From the comments

English: Picture of Billboard put up by the Un...

English: Picture of Billboard put up by the United American Committee given to me by the group itself. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Dan Hannan said recently that:

Americans are very good at assimilating newcomers. They go in for loud displays of national pride – flags in the yard and bunting on Independence Day and stirring songs – that strike some Euro-snobs as vulgar, but that make it easy for settlers to want to belong.

And that is true, we have welcomed and assimilated all sorts of people over the last 300 or so years. But can we assimilate a group of people who basically believe in a theocracy, and maintain our country, as designed?

My dear friend Isabella Rose commented on yesterday’s post to this point. She said:

It is such a sad mess. While I can understand that some Muslims might not sympathize with jihadis in their extremest measures, the problem is that it is fundamental to the Muslim faith to seek out the practice of Sharia law. I have witnessed this first hand in getting to know Muslims, and I have heard their explanations of how they are a people of peace, and not the monsters the media makes them out to be. Nonetheless, I have also heard them turn around and clearly state that if you offend them or your faith, you should be punished under their laws.

Their idea of peace is very different from ours. From what I have seen, a world under Sharia law would be a peaceful place to them. The problem is, can we accept the abuse of other humans in the name of their God? Do we want to be subject to their laws if a dispute should arise between us and them personally? They would want us to be, and to them, that would be peaceful.

I think we walk such a fine line here. On the one hand, they are human beings, who we must love. On the other, they are holding onto a belief system that is calculated to eventually destroy our own, and establish their religious reign. Sadly, this is the paradox that is so difficult in our world. Do we take the liberal approach, whereby we act kind to them but do not seek to also set limits and borders to their initiatives? Do we take the opposite extreme approach, whereby we retaliate by hating them all and being inhumanly cruel?

There are no easy answers to such complex questions. Sadly, prophecy is clear that eventually the continuing actions of Muslims will lead to an international war that will cause much loss of life and bloodshed. I feel as though I am living in a twililight zone, as the news unfolds what was once mere written words on a prophetic page of history.

I think that all we can do is strive for a balance, whereby we love them and pray for them in our personal lives, but find a way to charitably stand strong in our defenses against their errors. As for the greater arena of the international political spheres, I am just glad I am not in the shoes of those who have to make such fateful decisions. Yet in the end I am not unfamiliar with tough love, and if pushed enough, I can see where it may – very sadly – have to come to that. But who will we blame? The Muslims, or our world that has become so cold that it drives disillusioned young people to extremist motives?

I think she states it very well, and yes, I do agree with her as I often do. But what do we do? I don’t know, and I doubt anybody has really thought about it.

This morning Archbishop Cranmer also spoke of this. Here are some of his thoughts.

For the first time in almost 300 years, we’re facing a conflict that has a distinct theological and religious element which we have not faced before,” said the Archbishop of Canterbury in response to the Prime Minister’s statement expressing the desire of his conscience to bomb Syria. “Recent studies demonstrate the theological basis of extremist groups behind jihadist thinking,” the Archbishop added, mindful that ISIS/ISIL/Daesh clearly has something to do with Islam, even if politicians persist in their delusion that the Islamic State is a nihilist, godless, irreligious death cult which has “nothing to do with Islam”, which is a religion of peace, prophetic benevolence and infinite mercy. Archbishop Justin probed further:

Does the Government realise that in facing this conflict there must be an ideological response that is not only national in dealing with the threat of extremism here, but is global in challenging the doctrines that draw so many people to support ISIS internationally? And what steps are they proposing to take to put together the conflict at the ideological and theological level, as well as at humanitarian and military?”

As we move inexorably toward bombing Syria – which the Archbishop acknowledges is “almost inevitable” and which action he fully supports – we would be foolish to ignore the “distinct theological and religious element”, which bombs will not eradicate. Indeed, military conflict with the infidel West represents an Islamist theological apocalyptic consummation: those who reject the dominion of Allah and the mission of Mohammed are kuffar. What Mohammed did to unbelieving Meccans is what Daesh must do to the profligate Jews and Christian prostitutes of Paris, Brussels, London, Berlin, Rome..

There can be no refuge or safe havens for Christians in the Middle East without the hard power of military intervention, but bombs produce collateral damage, and the blood of innocents is inescapable. Yes, we might degrade ISIS/Daesh in the short term, but the theological narrative and dream of the Caliphate will simply slumber to wake another day.

Source: BOMB SYRIA? AIRSTRIKES AGAINST ISIS WILL NOT ERADICATE ISLAMIST IDEOLOGY

So what should we do, as American, and as Christians (most of us)? It starts, I think, with prayer for us to see the way forward. I think bombing may be useful, but it is not the answer, I also think ground troops will be required. Neither are they the answer, really, unless we are with the Bishop of Béziers, Renaud de Montpeyroux and say, “Kill them all, God will know His own”. I think we are better than that, or at least I hope and pray we are.

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About NEO
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30 Responses to From the comments

  1. The problem is the loss of God, and even the loss of the Judeo-Christian Doctrine Of God! Again, the West is surely in the sway of Apostasy! And THIS can only be brought under the Judgment of God! And it is surely coming, as we can see the ‘Day of the Lord’ approaching! (2 Thess. chap. 2) Come Lord Jesus!

    St. Paul’s Second Letter to Timothy is profoundly prophetic here, at the End of the Age!

    And even in our Lamentations, the biblical & revelatory GOD is GOD: “Thou, O Lord, remainest for ever; thy throne from generation to generation.” (Lam. 5: 19)

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  2. Thank you for that NEO, and for your support of my thoughts.

    “Yes, we might degrade ISIS/Daesh in the short term, but the theological narrative and dream of the Caliphate will simply slumber to wake another day.”

    Not true. Not, at least, in this same way as far as I know. Prophecy is very clear that eventually the Muslims will be driven out of Europe into North Africa, after which there will be mass conversions to the Catholic faith. Only small pockets of Muslims will remain in the east, but from what I understand, they will not wake again in this same way. Later will come the end of the world, apocalypse scenario, and I do not know what role they will play if any there. But there will be a period of peace where the Catholic religion will flourish, much better than it is today in many ways (more loving, holy, more saints, etc.), and our troubles with the Muslims will be a thing of the past.

    I agree with you that we do need to pray. I think we need to try to put Mary’s peace plan from Heaven into practice from Fatima, because from what I understand, until the consecration of Russia is done, we are all in for one terrible time. The consecration of Russia will not be done until enough Catholics are living her plan, so I guess the most important thing for us is to at least pray and strive for love in our own lives, and trust in God. I know we want to find answers, but He already has them.

    God bless you NEO.

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      You know quite a lot more of prophecy than I do, and I haven’t heard it said that way before. I hope your understanding is correct, it sounds a lovely world. 🙂

      Good place to say how much I’ve missed your contributions to the discussion as well. 😀

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      • Thank you NEO. It is good to talk to you again (contribute) too. 🙂

        I do not know as much as I would like, but I have read enough to get the gist, and certain more focused points. It does indeed sound like a lovely time to be alive. I wish I could be apart of it, and see the Catholic Church the way She really can be.

        Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          I suspect we all do, even if we’re not Catholics in this lifetime. often, that’s how we start with thing that interest us, and as time goes on, we fill in the gaps, or not. It’s all good, I think!

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        • Yes, time can definitely fill in a lot of gaps. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Indeed, for all of us. 🙂

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        • 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

  3. Dream on! The Roman Catholic Church is itself part of the great Apostasy today! And I was raised Irish Roman Catholic in Dublin, but thankfully left in the 1970’s. Of course not all Catholic’s are “apostate”, but sadly this whole idea of “Christocatholic-Islam” surely is, which is part of this pope “Francis” and the Jesuit social gospel!

    And again, Russia and Putin will also be part of the end-time, with Putin, or whoever leads Russia into the attack/attacks on Israel! See the prophecy against Gog (Russia) in Ezekiel chap’s 38 &39. Again Russia with the northern (European) powers will attack Israel during the ‘Day Of The Lord’! THIS is true Prophecy, and part of the Word of God! (Rev. 19) “For true and righteous are His judgments, because He has judged the great harlot who corrupted the earth with her fornication; and He has avenged on her the blood of His servants shed by her.” (Rev. 19: 2, NKJV)

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    • NEO says:

      I learned long ago to never bet, long term, against the catholic church. I also not that I expect my friends to treat each other with respect, Father. disagreements are fine, but personal attacks will not be tolerated, and Isabella is one of our oldest and dearest friends..

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      • This is NOT a personal attack, though surely one was veiled towards me already! And the true Church Catholic sure “ain’t” Rome! Yes, I will stand with Luther and the Reformers here, if that makes me a disagreeable cuss? Well so be it! I will move on! And I learned a long time ago that the Biblical Truth always makes a dividing-line! Semper Fidelis!

        Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Calm down Fr., you and I express ourselves quite strongly, I surely as much as you. But Isabella, on occasion takes thing personally that you or i wouldn’t, and I’d be unhappy if she disappeared again.

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        • I am always “calm”, at least for an old Bootneck (RMC). And speaking the truth as one sees it, especially us pastoral and theological types, requires “thinking”! I hope our friend can hang in there? 😉 After all, we will lay both ourselves and what we have believed at the feet of Jesus/Yeshua! God Bless all of those who are ‘In Christ’! 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          I do as well. I think she will!

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        • And lest some think I am an anti-Catholic here, let them read the “Old Ox” himself: Thomas Aquinas, who called himself an “Augustinian”. And here were both Luther and Calvin, i.e. Augustinian themselves! But where is Augustine in the Catholic Church today? And of course here we are speaking about personal salvation!

          *Let me recommend old F.C. Copleston’s book: Aquinas, (A Pelican book, first edition 1955, of which I have a first myself.) Copleston himself (a Jesuit btw, but hardly a liberal) debated the existence of God with Bertrand Russell, on a BBC broadcast.

          Liked by 1 person

      • Thank you NEO for kindly looking out for me. 🙂 It is good of you.

        No worries, I do not see it as a personal attack. It was pretty mild next to some of the responses I have heard in the past.

        Dublin, eh? Yes. I remember my old Catholic spots from when I studied at Trinity College. The Church in Ireland certainly has its problems to this day. I suppose I would be curious to know why Robert left, as many times those who leave are fueled by problems that they see within the Church. I think a lot of people carry anger towards the Church, either knowingly or unknowingly, which is often quite justified in the sense of recognizing right from wrong in the actions of others. Unfortunately, it can blind them to the truth, and mar their sight, which is a great shame. I do not know if that is Robert’s situation, but I do hear the passion in his comments, and so I wonder.

        Well, back to the drawing board. I have work to do. God bless you both!

        Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Always, Isabella! i hoped you wouldn’t but…well, you know, more than most.

          I have to admit I rather like being semi-retired (yes retired, not retarded!)

          Liked by 1 person

        • LOL 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          🙂

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        • @Isabella: Well, none of us come from a religious vacuum, and I have had my ups and downs with Roman Catholicism, but I am always theologically and historically pressed! And my first degree was a BA from a Catholic college in Philosophy, of which I have always seen as God’s good providence! But I am now unashamedly Reformed and Reformational, and here of course I speak biblically, theologically, but always too, historically. Catholicism, of any flavor cannot stand beside this in my opinion! So this is really somewhat ideology, and here too I am a conservative (an Irish Brit living now in America). And I am retired, and semi-retired as an Anglican presbyter, (at 66).

          Liked by 1 person

        • I understand. I too am “reformational,” although not in a manner that I think most people would understand unless I carefully explained it. I think at this point God is temporarily pretty “reformational” too, or else He would not be allowing what He is in the world today. However, my belief is that His goal is to “reform” the Catholic Church by bringing it not only back to what it once was, but even better – making it into what it could have been for many centuries. To do that, I think He is out to reform hearts. I think we could all use a bit of that. I know I could. 🙂 As for Catholicism standing beside biblical, theological, and historical speak, I am sure that it can, although I am not the one to take up that cause in its fullness. I would rather speak more “poetically,” and when it comes to poetry, I don’t think anyone can beat the love of the Catholic saints (save Jesus Christ, Mary and Joseph). Well, I really do have to go now. If you reply I will get back to you later. God bless you!

          Liked by 1 person

        • Well just quickly, to my mind the Church is always “Christ Jesus” (The Jewish Messiah and the Incarnation Himself!) And the Visible Church is always both the elect and the non-elect (unregenerate), so we must leave it until the Judgment! And yes, I am a neo-Calvinist, unashamedly! 😉

          Yes, we who are Christ’s, are blessed, by grace and God’s Glory! 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • Yes, the Church is the “body” of Christ, which is all the angels and souls that are united to Christ through the spiritual bonds of love and grace. I am not sure if I explained that right as far as getting every last theological “t” crossed, so to speak, but that is how I understand it.

          The visible Church is quite the mish-mash. I suppose one could liken it to the healthy crops mingled with weeds that Christ referenced in the Bible. Somewhat like you said, we have to bear with it until God’s time, but I don’t think that means we should not try to always work towards its spiritual perfection, or spiritual “reformation” (within the right boundaries and with the right intentions). I suppose I am more on the Franciscan end in that regard, in that I prefer to try to work with what God gave us than leave it to found my own. (Although Heaven knows the human side of me would sure not mind! Who wouldn’t want things to be arranged according to their own dreams?)

          God knows what he is doing, and if the visible Church can get quite weedy at times, or even seem almost overrun with them, it is always for a reason. As my friend who is a nun put it, “in community life we are so close to one another, that we tend to rub up against each other at times, so to speak. But that is what polishes us.”

          If we leave the Church based on the faults (weeds) of others, we also leave the harvest that is coming. Anyways, I have rambled a bit, but just some thoughts that came to my mind. It is always nice to have a chance to refresh them, and go over them again. God bless you! 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • The Reformational doctrine of the visible church is certainly no doctrine of mere Church separation, though surely to separate from evil is always part of the Visible and Historical Church Catholic! Paul sets this down in 1 Corinthians chapters 5 & 6, etc. But the Church and so-called Body of Christ is always first spiritual, and only then visible, 1 Cor. 1: 2 ; verse 10, etc. noting verse 13, “Is Christ divided?” …etc. The Visible Church of Christ is part and parcel of the whole Church Catholic, but this Church is also hardly without human error and sin, we must battle this down to the end, and just before the Lord Comes, the true Church will be but a remnant! (Luke 18: 7-8) And the Lord’s Parable of the Pharisee and the publican is an example of this, verses 9-14, see too verses 15 thru 17. See also the Seven Churches in Rev. 2 & 3!

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        • Yes, I agree that it is first spiritual, and then visible. The spirit is much more important, although the visible has its role as well. I too have heard the situation with the Church being a remnant – many say that is occurring now. Well, you clearly know your scripture verses! God bless you and thanks for the interesting exchange.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Yes, to reclaim the sacred, we must reclaim ourselves, which is always a redemptive work! James hits the mark here…”So speak and so do as those who will be judged by the law of liberty. For judgment is without mercy to the one who has shown no mercy. Mercy triumphs over judgment.” (James 2: 12-13, NJKV)

          But real mercy demands all of us, our whole heart and being! Thanks to share! 🙂

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        • Very well said! You give a lot to think about there, by saying it in your own way. It is so important for our whole heart and being to be in such a redemptive work, but so often the Church makes it sound as if it were a simple thing. A matter of “believe this” or “do that.” I think people from every “denomination” can be found who do not fully understand how much is required of them, and even amongst those who get it, even they can always be much improved. It all comes down to zeal – how to get it, how to keep it…ah, so much to think about, now you got me thinking! 🙂 God bless!

          Liked by 1 person

        • Indeed no cheap grace in true redemption, but the so-called “work” is the Lord’s! But WE are found there central! God is the giver and maker of regeneration (life) … “Except a man/person be born again (from above, by God), he cannot see (understand) the kingdom of God.” (John 3: 3)

          Liked by 2 people

        • Yes, the work is the Lord’s. I think that is so easy to forget sometimes, but it is His. God bless!

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  4. the unit says:

    Yeah. interesting reading here. All have a choir to be preaching to.
    Here’s the way I see today. Communists, leftists, progressives…and democrats recognized “if you can’t beat’em, join’em.”
    The old way of religion to control the masses being lost gradually, but they noticed what worked. Before I was threatened with “Hell” so now threatened with “Global Suicide.” Profess one’s faith in government. Just have to believe. I say /sar, but they trying it. And pay your tithe in to Climate Change prevention and skimmers and scammers. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

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