Guilds, Licensing, Inspections, and Code, Oh My; part 1

The National Electrical Code, 2008 edition

The National Electrical Code, 2008 edition (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

[Author’s note] Because it’s late, and I’m tired, I decided to let this go out as it is, written from memory of a lifetime spent in the industry. So, there might be a few minor factual errors here but, this is exactly what I’ve told innumerable clients over the years]

Guilds and Licensing

You’ve often heard me say that trade licensing is like nothing so much as the medieval guilds. Here’s why.

You decide you want to be an electrician, so you go get a job with one or you go to a community college, now you can get your apprentice card, you lucky boy or girl. Either way once you’re on the job site, you’ll carry parts, run a broom, maybe bend some conduit, dig a trench, the stupid stuff that young people always end up doing. That’s fine, it’s been that way forever, I did it, and so did my dad.

You keep doing that for a few years (it varies with school or pure apprenticeship) and you’re qualified to take the journeyman test. They claim it has some electrical knowledge on it but, for the most part, it’s a code test, which is important, but not the be all-end all you think. Let’s say you pass, many don’t, 5 or  times isn’t uncommon. I think it’s a ridiculously stupid test and open book at that, but it’s not up to me. Now you’re a journeyman.

As a journeyman you can supervise three apprentices (these are all Nebraska examples) in theory you could be in charge of wiring the new skyscraper in Omaha, as a 25-year-old journeyman. (Don’t worry, you won’t be, usually that job will have 50 or so electricians on it). But most likely you’ll be in charge of a crew, and as you learn what you’re doing your responsibilities will increase. It’s not all that bad a system.

The next step, and many never take it, is to take the contractor’s test, it’s a little more difficult but not much. If you pass, and buy insurance you can be an electrical contractor. Woo-Hoo!

Say you decide to go out on your own, which is really the only point to that license, you might be a good electrician, many are barely OK and lazy to boot in my opinion. But here’s some things you need to know:

  • How do you do a fair estimate?
  • How do you figure out how much of which material to use? [Most house plans leave all that up to you, and if they’re three or more ears old, they’ll need revision for the current code cycle]
  • How do you figure a fair return? Not that you’re going to get it on residential work.
  • How does accounting work?
  • What do you have to do to comply with OSHA?
  • What is and when do you have to apply NFPA 70E or NFPA 101
  • What is the UL White book, and why does it matter.

My point is, there’s a lot to being a contractor that a journeyman rarely sees.

Oh, did I mention that your present contractor has to sign off on you taking the test? That’s where the guild thing comes in. It’s nothing less in my mind, than using the government in restraint of fair trade.

Inspections

Here inspection is done by the State, and they’re pretty good, knowledgeable, fair, and consistent. Just about all you can ask, really. Or is it? See the thing is, their job is to enforce the code, period. And as we’ll talk about in the next section that introduces some problems.

What I would like to see is this, when you buy a home, if you want insurance (and most mortgages require it) why couldn’t the insurance companies require that electrical, plumbing and whatnot be brought up to code, using their own or contract inspectors, which would mean that every once in a while homes would get inspected and not the messes that some so-called handymen leave behind them.

Nothing new about this either. When I was young, nearly every factory in America was insured by Factory Mutual. Factory Mutual not only required compliance with a very strict code, that covered lots of things, they even had their own labs for rating products, and if your product didn’t have a F-M label it couldn’t be used. But if you complied, the insurance was pretty cheap. Why? Because the losses were low. You know, the free market at work.

Codes, Codes, and more Codes

Residential

For the most part electrical work is covered by the National Electric Code (NEC, NFPA 70), it’s a good code. Like it plainly states it is not a design manual, although if I want the job, I’m usually not going to go very far beyond it. If wired in accordance with the code, your house will be safe, it may be adequate and convenient, or it may not.

But there are problems. If your house was wired in the 50s or before, it may still have a 60A main, you will find it inadequate. If I remember the code started requiring 100A in the early 60s as it still does. So if you have that 60A service, usually it will have two sets of cartridge fuses labeled main and range, which is what they are normally used for, in addition it will have four of the old plug fuses, we call them Edison base, same as a light bulb.

Here’s the kicker, say you blow a fuse, and you call me, and by some miracle I can come right over, if that panel shows any sign of overloading, like too big a fuse for the wire size, or pennies behind the fuse, or even if it’s hot (and I’ve burned myself on a few). I can do one of several things, I can replace all the fuses with the proper size Type S fuse and its adapter, so that you can’t overfuse, although you’ll be very limited on load, I can replace the panel, or I can refuse to work on it. That’s it.

The best option for Joe Homeowner is to replace it. That’s problematical too though. In the current code I have to protect just about every circuit in the house with either a Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) or a combination type Arc Fault Circuit Interrupter (AFCI) instead of using a regular circuit breaker (I can’t even buy a fusible panel any more).

GFCIs work fine here, no problem, it’s one of the very few ways I can replace a two wire outlet as well. AFCIs can be an entirely different kettle of fish. Invariably if I try to put one on the old cable with the woven covering, it won’t work, it could be something as minor as a staple driven too tight or something. If I’m in that spot, from the get-go, I’m going to tell you, you have to rewire your house. You really do need to anyway, but here we are talking about it on a cold winter’s night while we watch your pipes freeze.

OK, that’s settled, right? Oh, you want an estimate or a bid. OK, that better for both of us, anyway. It’s gonna cost you about $5000 dollars, more or less.

Why?

Because times have changed, in 1965 or so we went to grounded outlets, first with a small conductor and then with a full size one, it was a very good idea.

In about 1980 we started required bathrooms and kitchens to have GFCIs essentially wherever we are within six feet of water, and in the basement, garage, and outdoors. Again a good idea.

Now we require AFCIs on almost anything else in a dwelling unit. It’s not a bad idea, they detect an arc in the wiring and shut off the circuit.

Not least of the problems is that instead of about $5 for a circuit breaker, these (and GFCIs) are about $50. They also change some of our methods of wiring, and yes the new ways are more expensive in both time and material but, it can’t be helped.

Now the fun begins. Under the code certain things are required.

  • An outside light, wall switch controlled at each entrance
  • An outside outlet, as described above
  • Outlets not more than 12 feet apart in all rooms of dwelling units, including any wall more than 18 inches long, except some halls and stairwells.
  • Wall switch controlled luminaires, or in some cases outlets, in all rooms, controlled at each entrance.
  • Bathroom circuit, 20A GFCI cannot serve anything else (sometimes it can serve another bathroom)
  • Kitchen, 20A GFCI, outlets every 24 inches over the countertop (not excluding that fancy island), two circuits required minimum.
  • There are limits as to how many outlets can be on a circuit 7 for a 15A circuit if I recall.
  • Any appliance that has nameplate that calls for a separate circuit, has to have one. Invariably dishwashers, garbage disposers, freezers, furnaces, and icemakers do
  • A laundry outlet that serves nothing else.
  • Usually, I’ll spec a circuit for the refrigerator because they don’t always play nice on GFCIs or AFCIs and I hate call-backs.

So where are we, somewhere in the neighborhood of a dozen or more circuits, electric dryer add 2, electric water heater add 2 more, air conditioning add 2 more. If I remember, and I’m writing this from memory, the biggest 100A box I can buy has about 15-20 spaces in it, and it’s very poor design not to leave room for expansion, so you’re looking at a 200A service. In truth, I haven’t recommended anything else in 20 years, and I’ll bet those that insisted on saving that 50 or so bucks regret it now.

Did I mention that I have to use tamper resistant outlets too. It’s not a big thing, only about a dollar more per outlet.

So after you cry for a while (I don’t blame you for it either) you say OK and pay the deposit which will be in the neighborhood of $2500. Now we can pull the permit and get started.

Everything I’ve mentioned above is required by code. I and the inspector have no choice. What we used to be able to do is to stage it, we could figure out the whole job, change the panel now, and rewire later, and occasionally it still can happen. Oh don’t forget to schedule the drywall guy and painters, cause we’re going to damage your walls.

But, here’s the problem, remember where we started this story, when I walked in, I burned my hand on your panel. Let’s say you just got a job that pays say $10 dollars an hour, and your house payment is $300 a month. How are you going to be able to pay me? Short answer is, you can’t. I know it, you know it, and the inspector knows it too. But we’re all stuck.

Thing is, a competent electrician can do other things to make it reasonably safe, without all that drama. But the way the code is written we can’t.

That’s one of the reasons I like the system I outlined above, when you’re buying the house, you’ve got options, maybe the seller will help, in the worst case maybe you can include it in your mortgage,  instead of trying to do it right now when you have a problem.

Basically, we’ve made code compliance so expensive that we are leaving very dangerous situations in homes, because no can afford to fix them. The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) in their quest to make electricity safe for a two-year old, have priced fixing actual real world hazards out of reach of the average homeowner.

The next time will be Agricultural and Commercial.

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About NEO
Lineman, Electrician, Industrial Control technician, Staking Engineer, Inspector, Quality Assurance Manager, Chief Operations Officer

24 Responses to Guilds, Licensing, Inspections, and Code, Oh My; part 1

  1. This all sounds very complicated, Nebraska. I’m thinking when you come down to re-wire my house, let’s keep it simple. For tools just bring some wire, a pair of pliers and strippers. It’s okay if you damage my walls, I’ll just slap a piece of woodwork over that part. And if you happen to burn your hand, I’ve salve in my first aid kit. 😉

    Seriously though. Great post, Sir.

    Like

    • Works for me Simone 😉

      Like

  2. Not much to say here: so when are you coming to bring my electrical up to code? I could probably keep you busy for 2 or 3 days and the martinis are on me. 😉

    Like

    • That’s not the worst offer I’ve ever had but, I’d better try those pig snouts first. 🙂

      Like

      • Shucks, I’ll splurge and give you chitterlings!

        Like

        • Better and better 🙂

          Like

        • I thought I could find something to entice you! 🙂

          Like

        • I’m cheap but I’m not easy. 🙂

          Like

        • I know. That’s why I’m pulling out all of the stops.

          Like

        • That’s all right, I’ll nail you on mileage! 🙂 The super duty too heavy to push.

          Like

        • And I though you were still using mule teams out in Nebraska. I was going to throw in a load of hay.

          Like

        • Nope, my F-550 is considerably faster, better heater, too.

          Like

        • Nothing like the smell of riding behind a team of mules though to make a man feel like a man. Diesel just doesn’t have the same earthy appeal.

          Like

        • It’s still pretty manly though, and people will let you in the door. 🙂

          Like

        • No problem here. I’m an equal opportunity employer! 🙂

          Like

        • My kind of guy 🙂

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        • There you go! It’s settled. I’ll start mixing the martini’s in preparation. 🙂

          Like

        • 🙂

          Like

        • 😎

          Like

  3. mstrmac711 says:

    When I first learned my trade (submarine auxiliaryman) everything we did was done with the knowledge and training we had at the time. That included working on refrigeration systems without worrying about exposure to freon, lagging without the elaborate asbestos tents and containment, cleaning shit tanks with a pair of rubber gloves, and on a few ocassions cleaning up a few “spills” without the proper gear. We were around torpedo fuel, missile gas, something called monoethylalamine and potassium hydroxide. I can’t imagine what the kids are doing now…

    Like

    • Same here, Mac. when I started we still had transformers filled with PCBs, Asbestos insulation as well as lead, and we didn’t even think about arc-flash, except to be taught to stand to the side of the disconnect as we closed it. I’m amazed that the kids can manage to get anything done, even if they knew what to do, that isn’t a given anymore either.

      Like

  4. Pingback: CODE CHANGES AND COST CHANGES » Electric Authority

  5. Pingback: Jobs?, Not In This Country « nebraskaenergyobserver

  6. Pingback: Nebraska Repeals Strict Licensing Laws for Hair Braiders | nebraskaenergyobserver

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