American Ingenuity and Winning Friends

"No one cares about us, and no one understands exactly what happened, because we are Yazidis. Everyone wants to kill us. Where should we go? I don't have a dream because I don't have a life. That's all I have to say." I think we can do much better Photo courtesy of "Spirit of America"

“No one cares about us, and no one understands exactly what happened, because we are Yazidis. Everyone wants to kill us. Where should we go? I don’t have a dream because I don’t have a life. That’s all I have to say.”
I think we can do much better
Photo courtesy of “Spirit of America”

A while back, Jessica wrote a post entitled We’re Americans, We Act, As always with her articles, it is excellent. it deals with the problems last summer in northern Iraq, and don’t kid yourself, those problems are still there, we have perhaps helped hold the ring, but it ain’t all sweetness and light. Much remains to do.

You’ve all heard me complain about elephantine American/multinational big business and how the little guys can run them into the ground six days a week and twice on Sunday as well, given a level playing field. Nothing has changed on that front either.

And we all know that a S&P 50 firm is agility itself compared with the US Government, even that part that works fairly well, which would be the US Military.

But all problems have solutions, if we have the vision to see them but, that’s the hard part: seeing them. Well actually it’s not, our young men and women in the military, with their butts in the weeds are as adept as anyone in the history of the world at “improvising, adapting, and overcoming”, that’s one of the main reason our military is justly feared by our enemies.

But they are too often stymied by the elephantine bureaucracy of the Pentagon, and even so, some of the things that Captain Lunchbucket thinks would help him get along with his new neighbors are not things that the taxpayers should be buying but, neither should the Captain’s wife, really. Talk about a nightmare, how about a Pentagon program to supply 50 softball bats to a village in Afghanistan? It would likely be cheaper to airlift them to Colorado and give them a lifetime income.

But the American soldier has always been America’s best ambassador, everywhere he goes, his basic goodness reflects well on us, and people are drawn to him. In fact, when I was young I knew many men who flew in World War Two in 8th and 9th US Army Air Forces, the two based in England. they were proud of what they had done in the war. But the ones who had stayed in were even prouder of what they had done in 1948. In something called Operation Vittles, where we (and the British) completely supplied the city of Berlin during the blockade. That was a mission a man could really be proud of. But even in that one, the story we all remember is the pilot who bought candy out of his own pocket and airdropped it to the kids watching the planes land. Improvise, Adapt, and Overcome, indeed.

So how do we harness American entrepreneurial skills to the young soldiers’ needs in the field? We know we can’t do it with a Pentagon program, too slow, too expensive and other reasons as well.

Here’s one way that has worked for 13 years. From the Hoover Institution and the Wall Street Journal learn about Spirit of America and its founder Jim Hake.

American ingenuity: winning friends and influencing people since 1776 (at least).

Here’s the link to Spirit of America

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About NEO
Lineman, Electrician, Industrial Control technician, Staking Engineer, Inspector, Quality Assurance Manager, Chief Operations Officer

39 Responses to American Ingenuity and Winning Friends

  1. Did you want me to write a post for our blog, dear friend? xx Jess

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      Always and whenever, dearest friend! Just give me a little notice so I don’t stomp on it. 🙂 xx

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    • NEO says:

      I should probably add that I have you Palm Sunday one from two years ago scheduled for Sunday-sort of a lead in. 🙂 xx

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    • I am confused, I thought this avatar was Jessica’s? And what is the connection with “newenglandsun”?

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      • I copied it and am being her doppleganger for the day.

        Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          And her much improved doppelganger!

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        • I’ll be certain to tell jrj1701 that I fooled you.

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Oh, the shame of it all 🙂

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        • I’ll be back in a few months. When you least expect it. xx Jess

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          And it will be a wondrous day, indeed. I hope I can wait. 🙂 xx

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        • To add to your shame, Bosco didn’t buy it for a second.
          https://bozoboy87.wordpress.com/2015/02/05/good-brother-chalcedon/
          Check the most recent comment.

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        • I thought I was having a “nightmare”! Btw, I wonder what the real Jess thinks?

          Liked by 1 person

        • The real Jess is away from computers and possibly will never find out. Mum’s the word! 🙂 xx

          Liked by 1 person

        • I doubt that! Thank God there is NO “doppleganger” for the “irishanglican”! Though I have been hacked a few times strangely, and one pretended to be me! That was a nightmare, but I will not give-up my handle, for that really is who I am! I have considered making it my .com? But, I am hardly a computer guy! I have even considered giving my wee web-blog to a younger friend? Time will tell, as we look to moving perhaps to Canada? Though he is an Evangelical, he is not an Anglican, historical or otherwise.

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        • “he is an Evangelical, he is not an Anglican,”
          to say that someone is Evangelical and not Anglican is meaningless as the first Evangelicals were Anglicans. To say someone is Evangelical but not Anglican is a better statement.

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Actually, you’re wrong you know. We Lutherans beat you to the evangelical title by a few years, Henry was a bit slow off the mark. 🙂

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        • I was speaking of the Evangelical Movement which, in technicality, was started by Wesley. And technically, the Apostles were the first “evangelicals” under that moniker.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Of course my point was that there are many kinds of Anglicans these days, “he is not an Anglican, historical or otherwise.” True Anglicanism is both classic & historical and evangelical, to the Book of Common Prayer, as the Anglican Thirty-Nine Articles! The so-called High Church Anglicans came later of course, affected by “Catholicism”! And the Wesley brothers were NEVER High Church!

          But yes, good old Dr. Martin Luther, that great Reformer, so affected Archbishop Thomas Cranmer!

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        • Anglicanism was founded by St. Augustine of Canterbury and has an essentially Catholic/Orthodox heritage. There is no dispute about that.

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        • That is certainly only true in the Catholic sense with Canterbury and before the Reformation! And surely Augustinianism is long gone for the most part with the Anglo-Catholics (and the Ordinariate), at least in any Reformational sense. “And the original formulation of Anglican principles is to be sought in the reign of Elizabeth I rather than that of Henry VIII or Edward VI, for it was under her that a “via media” between the opposing factions of Rome and Geneva (later called the ‘Elizabethan Settlement’) became a political necessity and Anglicanism as a doctrinal system took shape. It formularies, including the Book of Common Prayer, the Ordinal, the Thirty-Nine Articles, and two Books of Homilies became from Elizabeth’s reign the basis of Anglican self-understanding, preaching, and doctrine.” And of course there were Calvinist influences, which were dominant, in the 17th century, also known as the Golden Age of Anglicanism! (See, The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church, edited by F.L. Cross and E.A. Livingstone, my copy is the Oxford Press Third Edition, 1997)

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        • St. Augustine of Canterbury. Not St. Augustine of Hippo of whom I believe you mean.

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        • Btw, we can surely see the loss of Augustinianism with Anglican’s and then Roman Catholic’s in people like John Henry Newman, who went though both. He was never much of an Augustinian really! But not so old Thomas Aqunais, who called himself something of an “Augustinian”! When I was a young R. Catholic growing up in Dublin Ireland, my pastor and priest, Fr. Sweeny was an Augustinian educated Irish priest, surely that was part of God’s providence for me! And He WAS surely too Augustinian theologically on the doctrine of Grace! But again, generally they are gone mostly now in the Catholic Church! Though old Benedict-Ratzinger was somewhat close on grace to some degree with some aspect of Augustine/Augustinianism, but he was too always effected by Catholic sacerdotalism!

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        • You’re an Augustinian and don’t even believe in baptismal regeneration? LOL

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        • And btw too, there was never any true Augustinian doctrine in Augustine of Canterbury, 6th cent., see the mass baptism in Canterbury with him and many there 597 A.D on Christmas Day! Sadly just more baptized like paganism, which we have seen for many centuries! Baptism for the real Augustine was always more of the ‘sign and seal’ of salvation, and even Luther understood this also! But “Baptism” has fallen on hard times today, without the true biblical and theological reality.

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        • “Baptism for the real Augustine was always more of the ‘sign and seal’ of salvation, and even Luther understood this also!”
          I do believe St. Augustine of Hippo was one of very FEW church fathers from the fourth century-fifth century who believed unbaptized infants would not make it to Heaven. Nice try though.

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        • Indeed NO Baptismal Regeneration for me! And old Augustine was surely inconsistent on this aspect of infants who die before baptism, he did not bring this into his general position and statements on Baptism however. It was sort of an aside! And of course later the aspect of limbo. There is no perfection in any of the so-called Fathers!

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        • Didn’t Chalcedon and I expose you as a fraud seeing as neither Manchester nor Cambridge awarded either the D.Phil. or the Th.D. and you claim to have both?

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        • And btw, the whole problem of any Infallible Church, rest with both Rome, and somewhat the Eastern Orthodoxy! It is simply a non sequitur (does not follow good logic), and of course there is NO real biblical argument here at all! The Reformed Church/Churches and Theology are quite on this one biblically & theologically!

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        • 1 Tim. 3:15 where the church is the bulwark of truth doesn’t count, eh?

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        • This comes off my own blog…

          For Luther, “The Sacrament fit into the frame work of “promissio” and “fides” (the Word of promise and faith), into which all of Luther’s theological statements fit.” Again, for Luther, ” (1) The Word confirmed by a sign was the most important part of the sacrament. (2) The Word had to be connected with a sign. (3) The Word, like every word, required only faith. The same was true of the sacrament. The principal distinctions between Luther’s view and that of medieval theology were: (1) For Luther the Word was the gracious promise of God directed to the gathered community, whereas the “forma” was characterized more by its magical effect. In fact the words of institution in the Mass were whispered like a magic formula by the priest. (2) The sacrament was not dependent on the minister and his “intentio”, but solely on the promise of God and the faith of the recipient. With this Luther equated the sacrament with the Word; it was for him, as it was for Augustine, “verbum visible,” the visible Word.” (Walter von Loewenich)

          Augustine’s “crede et manducati” (Believe, and you have received the sacrament). “The body and blood of Christ were signs that assured the validity of the promise the way a seal validates a will.” (Luther, WA 6) Indeed THIS was and is the Real-Presence for Luther, as Augustine!

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        • Btw NES, keep reading and studying, especially biblical theology! Only here is the true authority! 🙂

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        • I wrote a piece on my own blog about the whole British reality about the D. Phil. and Ph.D., with the Doctorate of Philosophy, which I have! I guess you missed it? Both you and Chalcedon have made dishonest and ignorant attacks! But, this is NOT the place for this again!

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        • Ph.D., maybe you have. But a D.Phil. and a Th.D. are two degrees which you do NOT have. Besides, why does someone with both a D.Phil. and a Th.D. spend so much time on his blog talking to HIMSELF?!?

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        • And of course one must exegete the Text of 1 Tim. 3: 15, so give it a shot! What does it mean?

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        • It means that the Church is the pillar and bulwark of Truth. How about YOU exegete it?

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        • NES: I have concluded that seeking to dialogue with you is a waste of time, sadly! The religious spirit can be a deadly place for certain people, and certainly the open blog! But, I do wish you the best ‘In Christ’!

          PS… Remember, I am 65, 66 this year and semi-retired. Perhaps older than your grandpartents?

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        • You are older than neither my maternal grandmother (in her late 70’s) nor my paternal grandparents (again, late 70’s). You are an arrogant and sad, sad, man. I pray for your soul.

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        • *parents

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  2. NEO says:

    Comments are closed. Check the commenting rules

    Liked by 1 person

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