Cantor vs. Brat and Cloward-Piven at the Border

So, Eric Cantor lost his primary last night. Yep, the House majority leader lost to a guy running a pure grassroots campaign without hardly any outside help. Why? Partly, I think because he had become of Washington over the years, and Washington is nothing if it is not overtly arrogant to the citizens, and these citizens had reached their limit. But there are other things as well, many of them. This is one of them. These are some of those illegal immigrant children that Obama has invited to join us, without the slightest concern about what is to happen to them. It’s going to get worse, much worse.

There is a deep longing in this country for the “Rule of Law” which has been on the missing list for quite a few years. The average citizen recognizes (far better than he articulates) the founding principles of this republic, and knows perfectly well that rule by the princeling and his court is not the way that it supposed to be, he also knows that it is ineffective for any goal that may allowed to see the light of day.

I think we may be seeing a seismic shift actually, all across the so-called free world, that isn’t so free anymore. We see it Cantor’s loss last night but, we also see it in Cochran’s pending loss in Mississippi, we see it in Ben Sasse here in Nebraska, even as we did in Deb Fischer two years ago. It’s pretty obvious in Texas. But while America is deeply involved, it’s not only in America. It even doubtful that America is leading, for the moment that would be Canada and Australia. But the grassroots fire is spreading pretty widely, I think there were some sparks in the recent European elections as well. I have trouble relating to politics in continental Europe; their background and heritage is different. The UK is quite like us, and I find myself drawn strongly, as an American conservative, to UKIP, what I know of their goals are far from incompatible with maintaining freedom. To me the Tories have always what we tend to call the GOPe, and used to call the Rockefeller wing, which has always tending to be the party of crony-capitalism, fair enough it descends from the Whigs.

One of the things that is driving this, on both sides of the pond, is uncontrolled immigration, and another common feature is the elites description of any opposition to their plans as racist and/or politically incorrect. Well we all know, or we should, that when a man (or woman) has no effective argument, he starts calling names. So it is here.

John Hayward had a wonderful article at Human Events on the Cloward-Piven strategy, and how its application on American immigration is being implemented to use American’s basic decency against them, and especially against the very fabric of society. It follows, read it, and draw your own conclusions.

Back in the Sixties, Marxists Richard Cloward and Frances Fox Piven came up with a great strategy for overloading and collapsing democratic welfare states, paving the way for socialist tyranny.  Basically, the idea was to hit the system with a tidal wave of demands it couldn’t refuse, and couldn’t possibly fulfill.  The Left would then insist that the moral argument for the system remained intact, so the only way to meet those impossible demands was to scrap every vestige of Constitutional restraint and republican self-government, instituting a totalitarian system that in theory would forcibly restructure society to promote “fairness” and give all those government dependents what they “deserve.”  In practice, of course, what you actually get is an iron-fisted dictatorship that cooks up reports to make itself look good, or simply tells the unhappy citizens to shut up and obey when things deteriorate to the point that no volume of phony reports can paper over the problems – say, when the glorious worker’s paradise of Venezuela runs out of tap water.Cloward and Piven were specifically interested in replacing welfare programs with a government-guaranteed annual income for everyone – an idea that still emerges from the more absurd quarters of the Left occasionally – but the basic idea of overloading the republican system and replacing it with centrally-planned tyranny can be applied in many different ways.  Take a look at the humanitarian crisis on the southern border, which I wrote about two weeks ago.  It has since burst onto the front pages with some astonishing stories, including leaked photos of illegal alien children – many of them 12 years old and younger – “warehoused” in overcrowded facilities, where there are growing concerns about sanitation and disease.  CBS News in Houston writes of unaccompanied minors sleeping on plastic boards in a Nogales, Arizona warehouse after being flown in from south Texas.  According to some estimates, there are nearly a thousand children in that warehouse now.

There’s nothing complicated about what is happening here.  Barack Obama invited these people to send their children to the United States as refugees.  He’s already made illegal use of executive orders to gut the immigration system; he’s talking about doing it again, and the people of South and Central America can hear him just fine.[…]

via Cloward-Piven at the border | Human Events.

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26 Responses to Cantor vs. Brat and Cloward-Piven at the Border

  1. Mike says:

    It is genuinely amazing to watch this happening right in front of us. It seems all efforts to disguise the intentional, slow, methodical push of the United States into a Democratic Socialist Country have been abandoned in exchange for a full out sprint.
    While I appreciate the honesty and clarity provided by the Left by doing so, I only hope it draws the attention of those of us who believe in the founding principles of this country like a Cheetah on it’s Prey.
    These are interesting times.

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    • NEO says:

      Yeah, I like their clarity as well, it’s much easier to fight an open enemy.

      It seems, maybe, that the people are waking up. There’s enough light for a what may prove a false dawn but, it gives hope, anyway.

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  2. Yes, the Colward-Piven modus operandi has been embraced by Valerie Jarrett and her puppet Obama (and all his appointees) in this decidedly Marxist regime. It stretches all across the board: from food stamps, obamaphones, distribution of wealth etc. When you add the illegal alien problem to this with, free lawyers, healthcare, food stamps etc. how much is enough? When the owners of our debt decide to pull the plug it will unravel very quickly. We don’t have the money and no plan on how to repay our debts and become financially stable. Trust only lasts for a short period of time when one proves to be unworthy of trust time and time again.

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    • NEO says:

      You parallel my thinking on this almost exactly. I’m getting very close lately to:

      “Let it burn
      Scatter the stones
      Salt the earth where it stood”

      I’m not quite there but, I can see it coming.

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      • Ann Barnhadt has been there for a while. She says that she doesn’t expect to live a very long life; she might be right.

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        • NEO says:

          She may well be right. I think there is hope, but unless many more wake up, I think it nearly over. I see this morning that the Polish government is forcing Catholic doctors to perform abortions, irregardless of their beliefs, not a good sign in a country that so recently was strongly religious.

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        • Not shocking after the article I linked to about the forcing of the Lutherans to perform same sex marriages in Denmark (where Lutheranism is a state religion). Coming here? Probably, eventually. But I fear England is next because of the state religion problem.

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        • NEO says:

          I do as well, the CofE is not doing a good job of stating their belief, if they really have any-in the hierarchy, we know better about the member, or at least some of them.

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        • True, Neo. Makes me wonder how many will follow C out of the CofE if this continues.

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        • NEO says:

          Some, I think, although it depends a lot on the alternatives on offer. Lutherans are the closest, and there are very few in the UK, although some good ones. We have the same problem, in truth, although in the country we have sort of shelved by the synod system.

          Final analysis: It depends on the local priest/minister what happens in the congregation/parish, that’s why I’m still in the ELCA, and I’d guess has something to do with Jess in the CofE as well. That’s why we have almost no archbishops; they tend to be more trouble than they are worth.

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        • I think you are right in specific cases such as Jess. But I wonder how many are in her special situation. Sounds like she has an unusually conservative community there. I doubt that there are a large number of those that are available if they are suffering from what we are here in the U.S.

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        • NEO says:

          I don’t know either, nor do I really know the composition of the membership the ordinariate had to hurt some. There’s also the fact that her RCC parish priest sounds terrible.

          Churches are like politics in this respect; it’s all local really, the superstructure doesn’t really affect local congregations, at least in the protestant world. RCC, I don’t know enough about to even speculate.

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        • You’re right about the RCC though that is not how the model is designed to work. It is an aberration that has reared its ugly head since VII and the ‘spirit’ thereof.

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        • NEO says:

          It’s actually a good model though. A Lutheran bishop has almost no power to affect the local churches, my church is quite conservative while the synod is almost as bad as the Episcopalians (and we are in communion with them) but all that happens is that the mission giving goes down, part of that is that the local churches hire their own pastors, and they are always hired in line with the local beliefs.

          When I joined we were between, and our supply pastor was a quite high church Episcopalian, and a female, I liked her quite well, she was a good pastor.

          I understand your feelings on V II, and in many ways agree with you but it’s also important to note that C and I both found the RCC very offputting before it. There were things done that shouldn’t have been, but change was needed, I think.

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        • Actually to your last paragraph, I feel it is only a matter of education. Both of you when you went did not understand what was going on and found it off-putting which is natural when we confront that which looks different and is new to our religious experience.

          I was a bit different when I was a young lad and went to the old Latin Mass. Although I too did not quite get what was going on, it struck me that there was something very holy going on there. That stuck with me as a remembrance of that experience. It was different but it was reverent, beautiful, and almost other worldly. Being the type person I am, it impressed me even though I was totally confused about all that took place.

          After learning about it, it was so moving that I must confess, I had tears rolling down my cheeks for most of the Mass: and I was a man in my late 40’s that hadn’t done that or felt those emotions for many, many years.

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        • NEO says:

          I agree with you on the old Mass, in my case it was more the local priest. Yes the Latin especially was confusing but I had no doubt that it was reverent and to the same God I worshipped, in fact even the liturgy wasn’t all that different.

          Mostly different taste, I think, I think I would still not be overly happy with it every week, and the new mass sounds atrocious, worse, much worse in fact than a proper Lutheran liturgy. Take this as I mean it, cause I’m not trying for offensive here, a bit too much hocus-pocus for me, guess I must be a Protestant or something 🙂

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        • Too much dumbed-down silliness in most cases for me. After Communion this last Sunday the choir began singing something as banal as Michael Rowed the Boat Ashore (I can’t remember what it was thankfully but I’m sure you know the tune). I left and went to the memorial at the Church to my old mentor Msgr. Hamburger and offered by prayers and asked him (being a priest forever) for his final blessing as it is not good form to leave before one gets the final blessing at Mass. But I, in good conscience, could not have my moment after Communion ruined by sheer silliness. 🙂

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        • NEO says:

          That seems to be what i hear from most of you, we have some of it too, of course, but our heritage of traditional hymns helps us some, although some pastors seem to think the are far too common, those pastors tend to find themselves unwelcome after a time, usually. 🙂

          All we can do really, is try, I suppose. Mostly, I think we’ve had it too easy, and we’re going to pay for it. We always do.

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        • We will. I think that is one of the saddest things that has happened in the wake of VII: the lack of beautiful and meaningful music. I doubt any Christian tradition had as a large a collection of traditional hymns and chants as those that were compiled into the Liber Usualis. But sadly, they gather dust in the Novus Ordo Church and are rarely used. Instead we get pablum.

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        • NEO says:

          Yep, many of our best were translated long ago from the Latin. It’s a problem, and I’m afraid it’s more generational than anything else, I doubt it’ll get much better in our lifetimes.

          I hated pablum, even when I was a baby 🙂

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        • Me too. Still do. 🙂

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        • NEO says:

          Haven’t had any in 55+ years, think I’ll keep it that way! 🙂

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        • Me too. Whether it is in the form of food or banal religious music. 🙂

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        • NEO says:

          Do well on the food, sometimes not so well on the banal religious music but, I try. 🙂

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  3. [children]that Obama has invited to join us,

    I’m no Obamaite but I don’t think this is fair or accurate statement. Like calling him the welfare president. With high unemployment and low wages and more retirees = more people qualify. Plus Obama does not fund welfare, the congress does. Deficit president? With millions of boomers retiring = more social security and medicare = more deficit.

    If Tea Party and Christian Right takes over republican party even more than now and nominates presidential candidate – Hillary wins. Cantor defeat shows that possibility. Republicans will then lose 1/3 of electorate because independents will not vote for right wing republican/Tea Party candidates. Plus if she gets 10 biggest cities in 10 states (think minority voters-democrat base) she wins electoral college

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    • NEO says:

      That is exactly what he did, Carl.

      And just like FDR he has prolonged the depression, instead of allowing the country to recover while not enforcing the law.

      You may be right, and it will be a Pyrrhic victory, because the country will not survive, as a free country.

      Like

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