Jeg onsker dere alle, “GOD SYTTENDE MAI!”*

Norsk flagAll across the upper Midwest today, and wherever else we have roamed, you’ll hear the phrase above. It’s important to us, it’s also a good reason to drink Aquavit, one of the few good things we got from the Swedes. You see, as all the Ole’s and Lena’s know, the 17th of May is Norwegian Constitution Day, celebrated here and at home as well.

Many people mistake it for Norwegian Independence day which it is not.

On May 17, 1814, after ratification by the national assembly organized by the independence movement on May 16, the new Constitution for Norway was signed. The reality that this Constitution came in context with a very strong movement in Norway for Independence from Sweden. Unable to gain international support forced  Norway after a short war to negotiate with Sweden.  Norway was allowed to keep its own Constitution, but had to accept the King of Sweden as its monarch. For more historical information and perspective, read, “Constitution of Norway” in Wikipedia.

So we were stuck with loyalty to the Swedish Crown until 1905. It was never all that popular but Norwegians being rather stolid, we soldiered on, and in good time…

This meant that  Norway was subservient to Sweden under the King of Sweden. The vision of and movement for Independence continued and was at long last brought to fruition on June 7, 1905 when, having revoked the Constitutional amendments which ended the “personal union” with the King of Sweden, the Norwegian Parliament took action to create an Independent  Norway with its own KING. This is a very complicated and interesting process with democratic ideas and processes pressing the whole process.

Norway did gain its own King! The Parliament invited Prince Carl of Denmark to become King. Understanding the Norwegian movement toward democracy, he said he would consider becoming the King only after a Referendum of the People of  Norway to vote on whether they wanted a Republic or a Constitutional Monarchy.

Coat of Arms of Trondheim

The PEOPLE of  Norway voted 79% for ththe Constitution. Prince Carl accepted election as KING of  Norway. He and his family came to  Norway. He was the MORE popular when he chose the historic name of Nowegian kings, “HAAKON” and became King Haakon VII of Norway. King Haakon VII took the OATH as monarch on November 25, 1905 – 2 days after he arrived in Norway from Denmark. King Haakon VII was crowned KING of  Norway at Nidarosdomen (the cathedral in Trondheim) on June 22, 1906.Excepted from:

Today is SYTTENDE MAI!

I suppose I could add here that my mother’s family is from Trondheim, the ancient capital while my father’s is from Oslo, the current capital.

Coat of Arms of Oslo

I read a story, which I believe to be true, that when during World War Two, King Haakon VII was holding court, in exile in Scotland, a young man, a member of the Resistance, who had been injured by the Germans and escaped, was brought to the King. At the door, he straightened up and despite grievous injuries to his leg, walked without a limp to the King. Afterward, he remarked that, “A man does not limp while his legs are the same length”. Such is the Heritage we have carried down from the Sagamen of the Viking age. And such is our reverence for freedom, independence, and written constitutions. We waited 90 years for a King of our own, who says perseverance, and steadfastness doesn’t pay.

O Valdres,  O Valdres, thou home in our hearts.

For immigrant families, an ocean apart.

Your valleys and mountains with lofty peaks high,

The mem’ries we cherish tho’ years have gone by;

O Valdres, your beauty is seen by day’s light,

Queen of the Valleys, a beacon at night.

For you now, O Norge, our hands cross the sea,

We all join together in one family.

Our homeland forever, our homage we give,

From all distant shores wherever we live,

O Norge, you call us from all walk of life,

In peace, love and joy, our hearts now unite.

Gretchen Dokken-Hellie

* I wish YOU ALL, “Good 17th of May!”

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About NEO
Lineman, Electrician, Industrial Control technician, Staking Engineer, Inspector, Quality Assurance Manager, Chief Operations Officer

29 Responses to Jeg onsker dere alle, “GOD SYTTENDE MAI!”*

  1. NEO: This has now become something of an inclusive holiday, yes? I have noted past problems with the use of foreign flags, etc.

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  2. cowboylawyer says:

    If I remember right, Newman Grove, Nebraska used to have two Lutheran churches, one Swedish and the other Norwegian. Intermarriage was frowned upon. I know a nice lady from there who is half-Swede and half-Norwegian. I don’t know where she went to church. Personally, I took Swedish as a foreign language in college. It does not come in handy very often, but it pleased my Swedish gramma. Jag kan inte tala Svenska mychet bra.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Btw note the history of Lundensian Theology! Early Lutheran as I remember. I have noted however, that some form of Methodist’s have been rather Norwegian, yes?

      Liked by 1 person

      • cowboylawyer says:

        I don’t know nuthin bout that stuff. I was told that the Swedes and Norwegians could not be in the same Lutheran Synod until the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America was formed as a result of a merger.

        Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          That’s pretty much true, although the old American Lutheran Church had a fair number of Dames and Finlanders in it.

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        • cowboylawyer says:

          Yes, but not Swedes. I think the ALC was formed before the LCA. The Augustana Synod passed up the ALC and joined the LCA. Both were formed in the 60s. My gramma was suspicious of the Danes too. If someone was named Petersen, she would ask if it was spelled sen or son. Peterson was acceptable, Petersen not so much. She was not prejudiced, just aware of her ethnic superiority. Now I have come a long way from the Swedish clannishness — I married an Italian Catholic girl. Her family has been tolerant of her marrying below her station in life.+

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Yep, that’s pretty much what I know as well. i carry one of the patronymic names, and I still ask, not all that prejudices, mostly curious. My ex is a Bohemian and I grew up amongst Prussians, my best friend is a Brit, obviously I’m doing something wrong! But at least she lives in the old Danelaw 🙂

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        • NEO: So what is your Lutheran flavor? Friendly question btw.

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        • NEO says:

          For the moment, at least, I’m ELCA

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        • http://www.newworldencyclopedia.org/entry/Danelaw

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        • NEO: I see, thanks! I know some Wisconsin Synod Lutherans, whew they are hardcore for the most part! I’m too “eclectic” for them, even as a ‘neo-Calvinist’!

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      • NEO says:

        There’s some similarities but remember the Wesleys were CofE all their lives as well.

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        • Yes, Luther had a great affect on the Wesley brothers! Though John did read some Calvin also, with the Thirty-Nine Articles, which were surely more European Reformed in Cranmer’s mind and affect as he wrote the Articles. But indeed the greater effect was with Luther I believe!

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      • Lund, Theology of

        (Swed. lundateologi). Theol. of Lundensian School, which includes G. E. H. Aulén,* A. T. S. Nygren,* and Ragnar Bring (b. 1895 Skara, Swed.; Aulén’s successor at U. of Lund).

        The Lundensian School has tried to set forth a strictly scientific methodology to be used in systematic theol. Bring and esp. Nygren have tried to demonstrate positive relationships bet. theol. and other branches of scientific research. Nygren’s objective in earlier writings (e.g., Religiost apriori, 1921; Dogmatikens vetenskapliga grundläggning, 1922; Filosofisk och kristen etik, 1923) was to lay a solid foundation of dogmatics and ethics by means of a philos. of religion that can guarantee not only them but, on the whole, all kinds of science. The keynote of this speculation is the concept of eternity. It belongs, Nygren claims, to the religious sphere, but secures the validity of all other knowledge as well, since that which is true cannot be true or valid if it is not true always and everywhere, i. e., has the characteristics of that which is eternal.

        After trying to show a religious a priori, Nygren turned to the study of the hist. of ideas, to show how religion, or the religious a priori, is realized. He began the “motif research,” to which Aulen, Bring, et al. have made valuable contributions. Aulén broke with K. G. A. v. Harnack’s* interpretation of ch. hist. and showed that the Luth. Reformation* went back to the early ch. The best examples of the theol. approach of “motif research” are perhaps Nygren’s Agape and Eros and Aulen’s Christus Victor, the former a study of religious ideas of Gk. philos. and the NT that follows the hist. of religious motives until the Reformation, the latter an analysis and evaluation of the most influential ideas about the essential meaning of the atonement. Nygren sharply contrasts the Platonic idea of love* (eros) and the Christian agape. Whereas eros is a desire of good for self (man’s effort to ascend to God and, primarily, human love), agape is God’s way to man: free, spontaneous, unselfish, and self-giving love. Aulén emphasizes the “classical” theory of the atonement held, e.g., by Irenaeus* and Luther: the atonement is primarily God’s action taken in Jesus Christ to set man free from death, sin, and all destructive powers (see also Atonement, Theories of, 7; Christus Crucifixus). This classical theory is contrasted with more anthropocentric and legalistic views, e.g., of Anselm* of Canterbury. Similar ideas are set forth by Aulén in The Faith of the Christian Church.

        The Lundensian School strongly emphasized Luther’s theol. as the legitimate renewal of NT thoughts. Bring has contributed works on Luther (e.g., Förhaallandet mellan tro och gärningar inom luthersk teologi) which have stimulated further Luther research (see also Luther Renaissance). As to evaluation of Luther and Lutheranism, there is a marked tendency to stress that P. Melanchthon* differed from Luther and that the orthodox period (see Lutheran Theology After 1580) did not always grasp the depths of Luther’s thought.

        The foremost representatives of the Lundensian School have played an important role in contemporary ecumenical debates. Aulén’s and Nygren’s books have been studied as textbooks at theol. schools outside Swed. and outside Lutheranism. The Lundensian School has also met opposition, e.g., in the criticism of Gustav Wingren (b. 1910 Tryserum, Swed.; taught in Lund, Aabo, and Basel; prof. dogmatics U. of Lund 1951). GH

        See also Sweden, Lutheranism in, 6.

        A. T. S. Nygren, Agape and Eros, tr. P. S. Watson, 2 vols. in 3 parts, rev., and in part retranslated, and pub. in 1 vol. (London, 1953); G. E. H. Aulén, Christus Victor, tr. A. G. Hebert (New York, 1931) and The Faith of the Christian Church, 2d ed., tr. E. Wahlstrom from the 5th Swed. ed. (Philadelphia, 1960); P. S. Watson, Let God be God! (Philadelphia, 1947); E. M. Carlson, The Reinterpretation of Luther (Philadelphia, 1948); G. Hillerdal, “La théologie de Lund,” Positions luthériennes, V (1957), 49–61; G. Wingren, Theology in Conflict, tr. E. H. Wahlstrom (Philadelphia, 1958).

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        • And ya just knew I have read some of these guys (Nygren and Aulen). 😉 As too even Gustav Wingren! I also really like Yngve Brilioth!

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        • Btw, too, Zwingli anyone? Can’t leave him out, his affect was surely with Cranmer in places! Ya got love the breadth of Lund Lutheranism, which I think follows kind of close to Zwingli in places too. And here I see more of Wingren perhaps? Who was of course critical of classic Lind!

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        • cowboylawyer says:

          Thanks for writing that. It is interesting but I think I am in over my head.

          Liked by 1 person

        • CBL: Yes, Christian and surely Lutheran Theology can get heady! I like to look at it more from always the Pauline place and school, which was where good old Dr. Luther came from I believe. Btw, you might like the German Uno Schnelle’s work/book on Paul, Paulus: Leben und Denken, translated into English by Eugene Boring… Apostle Paul, His Life and Theology, (Baker, 2005, 695 pages). A nice read, and rather comprehensive and compelling, to quote Victor Paul Furnish, but again very readable!

          But see two of my favorite books on Luther, one by another German, Bernhard Lohse: Martin Luther’s Theology, Its Historical Development, (Fortress Press, 1999 Augsburg Fortress). And one by a very friendly Reformed scholar, Heiko Oberman’s book: Luther, Man between God and the Devil, (Yale University Press, 1989). The latter is without doubt one of my most favorite Luther studies ever written! And again, very readable, I would place Oberman as one of the best Reformational scholars in the late 20th and early 21 century! He died in 2001.

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    • NEO says:

      I think your right. I would have taken Norwegian but my choices were limited to French and german-I suspect you know what I took 🙂 Wasn’t much love lost amongst the cousins back in the day. Gothenburg a few miles from here sttarted as Swedish,never found all that much in common for this Minnesota/Dakota transplant.

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  3. the unit says:

    Well just Happy Norwegian Constitution Day NEO. I don’t know much history about that.
    A high school chum who was a medical student and became a psychiatrist married a beautiful blonde girl from Norway in the early ’60’s. They lived in New Orleans and somehow got involved with DA Jim Garrison, both of them not just the blonde wife. No one in our class has heard from them for 40+ years.
    “This blonde lady’s friend was somewhat injured and needed to go to the hospital for medical attention. So she eventually got friend to the emergency room. The nurse at the ER asked her why didn’t she just call “911” The blonde lady said “I couldn’t find the 11 button.” ” (not the one I knew, I don’t think)

    Liked by 1 person

    • I still love blondes! When I met my wife she was a strawberry blond, now she is a redhead! Her hair is also now down to her lower back! 😉

      Liked by 2 people

      • the unit says:

        Fine, like Crystal Gayle. No tattoos like J Lo though!

        Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      I think I dated that one back in the day, although it might have been her dumber sister.

      Liked by 2 people

      • the unit says:

        What a history lesson I getting here today. Thinking of blondes and where they came from, I went to Wiki, some interesting information.
        The blonde I dated years ago was from a wealthy family. Grandfather invented Campho Phenique. People are researching what his name was. I don’t know because of marriage. Her name was not his last name.She drove a ’56 Buick convertible, but didn’t know how to put it in park. Became a airline stewardess. Finally drowned in hurricane Katina in Pass Christian, MS in 2005
        And from Fr. Robert I learned about Ivar the Boneless, the first of republicans like Boehner. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kingdom_of_Dublin

          Yes we Irish had our pagans for sure! I believe it was Imar as Ivar?

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        • the unit says:

          Fr. Robert spelling from your link NewWorldEncyclopedia. Imar or Ivar? I have to look up how to spell Boehner anytime I mention him. 🙂

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        • Btw some say Ivar was “impotent”? If so? The Vikings had their straight out humor!

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        • the unit says:

          Fr. Robert, wouldn’t that be limp or flaccid humor?

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  4. Pingback: My Article Read (5-17-2015) | My Daily Musing

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