Hullo, Mummy. Welcome to the Revolution!

World US

How Americans see Europe

Over here, we’ve long viewed the United Kindom as the mother country. After all, we based our freedom on English practice, as we did our law, our trade practices, and even our treatment of each other. In fact, that was so strong that our founders referred to the Revolution, not the rebellion. That is because we were completing the revolution, restoring our rights as Englishmen, not rebelling against lawful authority. That is most of the reason that after the unpleasantness in 1812-1815, it became pretty easy for us to resume our friendship.

And you know, the revolution is completing yet again, as the United Kingdom itself finds itself in exactly the same position as we did 240 years ago, being ruled by another power, without representation, in their case, Brussels and the European Union. Mark Twain said history rhymes, but this is almost as close as history ever comes to repeating.

Robert Tracinski over at The Federalist has also noticed this phenomenon:

[Recently at Colonial Williamsburg] Oh yes, and we also got together in a mob outside Raleigh Tavern and hanged Lord North in effigy. […] Most of you, I suspect, will not know who Lord North was or why we were (symbolically) hanging him. But it’s entirely relevant today.

w1056 (1)Lord North was His Majesty’s Prime Minister during the crucial years of the American Revolution, from 1770 to 1782. The specific infractions for which he was subjected to mock trial and hanging in effigy were the Intolerable Acts, a series of punitive measures against Boston that were widely interpreted as a declaration of war against colonial America.

Today, we tend to think of the American Revolution as a war against King George III. But it was just as much a war against the British Parliament and its leadership, which was increasingly regarded by Americans as a “foreign” body that did not represent them. We already had our own, long-established legislatures (Virginia’s General Assembly, for example, will soon celebrate its 400th anniversary and is one of the oldest in the world), and we considered them to be our proper representatives, solely authorized to approve legislation on our behalf.

[and] The key issue — the breaking point — is the European Union’s practice of seeking to validate its authority through popular referendums then ignoring them when they don’t get the result they wanted.

The EU crossed a fatal line when it smuggled through the Treaty of Lisbon, by executive cabal, after the text had already been rejected by French and Dutch voters in its earlier guise. It is one thing to advance the Project by stealth and the Monnet method, it is another to call a plebiscite and then to override the outcome.

[…] And when you think of it, we were just following the British example. Britain had faced its own conflicts between the authority of Parliament and the overreaching ambitions of its kings, and they had already set the example of removing the king to preserve the power of Parliament. Before we did it in the 18th century, they did it in the 17th century — twice. Britain itself had established the precedents of the rule of law and the consent of the governed. I don’t know why they would want to throw that away now.

via Brexit: Welcome, Britain, To Our Revolution

You know he is exactly right. We took those (God-given) rights that the English had taken back for themselves, and enforced that they could not be removed from the people, as the English had done over the centuries. That is really how the Amerexit from the first empire came about. Now it’s up to the British to take back Britain for themselves, with Brexit. If you think you need justification, how about John Locke, who said this:

The people alone can appoint the form of the commonwealth, which is by constituting the legislative, and appointing in whose hands that shall be. And when the people have said, We will submit to rules, and be governed by laws made by such men, and in such forms, no body else can say other men shall make laws for them; nor can the people be bound by any laws, but such as are enacted by those whom they have chosen, and authorized to make laws for them. The power of the legislative[,] being derived from the people by a positive voluntary grant and institution, can be no other than what that positive grant conveyed, which being only to make laws, and not to make legislators, the legislative can have no power to transfer their authority of making laws, and place it in other hands.

He was hardly alone, he was supported in Parliament (the only time it happened) by both William Pitt the Elder, and Charles James Fox, who took to wearing the blue and buff of the Continental Army in Parliament itself.

John Adams chimed in with this:

The fundamental article of my political creed is that despotism, or unlimited sovereignty, or absolute power, is the same in a majority of a popular assembly, an aristocratical council, an oligarchical junto, and a single emperor. Equally arbitrary, cruel, bloody, and in every respect diabolical.

Yes, we’ve talked about this before, that article is here.

One of the things that America has preserved is the written history of liberty, it is probably harder with the government in Parliament, and that problem is why our founders organized these United States as they did. We’re an originalist bunch, basing ourselves on rights hard won by Englishmen and Americans alike.

UKIP has a very cute video out as well.

Come on out, the sun is shining and there’s corn, and most of all, there’s freedom.

Something I rarely do, but I think you should also read this:

 http://www.libertylawsite.org/2016/06/21/this-realm-this-england/

 

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About NEO
Lineman, Electrician, Industrial Control technician, Staking Engineer, Inspector, Quality Assurance Manager, Chief Operations Officer

31 Responses to Hullo, Mummy. Welcome to the Revolution!

  1. the unit says:

    A comment after a Reuter’s article (on Yahoo news) about a Survation poll. Comment by a Brexit supporter…
    “Globalism is like spending all of your time with your in-laws.” lol

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      LOL, indeed it is! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • the unit says:

        I do love mine (mostly), a mother-in-law, brother-in-law, and two sister-in-laws. Mine now for 35 years. But spend little time around them. Still my tongue is scared from biting it for the little time biting it. 🙂
        They are libs, but not to the point of wishing or working for our demise. Nearest one 430 miles away, most distant Hawaii.

        Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Mine were basically OK, in fact I like my FIL quite a lot. His kids were, like all kids, a mixed bag. Haven’t seen any of them in about ten years, pretty much indifferent at this point.

          Liked by 1 person

        • the unit says:

          Same here. Last trip to nearest point where all were gathered was 2006.

          Liked by 1 person

  2. the unit says:

    I went through several pages of the comments on the above mention article. I don’t remember one being pro remain. Some were not encouraging that Brexit would win.
    Here are two that seem in line for this thread.
    David 6 hours ago
    Good heavens! It has taken a few days shy of 240 years, but Britain is FINALLY following her American lead and declaring her independence from a tyrannical form of government. Who would have thought? It is a move, long overdue. Welcome to a world of freedom and national self determination, mother country.
    Kevin 4 hours ago
    The Brits are angry that officials in Brussels, who they do not choose in an election, are deciding their fate. And therefore they want to break away. Funny, around 240 years ago, the American colonists were angry that officials in Britain, who they did not elect were deciding their fate. The colonists decided to revolt. Funny, the echos of history.

    I make no prediction, will be watching for result.

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      Yep, I’ve been hearing the same thing, even on some British sites. Finally, they are understanding what we meant all these years. 🙂

      About 50-50 right now, no predictions from me.

      Liked by 1 person

      • the unit says:

        Rush said today the result will affect the world. Then back tracked some and said I don’t know about the world, but the U.S. I don’t remember if he said how he thought. I’ll check his transcripts and see if he gave what he thought.

        Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          It will, but it’s hard to say exactly how.

          Liked by 1 person

        • the unit says:

          Yep he has lengthy monologue instigated by one caller on Brexit. In the end it boils down to the preservation or perishing of the powers and wealth of the elite there and here.

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Good bit of truth in that, I think. Consensus amongst the people I’ve talked to is that Cameron (the PM) is done either way. Whoops!

          Liked by 1 person

        • the unit says:

          I don’t think it would be hard to make a list of others who need to be done for.
          We will see what the vote brings.

          Liked by 1 person

  3. the unit says:

    Parliament lacks the authority to propose legislation.
    https://www.yahoo.com/news/europes-robots-become-electronic-persons-under-draft-plan-170708335–sector.html?ref=gs

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I will walk the plank, and say that over 60% will vote to stay?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Of course generally speaking they should leave, but it ain’t going to happen with this generation! Again, my opinion anyway. But, I hope I could be wrong?

      Like

    • NEO says:

      Hope you’re wrong. Looks about even to me, and leave is far more motivated. London, and Scotland will vote stay, but not by as much as many think. Millennials, even in London, and practically all farmers, and a healthy majority outside London are solidly pro leave. Gonna be interesting, but I think there’s a chance. Fear and false grief only go so far, I think. Freedom still counts, even in the UK.

      Like

      • I have two son’s there, both conservative minded, and they tell me the status quo to stay will prevail, but I hope YOU might be right? As I have said, most Brit’s these days are NOT ideological. True change is always hard, as we can see in America they want change, but who is going to lead them?

        Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          A lot of variables, and I’m mostly whistling in the dark, but Cameron has panicked. I have a friend pretty well up in the SCP, and they’ve pulled everybody, including the SMPs down into Northern England to canvass, and even in cities like Newcastle their finding it tough going. That’s what it comes down to short term economics (and Brexit won’t be as bad as Westminster says) vs. long term economics and actual democracy. Gonna be fascinating, I think. Lot’s of the Brexiteers are very motivated, while most of the Remaindeers seem to be going through the motions. And for once, the party line means nothing.

          Like

        • And btw, David Cameron is supposed to be a conservative Brit? So this does NOT break on just ideology (noting too dear Jessica). But we shall see eh?

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Well, he’s a Tory, anyway, but he strikes me as about as conservative as Tony Blair. He’s not even a decent Whig, as far as I can see. We will indeed, and to be honest, Jess and I just plain disagree on this, she believes the econ forecasts, but I’ve seen them to be wrong to often (almost always, in fact), so other things matter more

          Like

        • If the majority of the Brits break from the EU? I will drink a big toast, and sing Alleluia! (And I don’t drink these days 😉 )

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          You and me both, the whisky will come out! 😉

          Like

        • Well everyone knows I am a Christian Zionist type, and stand with ‘The Watchman’ (Isa. 62: 6…not being silent!), we are seeing things in the West we have NEVER seen! The question remains, just how long before the lid blows off, and ‘The Day Of The Lord’ arrives? My belief anyway!

          Liked by 1 person

        • Btw Scots whisky ain’t too bad either! The debate rages, Irish or Scottish whisky? 😉 Btw too, remember the Scottish Gaelic, the language of the Scottish Highlands! Me greatgram (born in Scotland, raised in Ireland) used to say we were Scots-Irish.

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          That’s why I used the British spelling – it’ll likely be Glenlivet, Irish ain’t too bad, though. Scots-Irish is the term used here in American for the great migration of Ulster-Irish that formed so much of America, especially the south and midwest.

          Like

        • Indeed I have people here (Americans of course) that want to try to drag me into all kinds of American Irish and Scottish arguments! Of course I plead me roots, but I am always an RMC! 😉

          Liked by 1 person

  5. the unit says:

    From a Yahoo article…
    “The official result is due some time after 0600 GMT on Friday but partial results and turnout figures from 382 counting centers will be announced from about 0100 GMT.”

    Does the above mean we might start seeing results about 8pm CDT Wednesday night from the partial results?
    And your being more familiar with UK, is there a website we might check as reporting on the partial results?

    Liked by 1 person

    • the unit says:

      I mean Thursday night.

      Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      Britain is six hours ahead of us (CDT) so here that would be about midnight on the full result. The other would be about 7 pm. So yes, 8 for you. These guys are usually alright: http://www.politics.co.uk/comment-analysis/2016/06/22/brexit-referendum-live

      And of course the BBC http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-eu-referendum-36594834.

      It’ll probably get some coverage here as well, I would think.

      Liked by 1 person

      • the unit says:

        Thanks. Sleeping has become more difficult for me lately, so I’ll likely start tuning in on those sites for the partial results. Should be conked out after midnight though, so maybe get the final Friday morning.

        Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          That’s my intention as well, unless I can’t sleep!

          Liked by 1 person

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