sort of man. Nobody ever accused him of being lazy but he also didn’t believe in doing useless work either. So he took a bunch of useless vowels out. Now you know why Jess and I trip each others spell checks a lot.

Here’s why Time thinks we celebrate Labor Day.

The first Monday of September means that white clothes are out, sales are in, summer holidays are over and classes begin. For many of us (but far from all of us), it’s a welcome day off of work or school, ahead of what is likely to be a busier month than the last.

Well, OK, I suspect they are sort of correct although I fail to see why we need a holiday that celebrates organization that protect the lazy and incompetent, you know like unions do. Mostly, I think we just needed a holiday to mark the end of summer. And to finish up the back-to-school shopping.

Of course, the schools have been known to jump the gun and thereby make this simply a long weekend, snow days have to come from somewhere after all.

In other news, Glenn Reynolds over at Instapundit thinks the cure over at Rotherham could well consist of rope, lamp posts, and officials, with some assembly required. I have trouble disagreeing.

Perhaps we should expect no more when community preservation is outsourced to bureaucracies, but the unavoidable reality is that on many occasions, Rotherham police came upon children being sexually exploited—in some cases, in the very instance of being raped—and arrested no one. The perpetrators are Pakistani; they might call us racists. The children seemed to consent. These gangs are violent.

All of which amount to an admission by those police officers that they are cowards, and something less than men. I’m reminded of the janitors who discovered Penn State coach Jerry Sandusky’s rape of children, and who said nothing, for fear of losing their jobs. They were cowards too, and deserve to be remembered as such.

The Self-Loathing of the British (and American) Left

George Orwell

You know, this is pretty interesting, and in truth, more and more it applies to the US as well. It’s not a pretty picture, and it’s not new either. Everytime I read this type of thing I’m reminded of senior British Labor politicians, as well as American ones like Teddy Kennedy visiting Moscow and advising the Soviets on how to work against the interests of the free world, and especially Reagan and Thatcher.

It’s often been observed that a certain type of British Lefty hates Britain – and that they reserve particularly hatred for Englishness. Back in 1941 George Orwell made this acute remark:

England is perhaps the only great country whose intellectuals are ashamed of their own nationality. In left-wing circles it is always felt that there is something slightly disgraceful in being an Englishman and that it is a duty to snigger at every English institution.

So what’s new? The difference today is that this shame and self-hatred now dominates Left-wing thought, whereas it was once balanced by the decent Left: who were proud to inherit the noble traditions of radical English patriotism.

Evidence for this disease is all around us, but shows up particularly in two red-button issues-of-the-day: the independence referendum, and the appalling revelations from Rotherham.

First, Scotland. The latest polls show that the United Kingdom is close to breaking up. This is a remarkable state of affairs when you consider that, a year ago, polls were two to one against partition. How has this occurred? Because we have allowed the British Labour party to lead the No debate.

This was a disastrous decision, given that, as Orwell noted, Labourites and Lefties revile and deride so many of the things perceived as quintessentially British. Take your pick from the monarchy, the flag, the Army, the history of rampant conquest, the biggest empire in the world, the supremacy of the English language, anyone who lives in the countryside, the national anthem, the City of London, the Royal Navy, a nuclear deterrent, the lion and the unicorn, duffing up the French, eating loads of beef – all this, for Lefties, is a source of shame. …

The self-loathing of the British Left is now a problem for us all – Telegraph Blogs.

Must really suck to be them, I think.

Happy Saturday, Finally!

Redneck environmentalism? You bet.

Tip of the Stetson to Cultural Limits at Rat Nation

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And I think I’ll move to the Republic of Bill

 

Klavan Speakes Leftist

A short glossary. Heh!

Where is comfort?

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There’s no doubt, my friends, that we live in unsettling times. The ending of the Cold War was hailed by some as the ‘end of history'; we wish! We can wish we did not live in such times as we now see, but as Gandalf says in ‘Lord of the Rings’, so do all who live in them; but it is not given to us to order the days of our lives. An historical perspective soon makes us grateful: that we are not in Rome when Alaric’s armies sacked it; or in Roman Britain facing the Angles and the Saxons as they marauded; neither are we in Constantinople in 1453 when it fell to the Ottomans. But we might understand more, now, how people felt as the world with they were familiar began to seem under threat.

It isn’t simply the, as yet for us, distant threat of ISIS (though we should not think it that far when we have in our midst those who might seek to harm us), it is the dislocation of the times. It is, in some ways, more comforting to think of President Obama as some kind of Manchurian Candidate than as what he is – a well-meaning man up against the hard fact that what he believes in and the real world don’t mix. Our sense that it is a ‘plague on all their houses’ when it comes to politics, derives from a feeling that none of them have answers to the problems which face us. There is, Adam Smith once wrote, ‘a lot of ruin in a nation’ – perhaps we shall see just how much it takes?

But the eternal verities stand where they always did. If you have too much regulation and too many taxes, things don’t work – and soon people don’t either. Welfare is a Christian duty, but when there are more taking out than putting in, it won’t work. When people depend on people, it generates good morale; when they depend on Government, it generates dependency. Power still tends to corrupt, and absolute power to do so absolutely. If something seems too good to be true, it isn’t. Power without responsibility is the prerogative of the harlot down the ages, and Government is best when it sticks to doing as little as possible. JFK was right – ask not what your country can do for you, but what you can do for it.

When politics becomes a ‘profession’ it attracts too many of the wrong sort; term limits should be there for all elected office. Ten years is enough, not least in the pressure of modern politics. All leaders go sort of mad after too long; it’s a service to them to save them from themselves. We need to be more involved too. In the end, if we care about freedom, it will thrive; if not we can have bread and circuses, till the wheat runs out and we find ourselves in the Coliseum. Naught for our comfort then? Aye, naught but this – that we are the children of the Living God and through Jesus, we are saved. If that is so, what have we to fear save fear itself?

Whittle on Race War, Narratives, and Political Correctness.

This one has been around since 2010 but, nothing has changed, except that Breitbart has multiplied

 

The origin of Political Correctness, from 2012

 

 

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