I Am Become America; the Destroyer of Dreams

Or not, what will we choose?

In 1903 this happened

First_flight2

Those bicycle mechanics from Ohio flew about half the wingspan of a 747, and changed the world, forever.

66 years later, yesterday we, America, did this.

moonlanding

Later on, we left a car, like this:

That’s a good summary of my America

But 24 years to the day before that flag went up, a man, in Alamogordo, NM said this:

I am become Death, the Destroyer of Worlds.

He had just watched this

But, you know, Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer was wrong, at least so-far. The nuclear weapons program has not destroyed any worlds, in fact its very first result was to save at least two million casualties, half of them Japanese, it then went on to help prevent war between the US and USSR.

Si vis pacem, para bellum

And thus America’s course through the stormy 20th century.

But you know, yesterday was the 45th anniversary of the day we landed on the moon. Other than the internet, what have we accomplished since?

Maybe this is why.

Think about it.

This is more like America

Laid Back Video Sunday

Hey guys, it’s Sunday, and yep, the world ain’t getting any better but, we ain’t gonna fix it today. Let’s just kick back and have some fun shall we?

 

Perry-copy1

Power Line Blog

My all time favorite Aussies

 

You know, there has to be an easier way!

 

If you’re like me (old as dirt) you might remember when we picked corn like this

 

It’s changed just a little

 

For you stray Brits who complain that a real pickup doesn’t fit on your roads. Corn is usually planted in 30” rows, so a 12 row picker is about 35 feet wide, and a grain cart is about 12 feet wide. How’d you like to meet that on the road?

If you know me, you know I have a thing for British gingers, this was the first. By the way, Charlie Chaplin wrote the song.

 

Who is the current one? You’ll have to figure that one out for yourself.

Jess on the bench

 

Then again, I’d go to the range with her!

Feb25

And finally, this:

Power Line Blog

 

 

 

Is Administrative Law Unlawful ?

English: Detail of Preamble to Constitution of...

English: Detail of Preamble to Constitution of the United States Polski: Fragment preambuły Konstytucji Stanów Zjednoczonych (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

From the Constitution of the United States:

ARTICLE I, SECTION 1.

All legislative powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate and House of Representatives.


 

When we talk of Administrative law, we are speaking of an extra-legal add on, which has very little (if any) base in the Constitution. If you are not familiar with it, here is a link to an introductory lecture POL611 . That’s how it is conceptualized these days. But is it constitutional at all? That’s different story. I’ve spoken of this several times lately once at Jess’ Watchtower, and on this site here, and here. It’s an important concept. Much of the content here is taken from a series on The Power Line Blog here, here, here, and here. Don’t panic, they’re quite short posts! This is all both there, and here based on a book, Is Administrative Law Unlawful, by Philip Hamburger, who is the Maurice and Hilda Friedman Professor of Law at Columbia Law School. He received his B.A. from Princeton University and his J.D. from Yale Law School.

Here is a not so short video presentation of what he is saying that he gave at Hillsdale College, which was published on May 14 of this year. It is eminently worth your time.

If you remember I commented in the article A Most Conservative Revolution that we don’t pay enough attention to what I call “the Bill of Particulars” in the middle of the document. The reason I say that is in this article. Everyone of them is protesting the arbitrary power of the Crown acting with or without Parliament (which did not represent the British in North America.

Here are a couple which might sound familiar to us today:

  • He has erected a multitude of New Offices, and sent hither swarms of Officers to harrass our people, and eat out their substance.
  • He has endeavoured to prevent the population of these States; for that purpose obstructing the Laws for Naturalization of Foreigners; refusing to pass others to encourage their migrations hither, and raising the conditions of new Appropriations of Lands. (Although this one you might want to read in the negative.)

In any event, I hope you see my point here.

The point is that the Constitution, which is written in very clear English, and means what it says, “All legislative powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States.” It does not say that Congress may delegate that power to the executive, or his subordinates. In fact, John Locke said this.

The people alone can appoint the form of the commonwealth, which is by constituting the legislative, and appointing in whose hands that shall be. And when the people have said, We will submit to rules, and be governed by laws made by such men, and in such forms, no body else can say other men shall make laws for them; nor can the people be bound by any laws, but such as are enacted by those whom they have chosen, and authorized to make laws for them. The power of the legislative[,] being derived from the people by a positive voluntary grant and institution, can be no other than what that positive grant conveyed, which being only to make laws, and not to make legislators, the legislative can have no power to transfer their authority of making laws, and place it in other hands.

In short administrative law = the King’s prerogative which leads directly to the Star Chamber and High Commission and ≠ the Rule of Law, more properly described as “The rule through and under the law” which is the traditional Anglo-American definition of The Common Law.

Undoubtedly we will be returning to this subject soon because this is important. In fact this is the battle that led to Runnymede, to The English Civil War, to the Glorious Revolution, to the American Revolution, an in part to the American Civil War as well.

The fundamental article of my political creed is that despotism, or unlimited sovereignty, or absolute power, is the same in a majority of a popular assembly, an aristocratical council, an oligarchical junto, and a single emperor. Equally arbitrary, cruel, bloody, and in every respect diabolical.

John Adams

 

Video Monday: The (Mostly) Whittle Edition

In a sense, I’m cleaning up after the holiday, these have been in the queue for less than a week. All are valuable, and all but one feature Bill Whittle. Normally I would say enjoy, but in this case, pay attention and learn, and start thinking how we are going to fix it.

Obamadelphia, well, why not?

Trifecta on ISIS and why it has erupted, and some on its methods.

Continuing with Trifecta

And a reminder of who we are, and how we got that way.

Oh, yeah, from Norfolk, Nebraska. Which strikes me as a very significant name, combining the stronghold of the Parliamentary forces with a good conservative state.

Fire and Water: Händel with Care

Georg Friedrich Händel

Cover of Georg Friedrich Händel

Some of you know that I’m a music lover. I love almost all types, except the trash that owes more to visuals than the music. That means my cutoff is somewhere around 1980 with some exceptions.

But my main love is classical music. And to put an even finer point on it, Baroque music, especially Händel. Who is unarguably the best British composer ever born in Germany. Part of my love for this type of music is the precise, mathematical precision of it, as you listen, see if you can hear it. It’s very elegant, in the normal sense but also in the engineering sense of the term.

Even in that genre though, this is special. The selections are fairly commonplace, a couple of his best but heard often. But here they are played on authentic instruments, and it makes far more difference than one would think.

So here is Le concert spirituel conducted by Hervé Niquet, at Royal Albert Hall. From the 2012 Proms.

  • The Water Music
  • Music for the Royal Fireworks

Enjoy.

 

The Vote

A reminder of what happened today, in (and from) 1776

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