A Time for War

A US flagAngelo Codevilla has thought, like most of us, about ISIS. Like most of us, also, he sees problems ahead. He also sees a path to victory, and victory is the only useful term in this context.

 If You Want To Stop ISIS, Here Is What It Will Take

The Islamic State’ video-dissemination of one of its goons beheading an American is an existential challenge from which we cannot afford to shrink. Until the Islamic State ISIS/ISIL/IS did that, it made sense for the U.S. government to help contain it because the Islamic world, which the IS threatens most directly, must destroy it sooner or later. But internetting that beheading was a gory declaration of America’s impotence—a dare-by-deed that is sure to move countless young persons around the globe to get in on killing us, anywhere they can. The longer the Islamic State survives, the more will take up its dare. Either we kill the IS, or we will deserve the wave of terrorism that will engulf us.

Killing the IS requires neither more nor less than waging war—not as the former administration waged its “war on terror,” nor by the current administration’s pinpricks, nor according to the too-clever-by-half stratagems taught in today’s politically correct military war colleges, but rather by war in the dictionary meaning of the word. To make war is to kill the spirit as well as the body of the enemy, so terribly as to make sure that it will not rise again, and that nobody will want to imitate it.

via If You Want To Stop ISIS, Here Is What It Will Take.

I think he is correct. We can denigrate the force of the murder of an American, if we choose but, to other people around the world, is was a taunting of an impotent country, essentially a bully kicking sand in our eyes. Most of us know about that, from either our experience, or friend’s experiences. We also know that it only ends when superior force is applied, thereby punishing that behavior.

But how does one apply that in international relations? Just as Mr. Codevilla says, or in other equally effective ways. We are the United States of America, nothing exists in this world without our (at least tacit) approval. Do we approve of this behavior? We do if we don’t respond properly.

The way its supposed to work for a global superpower, whether it’s a Roman Legionaire, or an American Marine, is this. That Marine walks down the gangplank of the ship, airplane, whatever, and the entire country cowers in fear. Why? Because the Americans are coming, and everybody know that they are either your best friends, or your worst enemies, and what are we? Have we done enough to earn their friendship.

Now granted, that’s a major change in how our elites think of us. It requires a pride in America’s past, and a belief in America’s future. Not the tendency to blame everything in the world on America (and Britain). Can they make that change? I have doubts. But there are plenty of Americans who can, perhaps that murder in the desert also marked a turning point in the life of the nation. Pearl Harbor saved us for a generation but, we started slipping back under the Nomenklatura‘s sway when we didn’t fight Korea to win, and further, much further, when we allowed our government to throw away our victories in Vietnam, and Iraq, and Afghanistan.

Much of this will be an air war, and it is ideal terrain for it. Interestingly, we won air superiority in about March 1944 of Europe, without it the invasion would have failed, we have never relinquished it.

Mr. Codevilla has here shown us one strategic plan, no doubt there are other viable options. But that doesn’t really matter, yet. What matters, as it always has, is will. Will to fight, will to persevere, and especially the will to win, not on points, as it were, but a complete, undeniable victory.

Ecclesiastes 3 King James Version (KJV)

To every thing there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven:

A time to be born, and a time to die; a time to plant, and a time to pluck up that which is planted;

A time to kill, and a time to heal; a time to break down, and a time to build up;

A time to weep, and a time to laugh; a time to mourn, and a time to dance;

A time to cast away stones, and a time to gather stones together; a time to embrace, and a time to refrain from embracing;

A time to get, and a time to lose; a time to keep, and a time to cast away;

A time to rend, and a time to sew; a time to keep silence, and a time to speak;

A time to love, and a time to hate; a time of war, and a time of peace.

And now, it has become a time for war, that in time there will be a time for victory, and then a time for peace,

all in their appointed hour.

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About NEO
Lineman, Electrician, Industrial Control technician, Staking Engineer, Inspector, Quality Assurance Manager, Chief Operations Officer

10 Responses to A Time for War

  1. America and the Allied Air power pretty much decimated the Iraq military in Kuwait, in Gulf War 1. It would be even more so today with ISIS, but we must have the will, as some Allies!

    Like

    • NEO says:

      The will, aye, and that is what is lacking, I fear. The war itself is simple, as it would have been in the Rhineland in 1934, if we wait for 1940 it won’t be so easy.

      Like

  2. the unit says:

    Been a long time since fight to win. Rules of Engagement have become Terms of Endearment. Well, ‘Lookin’ for Love in All the Wrong Places’.

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      Yep, it’s time to go all 1942 on them.

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      • the unit says:

        Yeah, I was conceived on Halloween ’41, deposited June ’42. Trick or treat. 🙂

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        • NEO says:

          A treat, decidedly 🙂

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        • the unit says:

          Thank you. 🙂 Pardon me if I don’t take a bow. I been turned off to bowing these last nearly six years. Or was that a curtsey he did?

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        • NEO says:

          Understandable, my friend 🙂

          Like

      • Least we forget, 1942 was a rough year for both the British and the American military! Indeed both were fighting hard and long, but loosing men along the way. But thank God both prevailed in the end! The cost of true freedom is never cheap! The amazing cost of American airman over Germany is remembered with the many American graves in Britain! RIP!

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        • NEO says:

          Very bad, Herman Wouk had a character remark at the New Years’ Eve party a the Army-Navy Club in Washing ton, “Plenty of hell behind, and plenty in front as well.” So it is now.

          And yes, Cambridge is on my must do list, if I ever get to England.

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