Why on Earth do You Want to Farm 2.0 | Gardens, Combines, and Memories

IMG_4790aThis gentleman, who I have just found thanks to Lafayetteangel, who earned her screen name this time, is like me a refugee from Indiana, who has found a home out here on the Nebraska prairie. He’s had many of the same experiences, and in fact, I suspect he lives less than twenty miles from me, judging by his pictures. Don’t worry I won’t tell ’em where to find you 🙂

In this, he captures something that I suspect a lot us feel, about whether we really make a difference. He grew up farming, and I grew up in a rural electric system (REMC for Hoosiers), And for both of us, the wonders of agriculture speak very loudly to us. Many of you know that my editor, Jessica, grew up on a farm in South Wales, and her longing for it is much like Doug’s (and mine). So here is as good an explanation as I’ve ever read of why we miss it so, and part of the reason we blog, as well.

Although I grew up in a rural Indiana community, farming was far from the first choice as an occupation for most of my classmates. It was the only life I had known up until then and I loved it, it was all I wanted to do with my life. As graduation neared and futures were discussed, many couldn’t understand my plans and asked, “Why on earth do you want to farm?” I was a bit quiet back then so I never really knew how to properly express what I felt. I had my stock answers, but they never really conveyed what it meant to me deep down inside.

It is only now, when I haven’t sat on a tractor seat in fifteen years, I feel I might have found a way to properly express those feelings and really answer their question. You see, I have come to realize I suffer a spring and fall depression when I see farmers in their fields, and I now realize it’s not I wanted to farm, but I needed to farm! As I am sure most farmers can attest to, I have a deep down need to grow something, to nurture it, be it plant or animal, and watch it thrive!

Like a photographer needs a subject, I need to see the first corn spikes poke through the ground, become definable rows, grow tall throughout the long hot summer and produce a beautiful golden ear in the fall.

I need to see the alfalfa green up in the spring, to see those first purple flowers pop open saying it is time to make hay. I need to have the smell of fresh cut hay greet me first thing in the morning as I step from my house. I need to see the barn fill with those green rectangles stacked neatly on top of each other in the barn, as the evenly spaced windrows disappear from the field. I need to stand in the doorway of the barn at the end of a long day and feel the satisfaction and aches from a long, hard, honest days work!

I need to see a field of wheat turn yellow as spring becomes summer. I want to stand in the middle of that field and listen to the plants rustle in a hot summer breeze. I need to scrape a few knuckles as I prepare the combine for the coming harvest. I want to feel the excitement of lowering the combines hungry grain head into an untouched field of those bright yellow plants as they sway back and forth under a noon day sun. I crave the smell of a wheat field being harvested, the sweat trickling from my brow on a day so hot you don’t even have to move to break out in a sweat, but the work must be done, so you do it.

Continue reading Why on Earth do You Want to Farm 2.0 | Gardens, Combines, and Memories.

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About NEO
Lineman, Electrician, Industrial Control technician, Staking Engineer, Inspector, Quality Assurance Manager, Chief Operations Officer

47 Responses to Why on Earth do You Want to Farm 2.0 | Gardens, Combines, and Memories

  1. “This gentleman, who I have just found thanks to Lafayetteangel, who earned her screen name this time, is like me a refugee from Indiana, who has found a home out here on the Nebraska prairie.” I thought my role as a Christian was to help others out even though I didn’t know what I was doing, lol.

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      if it is, and I​ think so as well: WELL DONE, my friend.

      Liked by 1 person

      • lol

        Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • PS I live in Indiana. I was born and raise here too.

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          I thought you were. BTW, I’m a Purdue (or Purdon’t, as we often said) alum.

          Liked by 1 person

        • I was born and raised in Lafayette, In (Purdue Country as some call it.). I now live in Fort Wayne.

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          My sister lived there for a time, long ago. her husband was the district (civil) engineer for the Pennsylvania Railroad, as I dimly remember her house backed onto Bypass 30. I grew up in Wanatah, where the Michigan Road crossed 30 (the old Lincoln Highway) as well as the Yellowstone Trail.

          Liked by 1 person

        • I don’t remember By Pass 30. It doesn’t mean I haven’t seen it. It just didn’t click in my mind.

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Probably doesn’t exist anymore 🙂 It went around the north side, a controlled access 4 lane, not far out. But before the Interstates and such! Kind of like bypass 52 in Lafayette, if you follow my reasoning.

          Liked by 1 person

        • I follow your reasoning. I-65 might of took some of by pass 30 out.

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          That’s my guess, If I get a chance, I’ll look at a map but I haven’t been to Fort Wayne in over 30 years and then I was out by the airport. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • I have been living in Fort Wayne for over a year. Still getting to know the area. I do know around the Dupont area makes me want to scream, traffic wise, lol.

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Downtown was always a mess, but’s that’s about all I remember. Dad used to do a fair amount of business with National Mill Supply, which was down by railroad station somewhere.

          Liked by 1 person

        • I don’t go through downtown unless I have too. I am a person of comfort. I like to avoid stress during traffic hours. I don’t know if National Mill Supply still exist. I am going to have to ask a friend about it.

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          I’m the same way, rarely worth it. They were an industrial supplier: chains, tools, that sort of thing, probably they don’t, Grainger killed a lot of them.

          Liked by 1 person

        • I am not familiar with Grainger.

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Not important, really, another industrial supply house. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • I guess you can tell I don’t get out much, lol.

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          LOL, I haven’t been in a consumer store (other than groceries) since Christmas, just different lives, and even then just once. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • When I was young I use to spend all day going to the stores. Any more two stores and I am ready for a nap, lol.

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          My ex cured me – she could spend all day shopping for a band aid, lol.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Oh my, lol.

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Yep.

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Well, you got me interested. I just spent some time on the map, and think I have sorted Fort Wayne out, mostly anyway. It’s too long for a comment but might make a good post, in the next few days. Fun stuff, to try to remember and fit it into what is there now. :).

          Liked by 1 person

        • I will be looking forward to it, :).

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          I think it will be fun. hope some others like it. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • People like fun, I have observed unless they’re a liberal

          Liked by 2 people

        • NEO says:

          That’s true, and most like looking back at what was, as well! 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • True, :).

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • Are you going to talk about the old fort here in Fort Wayne? I been wanting to go see it but haven’t yet.

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Perhaps, I haven’t seen it either. We’ll have to see how it goes but that is the beginning​ of it.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Ookie dookie

          Like

  2. the unit says:

    What an enjoyable Sunday afternoon you, Doug, and Lafayetteangle have given me. A much needed break from what I usually look into.
    My dad in his first years of work life worked at Union Fork and Hoe Company. His brother all his working life. Not much mention of it on the internet, may be today Union tools or combined with American Fork and Hoe Company.
    Anyway led me on to search where the handles for these tools came from and the history of the Ash tree. Norway…sure you know all about it. 🙂
    Enjoyed, thanks.

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      Yep, Union Tools, were, maybe still are amongst the best! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • the unit says:

        What an interesting journey I’ve been on today. These companies made the first Craftsman Tools for Sears, and bayonets for the wars. I have some sort of rake like tool that was dad’s. Five prong turn down at the head, prongs about five or six inches long. Can only guess it was to pull hay out of a bale. Never been useful in my yard. It is very old. I’ll have to see if any markings on it tomorrow.

        Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Sounds like a hay fork, but I’m no expert. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • the unit says:

          That’s what I think too. I ain’t a rapper, but know it ain’t no hoe!

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Nor does it sound like a pitchfork​, which was mostly used for manure.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Doug Lafuze says:

          It is a hay fork. In the days before balers, Dad and grandpa used a fork like that to spread the loose hay in the mow. Later, Dad and I used them in the upright silos to spread the silage around after we finished filling them to give the unloader a nice flat surface to get started on.

          Liked by 1 person

  3. Pingback: My Article Read (7-19-2015) | My Daily Musing

  4. Doug Lafuze says:

    I’m pretty sure my ex would disagree with the term “gentleman”, but I am glad you liked that piece. It’s a special one to me, that’s why I felt I had to rewrite it.

    Growing up on an Indiana farm I am of course familiar with REMC. Since we were the third and final farm on a short but worn out line, we were low on the priority list so after a bad storm, REMC was literally a four letter word in our house! 😁

    When I saw your handle and that you were in central Kneebraska, I figured you couldn’t be too far away. Someplace 25 miles from me came to mind first. Thanks for not divulging my secret location, although I’m pretty sure the only ones looking for me are debt collectors, and I think they’ve all found me by now! 😁😁

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      Mine would with regard to me as well!

      You’re likely 10 mi too far east but otherwise correct. 🙂

      Yeah that happens, that’s what priorities do. The other side is that I once laid underground primary on the ground for a couple miles (Palm Sunday 1965) to restore power to a member on life support, where better than a mile of line had disappeared.

      Enough of mine have found me to keep me broke well into the future as well. Thanks to my ex, and her shopping habits. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • Doug Lafuze says:

        We lived north of Williamsburg, and one year, in the early to mid 80’s we had a really bad ice storm and were without electricity for a week. House #2 on that line was inhabited by a sweet old couple. His health went down hill a few years later so REMC did replace our line after that so he would hopefully never have to go without like that again. We were moved up the priority list as well.

        Like

      • Doug Lafuze says:

        My ex had the same habits, and now I’ll be digging out for the next several years as well. I’m only dealing with debt collectors though, she got her student loan in the divorce, and uncle Sam isn’t as forgiving, especially since she isn’t making her payments. Lol

        Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Ooops on her. Yeah, he’s not forgiving at all.

          Liked by 1 person

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