The Parke-Custis Mansion

Do you recognize this house?

The mansion was built on the orders of George Washington Parke Custis, a step-grandson and “adopted” son of George Washington and only grandson of Martha Washington. Custis was a prominent resident of what was then known as Alexandria County, at the time a part of the District of Columbia. George Hadfield, an English architect who also worked on the design of the United States Capitol, designed the mansion. Construction began eleven years after L’Enfant’s Plan for the future city of Washington, D.C., had designated an area directly across the Potomac River to be the site of the “President’s house” (now the White House) and the “Congress house” (now the United States Capitol).

It still stands, one of only two houses with a direct connection to George Washington himself, it may also be the second most famous house in the United States (after the White House).

It was stolen from the last owner by the US Government (because the owners wife failed to pay her property taxes, in person) in wartime. The owner’s son won it back about ten years later and sold it back to the government. You see it was no longer a particularly nice place to live, the government had used the lawn and even the rose garden as a cemetery. In fact, the government, in its vindictiveness buried the first soldiers, members of a colored Infantry unit, in the châtelaine’s prized rose garden. It did this while the owner, a soldier, who loved it above all material things, was on active duty. As you would surmise from looking at the house, the owner, was in fact, a general. He was, perhaps, the most famous American general in history.

Who was he?

He was the son of a Revolutionary hero, nicknamed Light-Horse Harry for his skill with the cavalry. He married the Step-Granddaughter of George Washington. He was one of the most intrepid of officers in the Mexican War, the first group of officers to have the stars fall on them.

He was Robert Edward Lee, General, Confederate States Army, The house is now called Arlington House, here is a reasonably current picture.

The cemetery is Arlington National Cemetery. And so although it was started with some of the basest motives of revenge and rancor, it has become most meet and fit. Now America’s best and bravest sleep around the house of America’s best general. The very man who once said that:

Duty is the most sublime word in our language. Do your duty in all things. You cannot do more. You should never wish to do less.

Those resting around his house have certainly done their duty, beyond compare.
And so as we celebrate Memorial/ Decoration Day let us remember all those who have done their duty, even unto the last full measure of devotion.
In a related matter, General Lee’s citizenship was restored by Public Law 94-67 signed by President Ford on 5 August 1975 thus restoring him to citizenship in the country he loved second only to Virginia, itself.

Veteran’s Day

For the first time as we observe Veteran’s Day, there is no one to take our salute. Florence Green, a member of the Women’s Royal Air Force, died on 4 February 2012 two weeks short of her 111th birthday, at King’s Lynne. She was the very last veteran of World War I.

And now they’re all gone, the doughboys, Tommies, the Diggers, the Canucks, and the Kiwis. And the men of the Second World War are following swiftly.

These are the men that have kept us free. For this holiday is about brave men, yesterday we talked about how the Unknown British Warrior was awarded the American Medal of Honor. Today I’ll note that five Americans, ranging from Ordinary Seaman to Lieutenant Colonel have won the Victoria Cross, plus the Unknown Soldier buried at Arlington, by order of the King.

The Great War, of course, is when the United States made its debut as the great world power. From our entry in 1917 until today is fairly termed “The American Century” for as the Pax Britannica ended in 1914 and chaos ensued between the wars as we hid in our continent and from 1945 the Pax Americana has been in place.

It could be fairly said that the wars of the 20th Century were the “Wars of Freedom”, for more people have been freed from tyranny by the United States and our allies than at any other time in history.

The legend of American bravery is known worldwide, from the Marine sergeant, who lead the charge at the battle of Belleau Wood, who led the charge with the command, “Come on you sons-of-bitches, do you want to live forever.”( Noting that it is now “Bois de la Brigade de Marine“, in their honor) to General McAuliffe’s response to the German demand to surrender at Bastogne, “Nuts” to the Admiral Nimitz’s comment on Iwo Jima, “Uncommon valor was a common virtue.” Thus has been remarked the common bravery of American troops in every case in all the wars of these Planetary soldiers.

As probably every one reading this knows, the average American idolizes American soldiers, they have gone from being the unwanted stepchildren of the revolution, because of the mistrust engendered by the occupying British regulars, to by far the most trusted of American institutions, trusted by over  80% of Americans. They have earned it, and earned it the hard way by blood, toil, tears, honor, integrity, and sweat from Lexington Green to Afghanistan they have become legend, at one and the same time, “America’s Army” and the “Army of the Free”. The Armed Forces are the best of America. If you were to ask the common people of anyplace they have been, you will find their fans, maybe not the government, but the people remember.

If you don’t happen to know, those streamers on the service flags are called battle streamers, each of them remembers a battle going back to Lexington Green. It has been a contentious life we have lived, and freedom always has enemies.

But they have done other things, they are often the first humanitarian aid anywhere in the world after a natural disaster, the mapping of the United States was done by the Army, your GPS system is courtesy of the Air Force and the Internet you’re reading this on was started by the US Department of Defense.

But let us not make the mistake many do, it’s not technology that wins wars, it’s men, and now women as well, women like these:

What do you think goes through the minds of women in the parts of the world that don’t offer women equal rights when these women show up in their midst as American officers and warriors? Think maybe some get the idea that women are equal to men.

I’d say things like this have done more to advance women’s rights than all the feminists yelling in the last fifty years. It was the same when the military integrated in 1948, that’s where it was all proved, although we already knew it, really, blacks have served bravely and well ever since Crispus Attucks was killed at the Boston Massacre.

But you know, it’s always had a cost, often a very high cost, and a wise people don’t forget that, no matter the technology, it has to be operated by people and by brave people, from the rifleman to the man who may have to turn the key to unleash Armageddon itself. And in American history, the military has never failed us, even when we and our political leadership has not been worthy of them. Many of us use as a catchphrase a rewording of the last line of our national anthem, instead of  “the Land of the Free and The Home of the Brave“, we are wont to say “The Land of the Free because of the Brave.”

We are also quite content, while not resting in our quest, to be known by the friends we keep.

But sometimes the brave are lost and then we honor our fallen countrymen, as they deserve. Bill Whittle a few years ago had something to say about American Honor, and I’d like you to read it.

On October 7th, 2002, I returned to Los Angeles from Arlington National Cemetery where we’d interred my father, 2nd Lt. William Joseph Whittle, who died from what may have been sheer joy during a fishing trip in Canada.

My dad served in the US Army in Germany, from 1944 through 1946. He was an intelligence officer, and was responsible for recording the time of death of the convicted War Criminals at Nuremburg after the war. He saw them hanged — he stood there with a stopwatch. He was 21 years old.

My father spent two years in the U.S. Military. He spent a lifetime in the corporate world. After twenty years as a world-class hotel manager, turning entire properties from liabilities into assets, he was let go without so much as a thank-you dinner or a handshake. Twenty years of service. He was a four-star general in the corporate world for two decades, and that was his reward.

Monday afternoon, at 1 pm, I stood underneath the McClellan arch at ANC. There were 13 family members there. There were also 40 men in uniform. I was stunned.

They took my dad’s ashes, in what looked like a really nice cigar box (what a little box for such a big man, I thought at that moment), and placed it in what looked like a metallic coffin on the back of a horse-drawn caisson. His ashes were handled by other twenty-one year old men, men as young as he had been, men whose fathers were children when my dad was in uniform. Everything was inspected, checked, and handled with awesome, palpable, radiating reverence and respect.

As we walked behind the caisson, the band played not a dirge, but a march… a tune that left me searching for the right adjective, which I didn’t find until the flight home. It was triumphal. It was the sound of Caesar entering Rome; the sound of a hero coming home. It was the only time during the service that I really began to cry.

Continue reading Honor

This is part of that Honor

 

The Parke-Custis Mansion

Do you recognize this house?

The mansion was built on the orders of George Washington Parke Custis, a step-grandson and “adopted” son of George Washington and only grandson of Martha Washington. Custis was a prominent resident of what was then known as Alexandria County, at the time a part of the District of Columbia. George Hadfield, an English architect who also worked on the design of the United States Capitol, designed the mansion. Construction began eleven years after L’Enfant’s Plan for the future city of Washington, D.C., had designated an area directly across the Potomac River to be the site of the “President’s house” (now the White House) and the “Congress house” (now the United States Capitol).

It still stands, one of only two houses with a direct connection to George Washington himself, it may also be the second most famous house in the United States (after the White House).

It was stolen from the last owner by the US Government (because the owners wife failed to pay her property taxes, in person) in wartime. The owner’s son won it back about ten years later and sold it back to the government. You see it was no longer a particularly nice place to live, the government had used the lawn and even the rose garden as a cemetery. In fact, the government, in its vindictiveness buried the first soldiers, members of a colored Infantry unit, in the châtelaine’s prized rose garden. It did this while the owner, a soldier, who loved it above all material things, was on active duty. As you would surmise from looking at the house, the owner, was in fact, a general. He was, perhaps, the most famous American general in history.

Who was he?

He was the son of a Revolutionary hero, nicknamed Light-Horse Harry for his skill with the cavalry. He married the Step-Granddaughter of George Washington. He was one of the most intrepid of officers in the Mexican War, the first group of officers to have the stars fall on them.

He was Robert Edward Lee, General, Confederate States Army, The house is now called Arlington House, here is a reasonably current picture.

The cemetery is Arlington National Cemetery. And so although it was started with some of the basest motives of revenge and rancor, it has become most meet and fit. Now America’s best and bravest sleep around the house of America’s best general. The very man who once said that:

Duty is the most sublime word in our language. Do your duty in all things. You cannot do more. You should never wish to do less.

Those resting around his house have certainly done their duty, beyond compare.
And so as we celebrate Memorial/ Decoration Day let us remember all those who have done their duty, even unto the last full measure of devotion.
In a related matter, General Lee’s citizenship was restored by Public Law 94-67 signed by President Ford on 5 August 1975 thus restoring him to citizenship in the country he loved second only to Virginia, itself.

In Memoriam

LTC Luke Weathers Jr., USAF, Ret. was buried today at Arlington National Cemetery with full military honors including the flyover of a flight of F-16’s in the Missing Man formation.

LTC Weathers who was veteran of World War II, serving in the 15th Air Force, 332d Fighter Group, commanded by COL (later BGEN) Benjamin O. Davis Jr., where he won the Distinguished Flying Cross. The 332d earned the unique distinction of never losing a bomber they were escorting in some of the heaviest aerial combat in history.

The 332d was of course the famed “Red Tails” who in an act of bravado painted the tails of their fighter bright red so the Germans would be able to identify them easier. Every account of the campaign that I have read, most recently The Wild Blue in which Stephen Ambrose built the story around Senator George McGovern who flew a B-24 in the 15th Air Force, says that were by far the best escort pilots they came in contact with.

Lt. Col. Luke Weathers Jr. funeral

Lt. Col. Luke Weathers Jr. funeral: via Washington Post

They also were the justly famed Tuskegee Airmen who as black officers and men fought all the prejudice the south could bring to bear on them before, during, and after the war. Now think about this, America wasn’t kind to blacks in the 1940’s but, to the Germans they were very literally subhuman, and they painted the tails of their planes bright red to taunt them. I’d say these were some of the best warriors America ever sent into battle. They were also a key element in the integration of the armed forces ordered by President Truman and finally achieved under President Eisenhower.

As with all the veterans of World War 2, they are becoming thin on the ground. We should do all we can to honor these gallant Americans while they are still here to hear us.

Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends. John 15:13

Or for that matter, explicitly make the offer.

Requiescat in Pace

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