Machal

101 Squadron, IAF

101 Squadron, IAF

Back in 1948 when Little Satan’s history was measured in hours and days, they needed an air force because they were being attacked by five different national armies. Through official embargoes, and all the impediments the United States and Great Britain could devise (remember this was when Palestine was still a British mandate) they scraped up a ragtag flying circus. It was called Machal.

Their first combat aircraft were 25 Avia S-199s, a lousy Czechoslovak copy of the Messerschmitt Me-109, they took them apart and flew them into Israel in a C-46 Commando they had smuggled out of the United States, eventually they were followed by 3 B-17 Flying Fortresses, which set up an interesting anomaly: B-17s escorted by Me-109s flying against the Spitfires of the Royal Egyptian Air Force. Most of the pilots were American veterans of World War Two. here’s a bit of the story, told by the men who made that history

If you would like to know more (it’s a very interesting story, indeed) there’s a website about it here

And now they are one of the best in the world, a proud little sister to Great Satan herself.

.Israel-Flag-Flying2-2009

Islam’s War on Women

sharia freeGood News First

I would guess you remember Meriam Ibrahim. She’s the 27 year old Sudanese, married to an American, who gave birth a few weeks ago while shackled in a Sudanese prison. That sentence was averted some time ago but she was denied permission to leave the country. Yesterday after belated efforts by the Department of State (pressured by Congress) and with a huge assist from the Italian government, she received a blessing in Rome from the Pope, himself. Reports say she is resting up and soon will be traveling to the United States. Thanks be to God.

Apparently, not so, at least right now…

There was a report yesterday that made the rounds very quickly, and appeared to be legitimate, that ISIS had issued a regulation (or Fatwa, depending on source) requiring all females in Mosul to undergo FGM by Saturday. Apparently, it was a fake report, which is fine. Thing is, though, the fact that it was picked up so widely (I first saw it on “the Other McCain”) basically means that we have become so accustomed to the Islamic War on Women, that we assume the most horrendous rumors are true. I know that’s true for me.

When I read that report, the one reaction I did not have was that it was so barbaric that no government would do such a thing. To me it’s of a piece with Hamas hiding behind women’s skirts and carrying infants on fire missions (both confirmed) in Gaza. But still the media (especially the European media, including the BBC and The Telegraph) wants to blame Israel for the deaths of children, notwithstanding the thousands of rockets that have rained down on Israel, and the missiles taken from schools by the UN and returned to Hamas.

And along that line: This

My friend, Isabella Rose, on her site Reclaiming the Sacred, wrote yesterday on her experience, living amongst Muslims, in Europe. It is a story that should shock and dismay you. Here is an excerpt.

I really could not believe that the Muslin religion was definitely intended to be one of violence and war.

After all, in undergrad school, I had met a very kind Muslim girl, who was beyond polite to me, and I never had any thought but that she was but a good person, devoted to God, only under some different “path” than what I had come to know.

Yet during the course of one of my first few weeks abroad, a Coptic Christian from Egypt, who worked for a group of local Muslims, separate from the ones that I lived with, invited me out for a drink one night.

As we sat across from one another, in the dimly lit pub, he explained to me how much he supported my country.

I was shocked.

Aren’t all Europeans against America? I thought.

That was what I had always been told, at any rate.

But no, to him we were anything but the bad guys.

“You have no idea what the Muslims have done to my people,” he explained, as he recounted his family history and that of many others.

In so many words he went on to say:

“These Muslims that I work for here – they are nice people. They will be polite to you, and very kind. But if they could, they would me and they would kill you.”

via Reclaiming the Sacred

She will also tell you about, and show you, if your stomach is strong enough, the fate of this girl, actually a young Christian woman..It is not for the faint of heart. Isabella also quotes her Coptic friend as saying

They were only prevented by the laws of Christian nations – at least, until one day they could overturn those laws, and convert them to the laws of a Muslim state.

I completely agree with her, and if we are correct, there are three, and only three solutions.

  1. Surrender. You can if you want to. I and many others will not.
  2. Quarantine/Embargo Essentially cut off all contact between civilized people and Islam, this is essentially what we did from the repulse at Vienna until the collapse of the Ottoman Empire. It is a difficult, and wearying method of life
  3. Conquest. In a war of biblical horror, It would be very like the war in the Pacific during World War II, because we will be able to take very few prisoners.

The day before yesterday, here, I spoke of the end of Christianity in Mosul, which will for the first time, since the time of Christ, Himself, be free of Christians in the next week or so.

Some of my friends in the United Kingdom think that this should be a common war for us with Russia, I don’t really disagree with them but, I find it unlikely that Russia will see it. Russia, like Europe, is a dying society, it is no longer reproducing itself, most likely, within 50 years it will be owned by China, just as within a hundred years, Europe will be part of Islam. Unless we change it. Demography is after all, subject to change by the people being studied themselves. But I see no sign of it.

Crossposted to The Conservative Citizen

The Bear is Loose

I suppose you’ve heard, the President has taken to Twitting, uh sorry, Tweeting, “The Bear is Loose” when he supposedly sneaks out on the Secret Service to go have a burger with his prepositioned worshipers. It’s not only pretty sophomoric but also pretty transparent but, I suppose it’s more fun than presidentin’, especially after you’ve messed up every thing you’ve looked at. Kind of reminds me of Boo Boo and the Pick-a-nick baskets. But maybe Jellystone Park is not really the Yellowstone Caldera after all.

On a slightly more serious note. there is another bear loose in the woods, the Russian one. Contrary to what the TV wants you to think, this one isn’t exactly the Grizzly of the old Soviet Union, either. It’s more like a half-tamed brown bear that escaped from the Moscow Zoo. A quick chart will make my point here, I think.

140519_GlobalGDPFixed (1)

Huh, look at that! Just a tad bigger than Germany, the last time I looked the UK was a little bit bigger than Germany, and some sources say Germany is bigger than Russia. The thing is Russia is badly unbalanced. It lives and/or dies based on its gas and oil sales to Europe. It’s about as diversified as Saudi Arabia.

So if you really think about it, while Europe is terrified of losing Russia’s gas, Russia has to be just as terrified of it. OK, Europe is also paying a lot for that gas, like three times what we pay in the States. In my opinion, that while LNG is expensive to transport, it may well be feasible to replace Russian Gas with American, although a pipeline or 3 would be helpful.

If this was the “Rompin’, Stompin, Red Army” of the old cold war days, do you really think those Ukrainian rebels would be half-trained proxy fighter, dumb enough to shoot down an airliner? No in the old days this would be the real Red Army, just like it was in Germany in 45, Hungary in 56, and Czechoslovakia in 68. And in truth, even in those days, Ivan wasn’t ten feet tall, but he was pretty numerous. These clowns are pretenders to the czarist throne.

The problem is that the leadership in the west is even worse. President Bear, running away from his duty, Frau Merkel thinking that the World Cup is equivalent to the Kursk Salient. Russia isn’t winning, we’re just trying harder to lose.

The real problem here is that while Putin is a thug, he has an idea of what he wants and a plan to get it, which looks fairly realistic, and the guts to execute it. When you have no plan other than to perhaps react to someone else, if the media yells loud enough to be heard on the golf course, inevitably you are reacting, and slowly at that, and so Putin is getting what he wants, not because he has the power, but because the west is asleep at the wheel. They’re so far behind the curve that the OODA  Loop has crashed.

Same story in Iraq. Same story on the southern border, Same story in Israel, and soon, same story in the Pacific, and the same story in Washington.

Here, have a peanut butter sandwich.

For the First Time in the History of Iraq, Mosul is Now Empty of Christians

nazareneOne of the most horrific stories to come out of the ISIS conquest of central Iraq is the story of the Christians in Mosul (and the rest of the conquered area). There is no good parts of this story. Mafqud wa-Mawjud tells us some of the history of Christianity in the area. If you aren’t familiar with “The Church of the East” you will be amazed.

The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria ISIS has consolidated its hold on the city of Mosul in northern Iraq and is busy converting the metropolitan center to its own extremist brand of Sunni Islam.  Last week the group’s leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, now styling himself Caliph Ibrahim, issued an order for Christians in the city to a convert to Islam, b pay the jizya tax on non-Muslims at an unspecified rate, or c be killed, although some awareness of the option to leave was displayed in the order as well.  Reports that a church was torched are of uncertain veracity see a careful analysis of the photos circulating around the web at this blog, but images showing an Arabic ن for نصارى, nasara, meaning “Christians” spray-painted on various houses indicate that these houses were available to be seized.  Nor are Christians the only ones to suffer: reportedly some Shiite men have disappeared, Shiite families have been told to flee or be killed, and Shiite homes have been emblazoned with another Arabic letter, ر for رافضي rafidi something like “heretic scum,” while reports are also circulating that ISIS has destroyed the Sunni shrine and tomb of Nabi Yunus the biblical prophet Jonah in the ruins of ancient Nineveh to the east of the Tigris.  In this climate, most Christians chose to leave Mosul for the comparatively tolerant lands of Iraqi Kurdistan to the north, although refugees have reported being robbed of all their belongings at the checkpoint leaving the city.

The Chaldean Catholic Patriarch of Babylon, Louis Sako, who is presently the highest ranking ecclesiastical official of any denomination in Iraq, commented on the expulsion of the Christians, “For the first time in the history of Iraq, Mosul is now empty of Christians.”

This comment may strike many Americans as odd, because they presume that Iraq and the Middle East more generally are necessarily Muslim regions, and Christianity there must be a recent European importation.  But that is far from the case.  Since the study of Iraqi Christianity is an area of expertise, I thought I would present here a brief timeline of Mosul and its Christians.

In antiquity, whatever settlement or fortification existed on the site of the center of modern Mosul was overshadowed by Nineveh, the old Assyrian capital.  It is unknown when Christianity first arrived in Nineveh, although it had an important bishop by 554, when its bishop was one of the signatories to a council of the Church of the East.  At that time, the bishop was under the authority of the metropolitan archbishop of Arbela modern Erbil to the east of Nineveh, and the patriarchate was in the capital of the Sasanian Persian Empire, south of modern Baghdad.  By the early seventh century, there were also Syriac Orthodox Christians in the region we know of as Iraq, with their regional headquarters in Tagrit modern Tikrit, and an important monastery of Mor Matay outside Mosul.  There was also an important monastery of the Church of the East outside Mosul, the monastery of Mar Gabriel and Mar Abraham, also called the “Upper Monastery,” which later became an important center for liturgical reform in the Church of the East.

via The End of Christianity in Mosul | Mafqud wa-Mawjud.

I also note that Jessica’s co-author Chalcedon451 has written on this as well, here, and here. In addition there is a category there that deals with the history of The Church of the East, if you would like to know more of its history, it is quite fascinating, that category is here.

A short quote from Chalcedon451 will explain the symbol that is illustrated with this article. This is from his first linked article.

Upon the walls of the houses in Mosul, the Islamic symbol for ‘N’ (Nazarene) has appeared, (see the picture at the top of the piece) used, just as the Star of David was by the Nazis, as a sign that this place can be looted and its people attacked. The forces of ISIS have confiscated more than thirty churchesburning down one which goes back to antiquity. There were no twenty four hour news channels when the forces of Mohammed swept through the region in the seventh and eighth centuries, but even his forces were not this brutal. Across the whole of the Middle East, Christian communities as old as any that exist in the world are being exterminated.

I have come to have some doubts about the second war with Iraq, although I was a strong supporter of it. But, notwithstanding my, or your, beliefs on the validity of the war, it happened. What also happened is that America ran away from what we had wrought, thereby causing all the death and injuries to our soldiers and those of our allies, like the British who stood with us to be in vain. In addition, I see no reason why the martyrdom of the Iraqi Christians should not also be laid at the door of those who decided we should, in the inelegant military phrase, “bug out”. May God have mercy on their souls.

Frankly, at this late date there is little to do other than pray for our brothers and sisters in Iraq, while sadly noting that many have been martyred and no doubt more will be.

The View From the North

Barack Obama, President of the United States o...

Barack Obama, President of the United States of America, with Stephen Harper, Prime Minister of Canada. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It’s important, I think, to occasionally take a look at how we look from the outside, especially how our friends, especially the really good ones see us. And who would be better friends that the Canadians? What are they seeing, particularly since so many of us admire PM Harper so much. So let’s have a look. The first article is from Colin Robertson of The Globe and Mail it’s entitled

Why Canada wants to feel more love from the U.S.

Living beside the United States, remarked Pierre Trudeau, is like sleeping with an elephant: “No matter how friendly or temperate the beast, one is affected by every twitch and grunt.” The twitching is getting to the Harper government and it has responded with a series of pokes.

A trio of senior ministers – John Baird, Joe Oliver, Greg Rickford – travelled to New York this month to voice what Stephen Harper calls our “profound disappointment” over the delayed Keystone XL KXL pipeline. Said Mr. Oliver: “This isn’t right, this isn’t fair.”

In Winnipeg, Agriculture Minister Gary Ritz accused the United States of behaving like a “schoolyard bully” over country-of-origin labelling.

Last week in Washington, Ambassador Gary Doer and MP Rob Merrifield delivered an invitation from House of Commons Speaker Andrew Scheer to Republican House Speaker John Boehner to visit Canada for discussions on KXL and other issues.

If the Obama administration wants further evidence that Canada deserves some attention it should watch the recent exchange between former ambassador Frank McKenna and U.S. Ambassador Bruce Heyman. “It’s like a marriage. It might be really good for you but I’ve got some problems,” said Mr. McKenna of Canadian frustration over KXL and financing the Windsor-Detroit customs plaza.

Canada-U.S. relations operate on three levels: international, intermestic and people-to-people.

Ours is a complex relationship that goes beyond the traditional diplomatic conventions. Supported by the hidden wiring of connections between provinces and states, business and civil society, it is usually a model for neighbourly relations.

In international summitry, President Barack Obama and Prime Minister Harper are aligned on the big-ticket issues of peace and security, banking and finance, even if they differ on approaches to climate change.

The people-to-people relationship is solid. Americans like us more than we like them. We share much in common, at work and at play, although beating Team USA at hockey is now our main Olympic goal.

It’s on the transactional level of trade and commerce that we have problems, with KXL top of the list. For Canada, KXL is i>the problem with the partner. For the United States, KXL is a problem with a partner.

via CDFAI – New From Colin Robertson.

If I’m honest (and I always try to be) I think he’s pretty much right on all counts

Daryl Copeland give us a Canadian view of the world. While I don’t completely agree with everything he says here, his view is certainly at least as valid as mine, and I think we should at least consider what he says.

Blowback: Iraq and the law of unintended consequences

Under relentless pressure from the jihadist movement Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), the political collapse and territorial disintegration of Iraq in recent weeks has been striking. If this process is not reversed, the emergence of a radical Islamist enclave is likely to cause serious security problems for decades, both in the Middle East and beyond.

That has been the focus of most reporting to date. The big-picture implications are even more profound.

To be sure, the roots of the current crisis are complex and tangled. They can be traced back at least to the unravelling of the Ottoman Empire following the First World War, and the subsequent division of the territorial spoils by Britain and France according to the terms of the Sykes-Picot Agreement.

That said, and notwithstanding Tony Blair’s apparent amnesia, much of the current disaster appears directly attributable to the ill-fated decision on the part of the United States and its coalition allies to intervene militarily in Iraq 2003-11. As it happened, much of the “shock and awe” was reserved for the invaders. That colossal strategic error cost some $1.7 trillion, resulted in the deaths of over 150,000 Iraqis and 4,800 coalition soldiers and, together with the Great Recession, spelled the end of unipolarity — American international dominance.

While those costs are extraordinary, the longer term damage may prove even greater. The ISIS gains in Syria and Iraq may be only the beginning, and could give rise to further developments inimical to peace, progress and prosperity, both in the region and further afield. The obvious hazards are related to Islamic extremism, sectarian strife, civil war and ethnic partition.

Of even greater concern, however, is the continued militarization of international policy.

via CDFAI – In the Media

I think one of the key points here is that the world is seeing that the unipolar power structure that has held since 1990 is unraveling. It is doing so because America is letting it, nothing has really changed, except for the will of our government. If that is what the American people want (which I doubt, very strongly) then so be it. If it isn’t we need to start thinking about what we are going to do after Obama. We haven’t been thinking long-term we have been fighting a reactive (not pro active) battle against the administration, and that is why we’re losing. What are we for. Americans are an optimistic forward-looking people, we’re not known for being against things but for better things. We should be doing politics the same way.

What are we for; and will we fight for it?

Failure in the Use of Knowledge | Online Library of Law and Liberty

English: René Descartes, the French philosophe...

English: René Descartes, the French philosopher, by the French engraver Balthasar Moncornot. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This is a good article by Theodore Dalrymple on knowledge and its use. Go ahead and read it and I’ll add a bit.

Good sense, said Descartes at the beginning of the Discourse on Method, is the most evenly-distributed thing in the world. However displeased we may be with the distribution of anything else, each of us believes that we have a sufficiency of it (unlike, he might have added, everyone else).

I suppose the question of who are the wise men and who the fools will never be settled once and for all—certainly not in matters that touch on politics. For my own part, though not over-endowed with political perspicacity, I am often surprised by the utter foolishness of the great ones of the world. They seem to me to take the Bourbons, who learnt nothing and forgot nothing, not as a warning but as a model. Over and over they make the same mistakes and fall prey to the same illusions. It is almost as if ineducability were the key to success in a political career. That, or naivety.

When the Iraqi army collapsed before the onslaught of the ISIS bands—not a formidable challenge, one might have thought, for a proper army—some people were shocked. How is it that the Iraqi army, assiduously armed and trained, dressed as an army ought to be dressed, presumably the firm upholder of the Iraqi order, melted away to nothing in only a few days? How is it that such resistance as is being offered comes from the impromptu action of militias rather than from trained forces?

The naivety of the expectation that the Iraqi army would be and would act as a real army once it was trained is to me astonishing, though I suppose it is itself naïve to be astonished at such naivety. To have expected such a thing was grossly to overestimate the role of formal training in the establishment of institutions. The necessary was mistaken for the sufficient. Human beings do not work like clockwork and, perhaps, in the end it is best that this is so.

via Failure in the Use of Knowledge | Online Library of Law and Liberty.

I wasn’t surprised either at the collapse of the Iraqi army. People fight for things to a point. But mostly they fight for their friends, usually their squad, platoon, sometimes in the west the regiment, and to maintain their honor. None of those things come from formal education, they come from sharing good times and bad.

It’s the same in the civilian world, if you don’t forge your people into a team (and most don’t) when things get even a little tough, your bunch will fall apart into a backbiting mob, who couldn’t agree on how to defeat a wet paper bag. I’ve seen it, many times, and I’ve also been privileged to work for people whom we would work 24 hours a day in broiling heat and really, really cold conditions. It’s about leadership, and tradition. Making it work is very hard work, and so very few do it but when it’s done right, it’s a marvel for the ages. It requires tough times, I think, and an ability to sublimate your personal goals (both the leader and the led), if you can build such a thing, you’ll be among the best.

Then, maybe, people will emulate what you did, and that’s how armies get better, and so do other organizations. And building a team.

Here is one way

There are other methods and in any case it is wise to avoid being at the Little Bighorn,

especially without your Gatling guns.

%d bloggers like this: