Broad Stripes and Bright Stars

633701545In one of her first posts here, Jess said this:

When I was ten, I lived in America for a year – in the mid-West. I remember when we got to O’Hare airport looking at its size and marvelling; it seemed bigger than the town in which we lived in Wales. I recall going to St. Louis and seeing the Arch, and going up it and looking across the vastness of the city and asking my mother: ‘What is America for mummy?’ I can’t remember what she answered – she probably thought it was me trying to be clever; but it was a real question, and one I came to ask a few times whilst I was there.

I think I asked it for the reason many foreigners ask – there is something different about America.  I remember going with my mother to a Kiwanis Club and being stuck by the way everyone put their fist on their breast as they swore the oath of allegiance to the flag. Indeed, I was so impressed that I memorised it so that the second time we went, I could do it too.[…]

This

I think she had a point, America is special, and it always has been, ever since the first settler came, and one of them a stern preacher named John Winthrop (by the way, he was born not far from where Jess lives in England) said this.

For we must consider that we shall be as a City upon a hill. The eyes of all people are upon us. Soe that if we shall deal falsely with our God in this work we have undertaken, and so cause him to withdraw his present help from us, we shall be made a story and a byword throughout the world.

That still, 400 years later speaks to us, doesn’t it? We Americans are of the elect, our ancestors chose for us to be by coming here. And that is why so many of us care so passionately about America. That is much of what motivates me in writing here. And it is an American thing. You don’t see Europeans worrying much about morality, ethics, or indeed freedom in their lands. We’re different, and we always have been.

And this weekend is our birthday party. Yes we started from the English concept of freedom, fair play, and justice but, we have kept far closer to it, than even they have. Much of that, I think is the wisdom of the Founders in writing it down, and making it difficult to change. But enough.

Let’s party!

But before George M.we had already fought our hardest war, with ourselves

And more after

One of the unique things about us is our love of our armed forces, particularly when you realize that the Founder’s detested a standing military. But they have proved to be the best friends freedom ever had.

But it’s not all guns, God and soldiers, either, It a beautiful place

Are we perfect? Nope. we’re just people who try to do the right thing. One of the bloggers I most respect Cassandra at Villainous Company wrote this yesterday

I love my country not because she is perfect, but because she wants so badly to be. I even love her faults, even the kind of obsessive navel gazing angst that mistakes fallible humans and imperfect realization of our ideals for evidence of pervasive moral rot and in so doing, makes conscience the scourge that would make moral cowards of us all…It is a dangerous moral equivalence which is so afraid of sinning that it would not kill a rabid wolf, lest it starve the flea on its back.

America is not a destination but a journey and in loving her, we must not become so firmly fixed upon the goal that we lose heart when we stumble a time or two upon the road. For stumble we will. After all, we are but human; all too imperfect clay with which to form the more perfect union our founding fathers envisioned.

I love this country because she was born in turmoil; baptized by fire and lighting; conceived from the highest aspirations of Enlightenment thinkers: words that ring as true today as they did over two hundred years ago:

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. –That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, –That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness.

After everything, those words can still bring tears to my eyes. America is a nation of idealists, founded by men who risked their lives and fortunes to reach for something the world had never known before. Something that is spreading like wildfire across the globe.

Democracy, with all its faults and upheavals and failures. And successes.

May it ever be so.

And that about sums it up.

But certain songs have become America to the world, and to us as well

And some speak of that Banner of Freedom, and our hopes for the future.

And some of the best were written by that American, who will always be known as “The March King”.

Happy Birthday America

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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About NEO
Lineman, Electrician, Industrial Control technician, Staking Engineer, Inspector, Quality Assurance Manager, Chief Operations Officer

8 Responses to Broad Stripes and Bright Stars

  1. Happy Independence Day America!

    Like

  2. the unit says:

    Again I’ll come back to see all the videos. I’ve seen the Red Skelton and one about “Over there.”
    I watched Andre Rieu Stars and Strips. That’s a good start. Wonderful. I love people who could’ve been my little brother. 🙂

    Like

    • NEO says:

      Yep there’s a bunch there, and in truth I wanted to put more in. 🙂

      Gotta love that old American music. 🙂

      Like

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