The Euro Crisis and the Return of Culture

eff6f2c4300ff7e790414467490de6b3_viewHere comes John O. Mcginnis telling us that Greek culture is not compatible with the European Union (EU). Frankly, I find it difficult to disagree with him. Europe is many things, and not a few of them are so different as to be nearly beyond comparison. In many ways, it strikes me as teaming a thoroughbred horse with an ox, neither performs to its potential, in fact it is often less effective than either alone. Here’s a bit of the article.

At least so far, however, The End of History has collided with history. Much of the Islamic world has not gotten the message. To be sure,  the fall of the Soviet Union has led to many ex-communist states with an admirable commitment to law and the kind of economics that gains long-term prosperity.   But there remains Russia, where democracy seems incapable of sustaining a loyal opposition, the state looms as leviathan, and the economy has large elements of a kleptocracy. Readers of Russian history should not be surprised. Richard Pipes has long argued that since the 15th century, Russian culture has been marked by disdain for rights of property and an enthusiasm for a patrimonial regime with little separation between state and economic and civic society.

But nothing better represents the failure of Fukuyama’s thesis than plight of Euro and the Greek crisis. The Euro was the monetary representation of history’s end in the birthplace of the West. Created by no single state, it was thought to advance markets by reducing commercial frictions in  the most cosmopolitan part of the world.  It was also part of a larger political project of deepening the union of European states.

The Euro Crisis and the Return of Culture.

True enough, I think, the cultural divides are pretty high between say Norway, Spain, and Greece aren’t they? It’s more than the weather, we’ve all been shaped by our history.

Writing in National Review, John Fund also has some thoughts.

Today’s referendum doesn’t have winners and losers,” claimed Greek prime minister Alexis Tsipris. That’s absurd. I can name one clear loser.

It should now be obvious to the Eurocrats in Brussels that their grand project of an increasingly centralized and integrated European super-state will be rejected every time that ordinary people are somehow given a chance to vote on it. If they represented a normal national government, the Eurocrats would resign in shame and embarrassment.

The Dutch, French, and Irish all voted against European super-state treaties, although the Irish were bribed into voting a second time and eking out a yes. The Danes, Swiss, and Norwegians all voted to not join the European Union. Now the Greek people, although many of them profess that they still want to be part of the EU, have effectively blown up any chance they can continue using the euro, the linchpin of the EU’s monetary policy.

Beware of Greeks Casting Blame

It strikes me that Europe just contains too many different ethos, ethics, and desires for one overall government to contain them, unless of course, it is so powerless to be meaningless. That is not what the EU looks like to me. It looks like an unelected élite that wants to institutionalize the worst of everyone into a government that will not satisfy anyone at all.

The Greek situation has no real solution, that will be acceptable to both the Greeks and the anybody else. That’s because Margaret Thatcher, diagnosed the problem long ago. Yes, it applies to all of Europe (and the United States as well).

The problem with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people’s money

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About NEO
Lineman, Electrician, Industrial Control technician, Staking Engineer, Inspector, Quality Assurance Manager, Chief Operations Officer

9 Responses to The Euro Crisis and the Return of Culture

  1. Cry and Howl says:

    You have an award over at Cry and Howl. Please stop by when you can to pick it up …
    http://cryandhowl.com/2015/07/09/the-2015-cry-and-howl-top-20-conservative-blog-award/
    Thank you for all you do.

    Liked by 2 people

    • NEO says:

      And thank you as well! 🙂

      Like

  2. Ike Jakson says:

    I Ilked yours Nebraska; hope you like mine:

    https://ikejakson.wordpress.com/2015/07/09/the-common-predicament-greece-shares-with-america/

    IkeJ

    Like

  3. the unit says:

    Looking left and right. Running low on my money. You mean I can’t count on somebody else’s money? I read a few sites saying put what you got in your mattress. But then read law may take it from you on the way home, as bank calls law about withdrawal. Looks like what’s mine is theirs no matter what!

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      Yeah, I don’t know, and I’m chary of giving advice anyway. Too easy for any of it to go wrong.

      Liked by 1 person

      • the unit says:

        Yeah, I fell for the “for better or worse” a few times. And it was really better the worse won those times. Now in the long run, the better has lasted 34 years. No advice, just endurance along the way…and no pressure cooker explosives. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • the unit says:

        Yeah, there is this Fisher guy offering advice if you got 500K. Ads in lot’s of places I visit. Is he a Prince in Nigeria? Yeah, got 500K in my wallet, doctor says that’s why my osteoarthritis in my hips hurts so much sitting down. /s

        Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Yeah, I see them also.

          Like

  4. Pingback: My Article Read (7-10-2015) | My Daily Musing

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