“A product that is coherent in form requires no embellishment.”

This 1963 photo shows Ferdinand Alexander Porsche leaning on a Type 901 Porsche. The creator of the legendary Porsche 911 died at the age of 76, the car manufacturer announced Wednesday. (Porsche AG)

This 1963 photo shows Ferdinand Alexander Porsche leaning on a Type 901 Porsche. The creator of the legendary Porsche 911 died at the age of 76, the car manufacturer announced Wednesday. (Porsche AG)

One of the legends of the automotive world is gone.

Ferdinand Alexander Porsche, who designed the first 911 sports car and went on to found a consumer products design firm that also carried the Porsche name, died Thursday in Salzburg, Austria.  He was 76.

Born in Stuttgart, Germany, he was the eldest son of Dorothea and Ferry Porsche, who along with Ferry’s father Ferdinand Porsche founded the business that grew into the sports car maker.

Porsche grew up in the auto business and during a turbulent time. His grandfather designed the original Volkswagen Beetle for the Nazi regime in Germany in the 1930s as well as tanks that were used by the Germans in World War II.

As a child, “Butzi” – as he was known to his family and business associates – enjoyed designing and building his own toys. He attended the Waldorf School and studied at the Ulm School of Design before starting work in the design department of the auto business in 1958.

Porsche officials recall that he quickly demonstrated strong  design skills by producing the first plasticine model of a successor to the 356 series – the 40- to 60-horsepower sports cars the automaker was developing at the time.

The Porsche 911, developed directly from the model and his drawings, was shown for the first time in September 1963 at the Frankfurt Motor Show.

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His work speaks for itself and need no embellishment from me. As he himself said (completing the quote of his which titles this post)

“A product that is coherent in form requires no embellishment. It is enhanced by the purity of its form,” Porsche said of his design work. “Good design should be honest.”

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2 Responses to “A product that is coherent in form requires no embellishment.”

  1. Pingback: Tragedy Comes In Threes – Thomas Kinkade, Ferdinand Porsche, and Jim Marshall « Passive Interests

  2. Pingback: So, Oatmeal wants a love story about cagefighting nuns and tanks… | Jessica Sideways.com

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