Remembrance and Resolve

Ultima Cumaei venit iam carminis ætas;
Magnus ab integro sæclorum nascitur ordo.
iam redit et Virgo, redeunt Saturnia regna,
iam nova progenies cælo demittitur alto.

From the  Eclogue of Virgil:

An American flag flies over the rubble of the World Trade Center in New York on Sept. 13, 2001

And so for the thirteenth time, we remember that day, that day of infamy, in New York, in Pennsylvania, and at the Pentagon, when we realized that while we may not be interested in war, war is interested in us. Once again, last night, we heard an American president vow retribution on those who would kill Americans. His words were not my words, nor is my background his background, but perhaps we are united in this. I think there is no more important duty than this

There is a sense of frustration in the very air of America these days. Many of us have the sense that the sacrifices and lives of many good men and women were thrown away to save the face of other men, and now we shall have to plow ground that we have worked before. But we know, as we always have, that politicians are vain, and sometimes even evil, and we have to do the best we can with what we are given. This is mostly the post I wrote for the tenth anniversary. It will serve again, I think, like many of those who have read it. Like the President’s speech, they are mere words, but I think them good words.


There isn’t one of us who doesn’t remember what we were doing. I was having a day off and was watching Good Morning, America and I will remember to my dying day Diane Sawyer’s “Oh, my God!”.

I was very lucky though, although I have family working in the financial district, I lost no one close to me. But in a very real sense they were all my family; the workers, the Firemen and Police doing their everyday heroics, the passerby. They were all our family: the family of the free. For this was an attack on freedom. For this was an attack on the free market system and the military that protects it.

To me then and now it hearkened back to another ‘Day of Infamy‘: 7 December 1941, both in the manner of the attack, a sneak attack on a peaceful country, and in how I instantly understood, as I never had, what my parents and their generation had felt on that awful Sunday afternoon.

And I knew something else, even as they had, I now lived in a country at war, where nothing short of victory was acceptable. I thought my country was united in that, I still think most of it is. I also knew that the retribution of America and her allies would be terrible and no interference by anyone would be tolerated. For indeed “They had sounded forth the trumpet that shall never call retreat”.

And I was heartened by the reaction of the world, especially this:

Nobody ever showed their support better than the cousins, which is not surprising, after all the Queen has known us well since she was Princess Elizabeth driving an ambulance in the Second World War.

Another thing I understand now was my Dad’s and his generation’s respect for Roosevelt even if they disagreed with almost all of his policies, he was the war president. I now have that feeling, even love, for George W. Bush.

We really are an exceptional nation, nobody in the world, outside of the Anglosphere understood our determination, in Bevin Alexander’s words “to proceed door to door in the very heart of the Arab-Muslim world, to make clear that we were ready to kill and to die to stop our society from being undermined, and to say, gun in hand, to the people, and to the governments who permit terrorists to exist, “What is it that you don’t understand about leaving our country alone?”” And I find it notable that those stalwart Allies of the Anglosphere are marching forward to the battle in step with us, as it has been for nearly a century now.

And so, almost before we knew what was happening the first counterattack was underway. It ended in a smoking hole in Pennsylvania, it was a very expensive counterattack but it was successful. And like the targets of the attack itself, it was conducted by ordinary Americans, no different from you and me.  The counterattack launched with that simple command, “Let’s Roll”.

The time for our superb military had not yet come. But it would, with dire consequences for our enemies.

Bin Laden should have studied us better, for indeed the man who said this was half American:

We have before us an ordeal of the most grievous kind. We have before us many, many long months of struggle and of suffering. You ask, what is our policy? I will say: It is to wage war, by sea, land, and air, with all our might and with all the strength that God can give us; to wage war against a monstrous tyranny never surpassed in the dark, lamentable catalogue of human crime. That is our policy. You ask, what is our aim? I can answer in one word: It is victory, victory at all costs, victory in spite of all terror, victory, however long and hard the road may be.

The American people are difficult to turn into an enemy, for we much prefer to be everyone’s  friend, but attacking the homeland will do it, every time. There is no more fearsome enemy in the history of the world than the aroused people of America.

A quick look back will show this. On 7 December 1941 the battleship USS Arizona was sunk on battleship row in Pearl Harbor. 35 months later, the other old battleships of the 7th Fleet, also sunk at Pearl Harbor, sank the Japanese fleet at Leyte Gulf, in the last surface gun action ever fought. The new battleships in 3rd fleet were off chasing the IJN’s aircraft carriers. Moored close to the Arizona is the USS Missouri on whose deck 11 months after Leyte Gulf, in Tokyo Bay, Imperial Japan surrendered. Yes, we are impatient, and sometimes fickle, but do not mess with our homeland.

It never fails to amaze me how much the enemies of the United States rely upon the goodness and restraint of the United States. The Taliban who supported al Qaeda knew that their sheer existence beyond the next 30 minutes depended exclusively on the forbearance of the United States.

If we were the imperial power that we are so often accused of being, Afghanistan would now be the world’s largest sheet of glass. If a city rebelled against Imperial Rome, the retribution was that every living thing, right down to the dogs, was put to the sword, the city was destroyed and the ruins sown with salt, so nothing would grow. I dare you to find Carthage on a current map.

Instead we very carefully target our retribution on those that we believe are guilty. Indeed, we have developed weapons that allow us to target an individual  from several hundred miles away. Instead of our massive air raids in World War II we now use a stealth aircraft with individually targeted missiles. I have seen reports that say that the Pakistanis, when they see one of our drones overhead, calmly go about their business, knowing that only the target is in danger, as opposed to the panic when their own air force is attacking.

This is the way that America, a country that values each and every human life makes war.

This is America the Avenger. Not on the innocent people of cities and countries, but upon the malefactors hiding in its back streets and hills.

This is America at war. Not destroying cities and countries but only individual enemies.

This is America, the superpower that can destroy any country on Earth in an hour, but chooses to put its own sons and daughters at risk to find only the guilty.

This is America, where steel from the World Trade Center now is incorporated into the bow of the USS New York, leading the ship into harms way.

This is America, the first revolutionaries, who learned to control the revolution, but not to let it die and slip back into tyranny, about whom our President said, long ago:

We dare not forget today that we are the heirs of that first revolution. Let the word go forth from this time and place, to friend and foe alike, that the torch has been passed to a new generation of Americans—born in this century, tempered by war, disciplined by a hard and bitter peace, proud of our ancient heritage—and unwilling to witness or permit the slow undoing of those human rights to which this Nation has always been committed, and to which we are committed today at home and around the world.

Let every nation know, whether it wishes us well or ill, that we shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend, oppose any foe, in order to assure the survival and the success of liberty.

and who later that day also said:

Now the trumpet summons us again—not as a call to bear arms, though arms we need; not as a call to battle, though embattled we are—but a call to bear the burden of a long twilight struggle, year in and year out, “rejoicing in hope, patient in tribulation”—a struggle against the common enemies of man: tyranny, poverty, disease, and war itself.  Can we forge against these enemies a grand and global alliance, North and South, East and West, that can assure a more fruitful life for all mankind? Will you join in that historic effort?

  In the long history of the world, only a few generations have been granted the role of defending freedom in its hour of maximum danger. I do not shrink from this responsibility—I welcome it. I do not believe that any of us would exchange places with any other people or any other generation. The energy, the faith, the devotion which we bring to this endeavor will light our country and all who serve it—and the glow from that fire can truly light the world.

This is the America that I grew up in and love, and I will not allow the destruction of, from without or within. For above all others, this hill, with its city gleaming bright, is worth dying for and worth living for.

Many things have happened since President Kennedy said those words on a cold January morning.

The Berlin Wall was built up and torn down.

The World Trade Center was built up and knocked down.

The specter of the Soviet Union no longer threatens the world.

The threat of Islamofascism has arisen from the shadows.

From Stettin in the Baltic to Trieste in the Adriatic, an iron curtain that had descended across the Continent, has now been lifted. Old and proud states of eastern Europe have been liberated. Many having seen what America believes, in action, have become proud allies of America.

Al Qaeda decided that the old American will had been eroded and has had that illusion shattered, and is on its way to destruction. Almost weekly we hear of the demise of more of its leadership as America again sorts out the guilty from the innocent.

Many things have happened since 9/11/01 also. How will it all work out? We will never know. This is the eternal war between liberty and slavery.

As Cassandra of Villainous Company put it on 27 June 2005:

Our own Revolution was not without blemish. Innocent men were tarred and feathered. Families torn asunder. People bled, and suffered and starved. There was even [shudder] terrorism. But it lit a flame that has burned brightly for over 200 years. There are signs that this is happening in the MiddleEast: Arabs are looking at election day in Iraq and Afghanistan and demanding democratic reforms in Egypt and Lebanon and Kuwait. The fire in men’s (and women’s) hearts is spreading.

We would like certainty. We would like painless progress. We would like closure. We will not get any of those things.

On July 4th we must ask ourselves, what do we believe? Our military – brand new immigrants who enlist before the ink is dry on their visas – believe in those words so strongly that they will lay down their lives to spread the fire of democracy. They also believe (as I do) that their purpose is to serve American foreign policy aims, no matter how abstract and long-term they may seem. No matter how difficult to explain to the American people. No matter how frustrating in the short term.

What kind of world will we bequeath to our grandchildren? It may be that long before we know. But our actions today will have an incalculable effect on that far-off tomorrow. And if our policy is not firmly grounded in the spread of those long-ago words:

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights

…then I wonder if we shall not be the first Americans who fail to pass the blessings of liberty on to the next generation?

“The only thing necessary for evil to triumph. is for good men to do nothing.” – Edmund Burke.

And so as we remember and celebrate the lives of the victims of that horrible day ten years ago, so we must also renew our determination that their sacrifice and the sacrifices of our military since shall not have been in vain. For as another President said:

It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us—that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion—that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.


 

And so once again the dread war tocsin sounds calling us forth to unfinished business. We cry that we are weary of this business, and truly we are, for we have been fighting this war overtly for thirteen years, but in truth we joined this battle against evil in the First Barbary War, back in 1801. Some would say this has been man’s battle ever since we left the garden, and it will remain our battle until the Lord returns. I think that is true.

But you know, in the last few weeks, I again saw Americans act as is our wont, when we saw two of our countrymen butchered  because they were American, our weariness was forgotten and a great roar went up, and the Americans will be seen again fighting evil in the middle east. And again America will have allies, and who those allies are will tell who is who, and the American people will draw their own conclusions.

But do mark this: America will be free.

:

Now comes the final era of the Sibyl’s song;
The great order of the ages is born afresh.
And now justice returns, honored rules return;
now a new lineage is sent down from high heaven.

War Weary?

2272458246_b77147169e_zIt seems Washington is convinced that America is war-weary. It’s not a completely inane remark. But I’m not sure that it is exactly accurate either.

I don’t think there is any doubt at all that America is very tired indeed of watching as Washington sends our matchless military into conflicts with one hand tied behind their backs and dragging a weight around behind them. That’s some idea of what the rules of engagement (ROE) that we have forced them to operate under have done to them. Not to mention the number of our guys killed and wounded (often catastrophically) to assuage the conscience of some twit in DC who couldn’t figure out (with the manual) which end the bullet comes out of.

If you say we are tired of fighting wars by rules that politicians designed without reference to the real world. We’d plead guilty, or I would anyway.

I think America is plenty tired of watching our military to which we have given our best young men and women and a large amount of our treasure, be wasted on doing silly crap like trying to build Iraq and Afghanistan into little United States, I’d say Yep, I’m weary of that as well.

You see in this Colin Powell was wrong (he was wrong about a lot of things actually), we’re America, if you anger us enough to get us to  come over and blow your little sandbox to smithereens, it’s your problem, we have no obligation to rebuild it. You angered us deeply, we broke it, you fix it if you can, if not, well, too bad. Let that be a lesson to you, Don’t make us come back. Mostly we figure if all you idiots would settle down, get jobs, or do something productive, pretty soon you’d have enough money to not want to break the china, but maybe that’s just a rule for the civilized world.

I don’t think America is really war-weary, we still love watching our guys do their thing, and making the world safe for Americans. We’re tired of the nonsense we talked about above, but I’ll bet we’d almost all enjoy sitting mesmerized again, as we were watching our guys and girls parade across the Iraqi desert a few years ago, and I doubt many of us will really forget the looks on the crowd’s faces as old Saddam’s statue came tumbling down. I liked that feeling, it had something of Berlin, 1945 about it.

Now they are trying to tell us that the war against ISIS will take at least three years. Three years–why? We gonna build new factories in Kurdistan first, and then recruit Koreans to fight and wait for them to walk over. Or maybe we are going to keep calling one bomb an air raid.

By the way, why are we using smart bombs or Hellfire missiles on a pickup truck with a machine gun and a short squad of idiots, in the middle of the desert? Yeah it makes neat videos, but 50 or so rounds of cal 50 would be at least as effective, and a hell of a lot cheaper

Here’s an even better idea, turn loose the Air Force, and the Navy, for say a week, every sortie they can manage, every target we can find. After that week, we ask anybody who’s still around if they want some more. If they do, how about a Marine Division through Iraq, another one through Syria, and say an armored corp through Kurdistan, should have it done in a couple of weeks. A month at the outside.

Three years, my foot!!

Let’s see, on 7 December 1944 (that’s three years after Pearl Harbor for you kids) Germany was just getting ready for its last gasp in the Battle of the Bulge, on the frontier of Germany itself, the Russians were rolling through East Prussia with most of their troops in GMC deuce and a half’s, and the officers in jeeps. Germany was a smoking ruin, the air forces were running out of targets, and mostly shooting up trains and making the rubble bounce.

On the other side of the world, The Imperial Japanese Navy, the remnants that hadn’t been sunk, was rusting away at its piers, out of fuel. The liberation of the Philippines was well in hand, next month North field on Tinian will welcome the 6th Bomb Group, which will commence to start burning down Japan which is already starving because of the American submarine campaign.

All of that was accomplished in three years, seventy years ago. They must have been supermen compared to us, huh? Since it will apparently take us that long to conquer a piece of the middle east the size of the United Kingdom and held by irregulars with ragtag equipment captured from here and there, instead of two of the foremost militaries in the world in 1941.

And I’ll bet that’s a lot of it as well. Americans are an impatient bunch, we got places to go, people to see, tyrants to topple, and all the rest. We don’t have three years to play around in some damned sandbox.

And if anybody is stupid enough to use the phrase ‘Boots on the ground’ in my presence-he won’t do it twice.

Let’s try something completely novel here. How about this: Decide what we need to do, and then decide what we need to do it. You know, instead of deciding we’ll put in ‘A’ so maybe we can do ‘B’, but what happens when ‘C’ unexpectedly does ‘D’. Now what are you going to do, Genius?

Or maybe we are just tired of leadership that can’t tie its own damned shoes, and is more worried about its cronies getting rich(er) than about the guys carrying the rifles. Maybe war really is too important to leave to the politicians (or the political generals).

“George Patton pick up the red courtesy phone, please.”

Strategy and Stuff

B52BomberOK, I gather we lost our strategy for ISIS, maybe it got left in the Roosevelt room or something, but the President can’t seem to find it. That’s bad, things work a lot smoother when you have one.

See, a strategy is nothing more really than a plan for a specific area. We should have several running right now, one for Russia-Ukraine, one for the Mexican border, one for illegal immigration, one for countering ISIS, and to be honest, one to get your favorite Congresscritters reelected. If you’re a Democratic president, I might perhaps agree with some of your goals, although it’s very, very unlikely I’ll agree with all of them. I rather liked John Kennedy for not entirely valid reasons but, I didn’t agree with everything he wanted to do. Similarly with Reagan, although I agreed with more of what Reagan said than I did with what Reagan actually did. That’s life, essentially, we all have to deal with it to make this Leviathan called America work at all.

But what I’m really concerned about here is ISIS. What, Mr. President, do you want to happen to them? I have my givens and druthers, and so does pretty much every American, and likely every middle east resident, and European as well. There some people out there that think the proper thing is to convert and surrender, there are also people who think a few hundred megatons of nuclear fire from space will fix it. I’m somewhere in between, so likely are you, and most everyone with a couple of brain cells to rub together.

See the problem is, what is the overarching thing we want to do with them; whether it’s degrade and manage them or drive them to (wouldn’t through be better in that case) the gates of Hell. Or I suppose we can stick our head in the sand and hope we live till your replacement shows up, that’s highly unrecommended, though.

Likely, I’m different from most Americans, I don’t, in general, care if anyone likes us or not. We’re not running for Miss Congeniality here. I want everybody from the most American loving Brit on the street to our worst enemy in Damascus (or Moscow) to be afraid. Not only afraid of what he thinks we might do but especially afraid of what we might do that he never even thought of in his worst dreams. That save lives (ours). The thing is when you get right down to it, in a war zone there are only two animals, ‘sheep’ our people, civilian and military, and ‘goats’, which defines as everybody else.

It’s desirable to not kill too many non-combatant goats, it’s easier on the conscience and generally less of a health hazard, but it’s not a critical thing, ask the Germans who survived Dresden in 1945, if you can find one. Uncle Billy said it “War is Hell”. And Americans have been pretty good at proving that since long before there was an America.

Now pay attention here, Mr. Obama. I don’t want you up there blathering about how Company C of the 506 PIR will do such and so. One, you don’t know what you’re talking about, and second, I have no need to know, and its better for the sheep if the goats don’t know. I need to know, really know, that you’re going to fight the war through to victory, somehow. That’s all, really. I know it doesn’t sound like much. But it’s apparently a big deal, because you, and your predecessors, back to Truman in Korea, especially the ones with a D behind their names, have never managed it. Granted the Rs haven’t been all that much better, but they seemed to have some clue.

A tip from the old Soviet Union seems in order here. You see the Sovs were a thoroughly political culture, every damned thing was political, kind of like Washington is now, maybe even a bit worse. That sort of thing leads to believing your own bullshit, which works short-term at best in politics. Long term it brings you to 1989, oops! But if you do that in a wartime military you get dead rather quickly. The Sovs recognized that, and their military ran on ‘objective conditions‘ in other words the truth, or as close to it as they could get hold of. I recommend that policy.

What would I like to see done. I’d like to celebrate 9/11 this year. Maybe with some fireworks. Like every strategic bomber in the inventory (read that as every airplane that can both get there and carry a bomb) over Syria/Iraq (the parts being destroyed by ISIS) taking out every obvious emplacement, every leadership group, every communication node, every group of more than 5 rifles. Yeah, we’ll miss some, and we’ll kill some innocent people but, you know probably not as many as ISIS will in the next month.

The last plane in parachutes a big billboard down to the survivors, it says this, from AoSHQ

35 Posted by: ace at September 04, 2014 01:02 PM (/FnUH)—-

Pithier version.

Invade their land.
Flatten their capital.
Kill their leaders.
Hang a sign on the gate.

“Up to you now. Don’t make us come back”
Leave.

Posted by: fixerupper at September 04, 2014 01:04 PM (NaV4z)

Emphasis mine.

On Friday the 12th, call Putin and ask very nicely, “Hey Vlad, are you going to behave in the Ukraine?” and hang up.

A Century of Progress; Not

Hindenburg and Ludendorff 1917

Hindenburg and Ludendorff 1917 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

At the end of August 1914, Imperial Germany lost World War I, so did Imperial Russia. And even more they did it in the same battle. Talk about no winners at all. OK, let me explain.

In the opening moves of the Great War, Germany all but stripped the Eastern front of troops to make the Schwerpunkt through Belgium heavy enough to win the war. The Germans were pretty confident, and looking at the way it was going, it’s hard to disagree. They had 34 Corps with 2 or more divisions each in the attack, nearly a million soldiers, to compel the French surrender and make peace with Britain and Belgium, and then it would be time to run back across Germany and defeat the Russian Army. It was about as good a plan as could be devised, although the British going to war was a nasty surprise, and led to some delays.

But my main point today is that the Russians managed to get a couple of huge armies moving toward the German 8th army (4 and a half corps, a cavalry division and the Königsberg garrison). And the German general commanding (von Prittwitz) wasn’t up to the job. He got relieved, von Hindenburg was recalled from retirement, and Ludendorff brought back from the Belgian forts,

As he was driven back, German refugees were scattered around Germany, great ladies from East Prussia filled the Kaiserin’s ear with their tales of woe, and the German’s managed to scare themselves into moving three corps from the western front to reinforce 8th Army. Von Hindenburg tried very hard to tell them he didn’t need them, to no avail

And that’s why Germany, lost the Great War, their only chance to win was for it to be short war, and without those 6 divisions the Allies managed to hold (just barely). But they couldn’t win either, and so Europe bled itself white, until the Americans showed up. The whole thing turned into a tragedy that we are still paying for the consequences of today, not least in the Middle East.

And the Russians? Von Hindenburg fought them at Tannenberg, 95,000 Russian troops were captured, 30,000 were killed or wounded, and about 10,000 escaped, thus setting the stage for the Russian Revolution.

Those unneeded German troops were back in the line in a little more than a week, it was too late.

via Great Satan’s Girlfriend.


Of course the boundaries of the Middle East were set up based on Anglo-French treaties after the war. They had nothing to do with much of anything in the real word. One squiggle in one of them is supposedly because Churchill’s pencil jittered. Of course the whole system has pretty much come crashing down in the last six years. It worked fairly well when a benevolent superpower, first Britain, and then the United States, kept it mostly sane. But now, Britain has cut back, and our president (according to reports) simply can’t be bothered.

I note that some analysts are beginning to wonder whether he is physically capable of making a decision. It a concern that came up occasionally about whether such and so would be able to order nuclear release, but this isn’t even a full conventional war, let alone that.

Reports say he has been getting reports on ISIS for a year now, in the presidential daily brief. I have my beefs with American intelligence, mostly I think the rely too much on overhead imagery, and communications, and not enough on what people think, but I have strong doubt that they missed this, so it has to be that somebody wasn’t paying attention.

The State Department spokeschick seemed so proud yesterday that we’ve run something over a hundred bombing sorties, so far, while declining to call it a war. Well, I sort of understand, Congress hasn’t said it’s a war yet, course they haven’t asked for them to either. I have trouble understanding why there isn’t a carrier battle group (or two) in the eastern Mediterranean, nor do I understand why we aren’t running a hundred sorties per day, some of them B-52s and such. but you know, I was brought up that when you find you must fight, you fight to win, all the way to victory. maybe I’m simply old-fashioned but, it worked for thousands of years.

All I know is what I read in the open press, or see on TV but given the givens; the ineffectual means in the Middle East, the lack of enforcement of immigration law, the completely open southern border, and the almost guaranteed certainty that ISIS people have taken advantage of that, and the anniversary of 9/11. I think the only correct advice is to “Keep your head up, your butt down, and check six.” Because I think we’re going to take a hit, and it just might dwarf 9/11, or it might not, cause I don’t know any more than you do. And if my name was Obama, I’d be rather worried about how I was going to explain the loss of the Capitol two hundred years after the British set it on fire.

 

Labor Day

English: Col. Theodore Roosevelt. Crop of Imag...
English: Col. Theodore Roosevelt. Crop of Image:Theodore Roosevelt, 1898.png with minor Photoshop cleanup עברית: תאודור רוזוולט (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In North America today is Labor Day. If you’re a Canuck you can put the ‘u’ back in there for yourself. Theodore Roosevelt was a practical sort of man. Nobody ever accused him of being lazy but he also didn’t believe in doing useless work either. So he took a bunch of useless vowels out. Now you know why Jess and I trip each others spell checks a lot.

Here’s why Time thinks we celebrate Labor Day.

The first Monday of September means that white clothes are out, sales are in, summer holidays are over and classes begin. For many of us (but far from all of us), it’s a welcome day off of work or school, ahead of what is likely to be a busier month than the last.

Well, OK, I suspect they are sort of correct although I fail to see why we need a holiday that celebrates organization that protect the lazy and incompetent, you know like unions do. Mostly, I think we just needed a holiday to mark the end of summer. And to finish up the back-to-school shopping.

Of course, the schools have been known to jump the gun and thereby make this simply a long weekend, snow days have to come from somewhere after all.

In other news, Glenn Reynolds over at Instapundit thinks the cure over at Rotherham could well consist of rope, lamp posts, and officials, with some assembly required. I have trouble disagreeing.

Perhaps we should expect no more when community preservation is outsourced to bureaucracies, but the unavoidable reality is that on many occasions, Rotherham police came upon children being sexually exploited—in some cases, in the very instance of being raped—and arrested no one. The perpetrators are Pakistani; they might call us racists. The children seemed to consent. These gangs are violent.

All of which amount to an admission by those police officers that they are cowards, and something less than men. I’m reminded of the janitors who discovered Penn State coach Jerry Sandusky’s rape of children, and who said nothing, for fear of losing their jobs. They were cowards too, and deserve to be remembered as such.

Happy Saturday, Finally!

Redneck environmentalism? You bet.

Tip of the Stetson to Cultural Limits at Rat Nation

w6408

And I think I’ll move to the Republic of Bill

 

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