Ideology > Engineeering and Logic

A couple of reports mixed here, because they go to the same point. First, South Australia had a power outage last week. Ordinarily, that’s not news, but in this case, I gather nearly the whole state was off. Why? Here’s Andrew Bolt to tell you.

South Australia ran to Canberra for subsidies to protect Arium Steel – which has now been shut down in part because of the state’s ruinously juvenile obsession with green power. Terry McCrann and Nick Cater expose how green power is killing South Australia.

Terry McCrann:

Clements Gap wind plant in South Australia

Clements Gap wind plant in South Australia

ABSOLUTE unmitigated, undiluted bullcrap: the desperate, indeed seriously panicked claim that South Australia going ‘all North Korea black’ last week had nothing to do with its embrace of useless wind ‘power’ (sic).

Now for the facts. Yes, the proximate cause of SA’s power failure was transmission towers being blown down in last week’s storm.

We’ll put aside the rather important question of whether they were blown down because they weren’t built robustly enough, because the scattered nature of wind turbines requires so many of them that it would cost too much to ‘gold plate them.’

That said, despite the additional lies told by the global warming fanatics, the winds in SA last Wednesday were neither unprecedented nor particularly violent. They didn’t top 100kmh; they didn’t even reach the speeds of the lowest level of cyclone.

The key question, the question that utterly damns the SA reliance on wind turbines, is what happened next — when SA ‘lost’ its wind generation.

As AEMO — the Australian Energy Market Operator, — explained in a press statement last Thursday, the damaged transmission lines supported supply and generation north of Adelaide.

But “the reason why a cascading failure of the remainder of the South Australia network occurred is still to be identified and is subject to further investigation.”

Without stating so, AEMO then gave precisely the answer.

About 1900 megawatts (MW) was being consumed in South Australia at the time of the power failure, AEMO said; the SA generation — mostly, my words, wind from the north — was “being supported” by a total of 610MW from Victoria.

What AEMO didn’t say, but is blindingly obvious, when wind ‘generation’ dropped from around 900MW to zero literally in an instant, SA just as instantly ‘asked’ Victoria for that 900MW.

So suddenly the long extension cord from the coal-fired stations in the Latrobe Valley was being asked to increase its supply from around 500MW to around 1500MW.

In effect, the ‘wind-powered state’ wanted to ‘borrow’ almost the entire output of one of Victoria’s coal-fired stations. And it wanted to borrow it immediately, at 4.18pm last Wednesday. The cord just ‘shorted out.’ …

There are two damning, utterly undeniable points that prove it was ‘all about wind.’

If you are going to rely on the unreliable power ‘sources’ of wind or solar, when the wind don’t blow and/ or the sun don’t shine, you have to have back-up from a reliable power source, either gas or coal.

Further, you have to keep that back-up turning over, because when the wind don’t blow or the sun don’t shine, it can go from 1000MW to zip pretty quickly — even without dodgy towers falling over.

Which of course makes the whole exercise a farce. Why have wind at all to replace coal or gas if you still have to keep the coal/gas?

Unless, and this is the critical second point, you try to do it on the cheap — both the real cheap and the ‘environmental’ cheap: by using that long extension cord to ‘someone else’s dirty power.’ Except Wednesday showed us exactly what can happen when you do that.

Nick Cater:

It is barely two months since Weatherill demanded $100 million from Canberra to keep Arrium Steel working. Yet it was the blackout, a consequence of Labor’s renewables policy, that ­finally shut the Whyalla plant down. Enforced idleness is costing Arrium about $4m a day.

Green politics really is shutting down Whyalla, after all.

South Australia is also running to other states to supply it with the kind of power it deems too dirty to produce itself – yet needs to keep on the lights:

The state’s capacity to produce its own baseload power from fossil fuels has rapidly diminished. The state’s four largest power stations — two at Port Augusta, Pelican Point and Torrens Island A — will have closed or will be in mothballs by this time next year, made unviable by unpredictable deluges of cheap wind power.

The combined lost capacity of 1250MW represents a third of the state’s generating potential. What has filled the gap? You’ve guessed it: imported power from Victoria, generated mostly by the same brown coal deemed unacceptable in oh-so-clean South Australia.

Upgrading the national grid to give South Australians the comfort of a reliable energy supply will be expensive. The costs inevitably will push up power prices, passed on as another hidden cost of Labor’s carbon fetish.

via Renewable Power Australia – Green Power Works When There’s A Daddy To Pay | PA Pundits – International

And that’s the thing if the sun don’t shine, or the wind don’t blow (or blows too hard) your solar and wind power don’t work. And no, nobody has an efficient means to store power. A lot of taxpayer’s money has been squandered on it though, with very limited results. And what South Australia has done is exactly what California is doing, for the same political reason. Eventually, it will have similar results.

And it diffuses the grid, which has other problems, such as security. I have wondered for years when I would write this story, because, to me, it’s the obvious way to disrupt life in the west, disrupt the power grid. From Weaponsman.

In 2014, we asked, “What can a mere rifle do?” in reference to a standoff attack on a Pacific Gas and Electric power substation in Metcalf, California.

The answer, in that case, was to blow the transformers to hell and gone, and bug out. To date, there has been no arrest in the case; at one time, a DHS official suggested it was an inside job. There have been subsequent attacks, despite attempts to upgrade security; indeed, once, criminals cut through a fence and made off with equipment that was on site — for security upgrades.

Now, there’s been a new rifle attack on a station, in rural Utah. It appears to have been less sophisticated and less persistent than the California attack, but more effective — the attacker or attackers blew the station off the grid with as few as three rifle shots.

On Sunday, somebody went to the remote substation located between Kanab and Page, Arizona, and fired at least three rounds with a high-powered rifle into the main transformer, knocking out power to an estimated 13,000 customers in Kanab, Big Water, Orderville, Glendale, Hatch and surrounding towns in Garfield County.

“Just from the looks of it, it looked more criminal than vandalism because they knew exactly where to shoot it and they shot it multiple times in the same spot,” Brown said. “For somebody to know exactly where that substation is and how to hit it exactly like he did, (it) seems like he’d have to have knowledge of that.”

Countermeasures that can be used in cases like this are limited. In California, the power company deployed cameras, but they’re investigative, not preventive, technology; and constructed blinds that block sight of the most vulnerable transformers, but they’re concealment, not cover. In Utah, the power company has asked for tips, and done something even less practical than the Californians:

Now you go and combine those stories, well if the bad guys do, we’re likely to go back a (or a few) hundred years. Substations are really hard to secure, and a rifle is the bottom level threat. There are others, and they would be more catastrophic.

Not sure there is really an answer, there’s not in this article, but it’s something we should be thinking about – at all levels.

And then there is the EMP threat attack, by the NORKs and others.

About Neo
Lineman, Electrician, Industrial Control technician, Staking Engineer, Inspector, Quality Assurance Manager, Chief Operations Officer

170 Responses to Ideology > Engineeering and Logic

  1. the unit says:

    Project requiring possible engineering and logic concerning residential power line
    Need: Trim over head and over reaching tree limbs around incoming power line to home
    Preliminary need to clean out pickup truck bed so that step ladder can be set up in it. Bed filled with junk and years of leaves actually composted, … with earth worms. Done. Now needs washing out. Problem though is water in bed runs toward the front. Engineering ideas. Lift and shim the front of the bed so it tilts to the rear. Naw! Jack up the front higher than the back. Naw, jack only lifts one side of an axle to change flat.
    Engineering solution: Park the truck with the rear wheels in the driveway mudhole where the dirt is gone from tracking out when driving through over the years (choice as multiple mudholes in driveway). Front wheels up higher above the mudhole depression. A-la, water now runs out back of bed! Preliminaries done.
    Next step ladder secured and stable in bed, proper positioning of truck so limbs don’t fall on cutter-person (me). Pole saw at hand. Now job accomplished. Secondary attribute: internet and tv cable line cleared as well.
    Morning done, break time, check NEO’s site and see if I’m able to comment today. Only a break, still plenty of day light. Clean up next. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      Sounds like a good day, so far, Unit! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • the unit says:

        Yep, and all loaded on trailer for early trip to county landfill. Got called in for supper, barbecued ribs! Logic said go eat. Then have an hour left to tie down good…then time to lie down. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Yay! You! You accomplished more than I did today. Not that that was difficult! 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • the unit says:

          Even tho it’s not Saturday yet I’ll have to shower tonight ’cause my hair is full of wood chips from sawing overhead. Looked high and low for my old ball cap to wear for the job, but couldn’t find it. Just as well. Working up in tree I’d have to turn the bill backwards. That looks stupid. Guess a shower won’t hurt. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Mine always was – even with a brain bucket on. Showers rarely hurt, as long as you don’t fall down! 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

  2. the unit says:

    Sort of a continuation of situation above. Got some more pole saw business 300 feet away from 120 volt source. Would really like to put my Generac 5500 in truck bed for power. However it has floating neutral and manual says have frame properly earth grounded. Local Generac service guy says don’t worry because pole saw is plastic handle and switch. Internet discussion sites say don’t worry because you’re using on board receptacles. Also manual says all this proper grounding is code required and MAY help prevent electric shock.
    I’ve also read sometime ago that grounding rod needs to go down to the water table.
    Any thoughts?

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      Generac guy is mostly correct, if you use mostly double insulated tools. And in fact even if you don’t. Here’s the thing, if you’ve reasonable tires on the pick-up, it’s sort of a floating ground, itself.

      What I would do, and what I always did, was to bond the generator to the vehicle frame, so there is no possibility of making yourself a circuit between. Then I would use an in-line GFCI cord on everything.

      In fact, that is pretty much what OSHA mandates as well, for construction sites. In the POCOs when working hot lines, we either drive temporary ground rods, or bond our trucks to the lines neutral, but that’s a step way to far for you, and there we have specific problems to solve.

      In any case, the GFCI cord is a proven lifesaver, even on older central stations systems. Easily worth the money.

      Liked by 1 person

      • the unit says:

        Great. I can do that bonding gen frame to truck frame and get GFCI cord. I looked the cord up and they are short. I’ll need to use say a 50 ft. extension cord from it to saw. That ok?

        Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Sure, as long as your cord is good. That’s what I always did on a service truck with a welder, as well. There are some commercial GFCI cords that are 50-100 ft. long, but don’t know how available they are, mostly I see them in construction supply catalogs. Remember this as well, A GFCI makes an old two wire outlet nearly as safe as a current one. It’s one of the few ways to replace a two wire outlet without rewiring, legally.

          Liked by 1 person

        • the unit says:

          OK. And thanks.

          Like

  3. the unit says:

    Finally got the generator in the truck. Finished today. All grounded to truck frame and in line GFCI. Not knowing much about electricity, in event of a short will the ground wire and truck be hot for anyone touching it?

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      No, well not for more that five cycles or so, depending on how fast the breaker trips, and the short would have to be ahead of the GFCI. Should be as safe as anything can be. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • the unit says:

        Some things I just can’t understand. Still amazed that when traveling by car if a fly is perched on the headrest of my seat or the passenger seat, when it take off flying why doesn’t it slam into the rear window? I mean if I’m jumping on a trampoline and someone moves it while I’m in the air, I hit the ground probably on my butt with my luck. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  4. the unit says:

    All working great. Trimmed limbs down long drive, far away from electrical outlet. Just one more thing to do. Over-ride the safety button keeping the trigger of pole saw from pressing in. My Dupuytren’s thumb needs a splint this morning. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  5. the unit says:

    Well, all you advised me on has worked out great. Gen hook-up in truck, GFCI breaker, good extension cord and all. However the trees and limbs fought back like a Founding Patriot! On one cut the limb twisted while sliding down another and pinched the bar. Had to let go of the saw and go pull on the branches. Then the saw fell and busted one side of the cowling holding the saw on the pole. Fixed that by replacing it with a metal electrical outlet cover with no receptacle cut outs. Drilled a hole in the middle for the mounting bolt to go through. Next job limbs had wirey vines and they would ride the chain back to the sprocket and get under the chain/bar. Had to stop and reload the chain on the bar. Finally through that too. All necessary limbs down now. Will just have occasional maintenance work there.
    New job. Most of what I’ve trimmed and cut was around drive and house and hauled to the dump. About 20 trailer loads I think. Starting on the back overgrown couple of acres. Decided to do burning instead of hauling before my part of FL begins “no burn” days. Had many dried water oak I’ve cut previously. First two piles burned fast, no problem. But then…latest pile of something else just won’t burn. Tried on 4/12 with no luck. Used charcoal lighter, no luck. Let sit with tarp cover to keep even the morning dew off ’til today, 4/17. Charcoal lighter again, still no burn. Even with the no no of using gasoline…no burn. This “something else” is I don’t know what. It’s been cut for weeks too. None of my neighbors have the stuff. Think it was some foreign something that was mixed in horse feed that the horses spread around in excrement. Grows looking like a peacock tail but not the colors. Used Blazer 4wd to pull up by roots. All I can figure is this stuff is from the plant kingdom and has received salvation. Will not burn. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      Darned if I know, haven’t hit anything I couldn’t get to burn eventually. Gasolines not very effective, it burns too fast, I’ve had better luck with diesel, but it tends to smoke. I hear that, we had ‘red flag’ days here in February. Had one out hear that we used half a service tank of gas on, finally had chip the garbage, ugly stuff. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  6. the unit says:

    This isn’t energy so much, but still engineering and logic. Pool present turning into nightmare. Filling got to a point of no water rise, and starting to drop faster than hose and city water can supply. Noticed Friday night. No service people available on weekends, and it’s paid for already you know. Water level down and liner starting to sag.
    Tomorrow will be interesting day! I’m sure what I’ll say to service guy will seem smart alecky to the least. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  7. the unit says:

    Maybe I can post this comment in the logic section of this particular blog site. There is no other blog I enjoy as much as Nebraska Energy Observer. When blogs and reader/commentators disappear I always wonder…what happened to them? I’m going to be away for some time and I don’t want you to think I wasn’t interested in this blog any longer.
    I don’t know what else to call it, but a calamity has happened in the life of a dearly loved one. The emotional and economic collateral damage has carried over to other family members, of course including myself.
    I’ll be reading some, but soon I’ll be physically away from home and internet activity tending to the situation. I won’t be commenting though because my heart and mind will be distracted from consideration of other problems and even the pleasant insights you often write about.
    I am ok and hopefully will gather myself together and be back fully before it’s all over.
    The it’s…, whatever. I’ll never ask “What difference, at this point, does it make?” 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  8. the unit says:

    Months ago you suggested for my generator safety to have reasonably good tires and a good extension cord. Will this one do? 🙂
    http://www.fakeposters.com/posters/electricians/

    Liked by 1 person

  9. the unit says:

    Think this fits well in Engineering and Logic.
    Ran across interesting ad pop-up @ Drudge for Pilatus planes. Never heard of them before so looked up.
    Max. takeoff weight: 4,740 kg (10,450 lb)
    Maximum landing weight: 4,500 kg (9,921 lb)
    Sounds like a good airship to take two or three progressives up at take off and you know what before landing. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  10. the unit says:

    How’s this for logic? Had strange thought, question, while resting overnight. Remember a few blog articles back how excited I was to go OT to tell of new vet benefit to be able to shop online at service exchanges? Why now, just short of 50 years after my discharge from active duty? Maybe here’s why. April 16, 2009: “Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano said Wednesday that she was briefed before the release of a controversial intelligence assessment and that she stands by the report, which lists returning veterans among terrorist risks to the U.S.” There’s 18 million of us. Ship goods and products to their address, you know where they are.
    Paranoid much, huh? 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  11. the unit says:

    Short and sweet as much as I can.
    Leviton wall receptacle hot terminal melted.
    Wires from wall so short, I had to go with another plug-in.
    Trip to store for new one.
    Got home, 12 ga. wires wouldn’t plug in.
    Second trip to store.
    Salesman said it was because screws were screwed in. ?
    Got home with same one, still wouldn’t plug in with screws screwed out.
    Third trip to store.
    Different salesman sold me a 20/125 different from regular plug-in. Insert straight wire in slot right at screw and then screw down tight.
    Got home, worked fine. Should be happy as I wanted to use the screws in the first place instead of the plug-in.
    Of course you know why the first one wouldn’t work. First salesman didn’t. 🙂
    P.S. Maybe they don’t make 15/125 to accept 12 ga. anymore. Electrical Safety? Maybe I should change out all old ones throughout house?

    Above…that’s what I wrote earlier to be concise, but since you said looking forward to it. More detail to do it justice. We want justice. 🙂
    I pretty much thought the person didn’t know what he was talking about. With the old one the screws had nothing to do with the plug-in. But said to myself maybe things have changed. Then though with the screws turned out he took a wire with insulation on it and stuck in one hole, “see it goes in.” I took hold and pulled it out, stuck in about 1/16 in. He said he “didn’t want to stick in too far.”
    By the third trip (next day) I had magnified the tiniest tiny raised letter printing that was the same color as the receptacle and it said 12 ga. at screws, 14 ga. for plug-in. The second salesman who I knew knows stuff and wasn’t there the day before helped me this time. We checked and they all (Eaton and Leviton) said 14 ga. plug-in).
    As for the wires being too short, I was afraid to try to straighten too much as been bent up in wall box since ’72. Afraid to straighten, curve terminal end and stuff back in box, afraid that might work harden and possibly break.
    As for plug-in, I’ve always thought connection not as secure as screw tighten well. However these in house been there since ’72 (we here since ’83).
    As for the melted hot terminal, the only constant load on it was battery box for when power goes off, with modem, wifi, and printer plugged into it. House has copper wire, maybe old Leviton internal metal corroded bad?
    As for the hardware, first traded there in ’68 long before it became an ACE, now a DO IT BEST. Always was good, but now more like a gift shop with all sorts of trinkets and stuff, as well as all the hardware and lumber. Even outdoor clothing lines. My really old timer salespersons, Ben retired 20 years ago and dead…Bob retired 10 years ago and last I heard serious heart problems, maybe deceased as well. Can’t ask about him as no one there was there then to remember either. 🙂
    Well, back to the brakes. Get air out of MC and then gravity bleed lines.Will read today’s blog later. ’til later. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      Yep, a code change in 1999 or maybe 2002 cycle. The proper feed for a 15 A outlet is #14 wire and that is all that will go in the quick wire holes (I won’t use them-I consider them hazardous) you can and should loop the wire around the screws, or use 15/20 amp outlets, which are more expensive. That said, there are outlets (Leviton, I think) I use Eagle mostly, where the screw runs the back wire holes as well, They are OK and faster than looping. In your spot, I would have spliced a bit of wire on to the wire in the wall to give me some clearance, (Code requires six inches from the entrance to the box and about four from the wall.)but I have lots of scrap. 🙂

      Leviton stuff is OK, but like anything else, if bought by price (like when you’re bidding a job), well there are better available, but the price goes up. I bid using commercial or better in kitchen and bath, but most outlets have a table lamp, if that. Sounds to me like the quick wire got you on this one. That, of course, is why the box is required.

      Hardware store are a difficult retail thing, my local one (where I worked a few years) started out as Coast to Coast and after a few changes is an Our Own. It’s still downtown or would also have morphed to a farm store – the stuff is available. But we had stock at least ten years old still in inventory, we pretty much always had what you needed, but it’s an expensive business model, 50X100 foot store, inventory value about 1/4 million. And it’s hard to have relevant expertise in all the stuff you sell, the owner was pretty good in plumbing, and I handled electrical questions, the rest were basically clerks, who did at least know where things were.

      Good luck with the brakes! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • the unit says:

        Both were Eaton. First one 99 cents. Next $3 something. So don’t have loop, but under very tight screw. Screwing is like riding a bike, don’t forget. Thanks for the info. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • the unit says:

        Oh, and both stamped Made in America. Surprised! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          The lines have been in place since the 60s when we went to grounded outlets (that wasn’t that big a transition either), and we are practically the only ones using our configuration, maybe Canada, Mexico, and parts of the Philippines as far as I remember.

          I don’t remember ever looking, for me it’s a commodity item. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

  12. the unit says:

    This morning took the knob off that dastardly stovetop burner. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  13. the unit says:

    Two days now trying out Walabot, to be fair in evaluation. Must be toy for libs. Have to be someone who wants the results to be drilling holes in all the wrong places! Process failure!
    Being conservative, reactionary really, I didn’t do that. Fortunately, was able to measure where studs are (old way with magnet) in dry wall on other side of tile bathroom and transpose to tile wall on other side to install grab bar in shower.
    To make story short, that I wished was gonna be a success story. Walabot=Pieceacrap. 🙂
    And no, I’m not gonna demand my money back. Live and learn. Education is expensive “process”. Still reaping the results. And result is grab bar in the “right” place. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  14. the unit says:

    I think you have Windows 10? Scanned a paper picture on a copy machine into my laptop. It’s there, hooray. But I can’t figure how to transfer to a blog post. It’s on desktop, but can’t see how to attach it or show it. Any suggestions as to what to click on. I can’t even do “as stupid does.” 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      Depends on what kind of file, the easiest is to make it a jpeg, then you can treat it as a picture. PDFs are possible, but not sure I know how, either. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • the unit says:

        See if this shows from what I did with UBS cord tranfer from copy mac. to laptop. Should be a old cartoon. 🙂
        file:///C:/Users/Thom/Desktop/Foster.jpg

        Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Likely does but I can’t read it from your drive, if that makes sense. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • the unit says:

          I think I ate a box of life’s chocolates from the cat litter box this morning. 🙂
          Pulling limited hairs out now. Got pic, with file name, on computer. How post it. Tried dragging, pulling, kicking…getting close to “Burn, Baby, Burn.” 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          I haven’t really figured out how to do that either – I either put on Google drive or WordPress, neither is really satisfactory. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • the unit says:

          I’ll keep trying. You’d think a guy who served with Hoffman and Brown, and remembers when Vernor went AWOL could figure this out. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

  15. the unit says:

    I give up, hours later. No wonder we declared independence. Found UK babe to explain how to do it. I give up, forget copy, paste, add media. That “add media” must be why it’s all screwed up. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  16. the unit says:

    I think I found a site that can give url to my old cartoons of 20 years ago, so I could post on a blog.
    Just as I was about to load one I’d transported from copy machine to laptop, I decided better read “community rules.” Uh-oh. Considering today’s definition of “hate” and who my cartoons were about, and all the sueing being mentioned in most all news . Not racist though, well…unless Slick Willie is who he said he was. 🙂
    Site was imgur.com. and will report what they determine as hate to Slick Willie Foundation.
    So on second thought, didn’t click it.
    Now, I had a cartoon website with all back then. Had hits from military base ipo’s from all over U.S. and world. They say what’s posted is forever posted. So let them find it if they wish. 🙂
    And just now thinking, if so maybe google image finder could find them. Might try that. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  17. the unit says:

    Well, this afternoon I was looking for a V-belt to replace one driving my grinding wheel. Inherited from my uncle 50 years ago. Belt that is on it (since I’ve had it) not broken but slipping, so thought I’d get a new one. # on it still readable 15546 – Made in USA.
    No luck googling to find it, but got a hit to this. Had to laugh. Should snowflake with degree in gender studies apply?
    Position Available:
    JO 15546 Maintenance Technician
    Location:
    TN
    Salary Range: Negotiable/Experience Based
    Summary: The Company is a fast- growing, meat processing facility, and is currently seeking a highly motivated person to fill our Procurement/Inventory Clerk position in our maintenance department. This position is responsible for inventory parts control. This person tracks back orders, creates purchase orders, places drop-ship orders, provides confirmation and tracking information. This individual works with the Director of Purchasing and Maintenance Management. We are growing and expanding our business, so we need to have a top-flight team to help us accomplish our goals!
    Essential Functions:

    · Repair and maintain machinery and mechanical equipment, such as motors, pumps,
    conveyors, belts, fans, air conditioners, etc.
    · Examine mechanical equipment to diagnose trouble.
    · Disassemble machines, repair or replace broken parts.
    · Adjust functional parts of mechanical devices as necessary.
    · Clean and lubricate parts
    · Order replacement parts
    · Inspect completed repairs
    · Performs all work in accordance with established safety procedures
    · Requisitions new parts and equipment
    · This employee is required to lift up to 75 pounds.
    · Preventative Maintenance experience is necessary.
    Required Qualifications/Skills:
    · Ability to apply some advanced skills to the position or specialization.
    · May adapt procedures, processes, tools, equipment and techniques to meet the more
    complex requirements of the position.
    · Resolves most questions and problems, and refers only the most complex issues to higher
    levels.
    · Works under minimal supervision
    · May assist in orienting and training lower level employees.
    · Must be able to work in a noisy, wet and cold environment of approximately 36 degrees
    Fahrenheit and below.
    · Must be able to stand or walk, on concrete/cement, for duration of shift. Minimum of eight
    (8) hours.
    · Follow all GMP’s required in working in a Meat Processing Plant
    · Able to pass respirator fit test.
    Other DesiredQualifications/Skills:
    · Ability to use a multi-meter and other measurement instruments.
    · Ability to troubleshoot PLC controls, such as Allen-Bradley and Watlow Controllers
    · Fabricate and modify parts using shop equipment; utilizing sanitary welding equipment
    procedures.
    · Ability to work with computer programs, such as Word and Excel
    · Ability to demonstrate proficient fabrication and welding systems – MIG, TIG and Stick
    Welding.

    Contact: OMITTED for this comment.
    Still laughing…
    🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      It’s a fair description of maintenance in a packing plant, except that no one can meet it, considering that, the pay ain\t all that, the working conditions suck, and advancement in political. Been there, done that, got the brain bucket. 🙂 And BTW at the line level you’ll never see a computer, and USDA will mess up your whole day. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • the unit says:

        Yeah, I guess a new grad from our local Vo-Tech couldn’t handle all that, not right away needing lots of experience for it all.
        And I noticed the school had dropped Vo from it’s gate marquee name. Locklin Technical School now. Vo’s out of vogue these days. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Nobody can right out of the gate. Most of it is specialized machinery and most of the companies have reasonable training programs, if you have the aptitude. It’s a hard, pressure packed job, though. Self aggrandizement, mostly. It’s still co tech, and a good job. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • the unit says:

          Bet it wasn’t Pelosi or Maxine Waters (and their like) who came up with the necessary qualifications and requirements.

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Nope, they actually made sense, the qualifications I mean, although they are overbroad – they always are for hiring, you need specialists, bu they think they can’t afford them.

          Liked by 1 person

        • the unit says:

          BTW. Found v-belt. Not 15546, but 15545, washed number to see better. Still made, uncle had Plymouth and its called for a Belvedere ’65 6.3L. Grinder working much better for lawnmower blade sharping and ax. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Yep, 1/2 in wide at the top and 544 inches long. Standard “A” belt as my dad would have said. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

  18. the unit says:

    Some folks at line level need a good list of requirements for operation. 🙂
    https://imgur.com/a/KMiddol

    Liked by 1 person

  19. the unit says:

    Hurricane season isn’t offically over until Nov. 30, but so far been missed.
    There was news report that some old feller was electrocuted hooking up his generator in Florence. No more details.
    I remember your advice as to be sure extension cords are in good shape. Made sure my was after we lost power for a short while after Gordon. As you know gen in truck with ground to frame and good tires…and GFCI in line. Plywood sheet over gen, but still misting rain made me a bit worried. Hooked up and yanked rubber handle starting rope and all went well. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  20. the unit says:

    My lawnmower/generator repairman tells me my Generac 5500 after 20 years has gone kerpoot.
    Still runs, but too fast and voltage to much, says parts no longer available.
    Guess I have to buy a new one. I just need one after a storm to run a fridge and one light bulb at night. Places like Harbor Freight have small ones pretty cheap.
    What do you think would be the size watt one I could do the job with.?

    Liked by 1 person

    • the unit says:

      Well, just picked up the gen, actually he fixed what I took it in for. It was not cutting down speed when no appliance or tool demanding current. That working now.
      What he says is it’s putting out 149.5 volts and I should not plug in a fridge or home appliance.
      I’ve never check for that. How long been going on I don’t know. Plugged fridge in last October when power was off for four hours.
      Is that a new one? Now works too good!
      Do you think not good to use that way? Not wanting to damage appliances.
      Maybe use 200 ft of extension cord for resistance? Just kidding as I certainly don’t know much about such matters. Then again I was using 100 ft to my fridge back then. Could that have kept me from causing damage?

      Liked by 1 person

      • NEO says:

        Happens sometimes, sounds like the governor is NLA. Likely so, if it was a fairly small cord, like most. Normally you shouldn’t be putting out more than about ~126V. !50V, well, unless you got a variac laying around, you’re pretty much done. I tend to set them by frequency, but then I’m an industrial electrician and have tools for such things.

        Sometimes one can find an appropriate surplus engine, cause yours isn’t gonna last too long, probably, gotta be running a bit over 4000 rpm when it’s designed for about 3450.

        Or you can add enough load to bring the voltage down, longer cord and what not, not very efficient but it might work, but a pain to get right.

        Liked by 1 person

        • the unit says:

          My last variac was with my electric train set I got Christmas morning when I was about 8. Which didn’t work that morning. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          About the size of it. Might be able to find what we call a buck transformer to do the job. Trouble is you’ll have the price of a generator in it, and the higher frequency will increase the mass density in the motor, shortening its life. Hard to find free lunches these days. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • the unit says:

          Help, AOC!

          Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      Fridge and a light – 1200 watts would probably do you (depending on the fridge, 20% over its nameplate should be plenty), especially if you use a LED bulb. If I was looking in that range, I’d look at an inverter on your truck, no engine to maintain, and handy to have anyway. Key thing is to keep the fridge closed as much as possible, no point in letting the cold out.

      Liked by 1 person

  21. the unit says:

    One last dumb question about this.
    My cheap Radio Shack volt meter plugged in right at the generator outlet shows right at 150 volts.
    If I plug in 100 or 200 ft of extension cord/cords and check voltage at the end…should I see a drop in voltage on my meter?
    And oh, have gone ahead and ordered a 2000/1400 on special from Home Depot, free(yea AOC)home delivery. That’ll maybe keep the ice cubes tumbling if I lose power. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      Yep, and there is a formula (that I’d have to look up) but it will depend on the load, so plug in something when you are checking.

      That should do ya fine, unless you get carried away. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • the unit says:

        In the arms of an angel. 🙂

        Like

      • the unit says:

        Not a big name machine, Sportsman? Usual reviews, some good and some bad. Couple about significant oil usage.
        Plan to when it comes, pull plug and squirt in some oil and pull cord over and over before starting, and then follow break-in instructions…if it starts. 🙂
        Lot’s of work for on sale $169.99 plus tax.
        I’d pay it for an ice cube when I needed it. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          I hear you. We have one, and most of our vehicles have inverters, as well.

          Liked by 1 person

        • the unit says:

          Yeah, I got to check and learn more about those inverters.
          My thought about squirting oil in the cylinder is that these things probably dried out while being shipped from China.
          P.S. Done done with old Generac. Plugged in just a 75 W light blub and charging part started smoking. Everywhere I surf there are ads for ED cure. Guess would be good when I get old to be smoking. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Yep, once you let the smoke out, it’s done. 🙂

          They’re handy, but be prepared they can pull a fair mount out of a battery.

          Liked by 1 person

  22. the unit says:

    Here’s hoping I’ll need it as much as get sexual intercourse. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  23. the unit says:

    Weather.com forecast of Tropical Storm didn’t happen. Though lots of rain coming. Nephew and family in Houston. Didn’t flood in Harvey, so sure they will be fine.
    New question on generator. Fridge plate says it’s 11.6 amps. I guess that’s normal running. GE, which it is, website says starting surge is 2 X running watts. If so that means my running watts (amps x volts) is 1392 (gen is 1400), but surge would be 2784 watts (gen is max 2000). And twice a day defrost cycle requirement is something over running watts (not given).
    Website says surge start up is one to two seconds, so maybe it wouldn’t hurt gen to see if it will do the job (instruction books says exceeding max watts over extended period can damage gen, more worried about fridge).
    THINK IT WOULD HURT TO TRY AND SEE WHAT HAPPENS? No blame for your thoughts. 🙂
    Thinking right now best to use little Sportsman for a few lights, battery charging for 18 volt/120 volt Ryobi flash lights, and cell phone chargers. And getting a bigger gen that would do a 240 clothes dryer and pool pump (neither running full time, just during drying cycle and circulating chlorine). Considering as I have in the past gone weeks without electricity. 🙂
    Getting expensive, but so is my homeowners/storm insurance which I pay and I don’t want to use either. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      Not much harm in trying it a time or two. But it means you won’t be able to put anything else on it. We did the same thing, BTW, but we needed the compact footprint (the clearance price didn’t hurt, either). We’ve found a super soft start that we’re thinking about, mostly because it’s $350.00, which is kind of silly, but we’re short of room in our application.. It could theoretically damage either or both, but not in a test or two. Depends a lot on cost, but bigger would be better, if you don’t have to carry it around. Now my ass is tired from straddling the fence, but it’s that sort of question, no easy answers.

      Liked by 1 person

      • the unit says:

        There was a Cowboy site a few years ago captioned with a naked man straddling a barbed wire fence.
        Like I said no responsibility directed for your opinion.
        Think I’ll go DJT “yuge” ‘er solution here. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Heh! That would be my preference, you can always find something else to plug in. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • the unit says:

          Been raining all day. When dry up, gonna see if little Sportsman will start fridge. If will then the 1400 watts should keep it going. All I’ve read is confusing, brochure pamphlet/directions says surge comes in starting and stopping fridge fans. I thought it was about starting compressor?
          Like you say can always find something else to plug in. Accomplished and experienced fellow like me can always grab another appliance by the plug, in Trump terminology. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Yeah the fans would be, I think, load that would barely show up. But I’ve been wrong once or twice over the years. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • the unit says:

          Aw come on, you know the idiom about being mistaken but was mistaken. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

  24. the unit says:

    Finally, 3 pm, after three days of heavy rain.
    Sportsman 2000/1400 started fridge. 🙂
    Requiring 11.6 amps, I’ll have to do a STEM calculation to figure out when I want an ice cube instead of light bulb. 🙂

    Like

  25. the unit says:

    Having trouble with, I think it’s WordPress notification bell at blog site (yours and any other site using WordPress). My email inbox shows when you post new blog and also when some other commenter comments back at me. But on your site (and others using WordPress) when I click on the bell, the screen that drops down is blank with a spinning circle like it’s trying or searching to post.
    Any ideas? Can’t find any support from WordPress. I can’t see any settings on my end for any control. I did find a page indicating the blog creator uses a plugin to notify viewers of the blog to comment and know when another user responds to his comment. Like i.e. when Scoop responded to my comment, it used to notify me on the bell and the drop down screen showed his comment. And also when you, the blog creator did as well. And it was instant. Now only when checking my email can I know if you or another had a response.

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      Nope, no answer from me. Mine was the same way for about the last week, since Windows updated. Then the end of last week, it fixed itself. At a guess the Windows update security blew it up and it took WP a while to sort it out. Here, they have, hopefully they will yours too, soon. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  26. the unit says:

    I wonder if you missed my comment/question above this one?

    Liked by 1 person

  27. the unit says:

    Guess what? My first comment/question above was Oct.2016. Seems like longer than that I been doing this. 🙂
    Must’ve been some back and forth before over at Rat’s.
    Anyways, my dad’s bumper jack played out the other day. Used it for utility trailer and to jack out old fence posts.
    Saw some look a likes on ebay, but couldn’t buy one so simple at NAPA or Advance Auto Parts. Only could order a farm jack at either for $172. So got the one in stock at Harbor Fright for $59.99.
    Tried it out on the trailer. Jacked up fine. Then the let down, was fast. Busted a nuckle, blood and all.
    So read the directions, says what to do to prevent that. Going to go and read that again. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  28. the unit says:

    About my new Carrier and what I’m doing about it. That old Heil that lasted 26 years. Compresser only… had to have new indoor heat and evaporator core (core plugged with filth up in ’07). I’d changed the filter each month. So did that with the new core in ’07 too. But when looked at the ’07 core when got the new system last week, dirty as the D.C. swamp.
    So I’ve caulked around all return vents and base boards.
    Will let you know how the next core looks in 15 or 20 years. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  29. the unit says:

    Wife says Sophia wonders how flicking a wall switch makes the ceiling light or fan come on. She figures it because grand points to switch and then light or fan. Wife searched how things work to explain to no avail for a 1 1/2 year old. So she’s going to start with showing her wires. Imo this is just something one learns from experience…common sense…if one has it. Give her credit though for wanting to start early thinking and problem solving. Guess then I’ll have to tear into the sheet rock to trace the wiring switch to light…then to the pole…then to the generating plant…then to the coal barge…then to the coal mine. Then explain ignition…and how a match is made.
    P.S. The company that makes the stove knob cover says kid will eventually defeat the purpose of the safety device…so be ever vigilant they say. Back to common sense. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  30. the unit says:

    Is Engineering and Logic link deleted from NEO site?
    I’m one that seems to have utilized it. And paid attention, short of buying dielectric boots. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  31. the unit says:

    Er…will seem strange from FL, but you mentioned tight fitting boots, somewhere above.
    Inherited lots of loose knitted socks (not necessarily thermal) that was bro in law’s.
    Anyway my feet always cold, even here.
    Should I wear my loosees fitting boots with them for best warmingist? Being serious. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Neo says:

      Probably, the main thing is that they’re not tight. Don’t lace real tight either, I’ve found. I’ve found thermal insoles to help, but the ground (and thus floors) tend to be colder here

      Liked by 1 person

  32. the unit says:

    Do I remember back some time ago you said you favor Dodge (Ram) trucks? If so, have you any experience with the 4.7 L? My wife and her two sisters inherited their brother’s (through probate/no will) 2013 Standard Cab, 1500, lwb,4×4, 58K miles. Offered to sell to me.
    Mixed reviews on discussion boards about engine, towing ability, and dependability.
    Considering buying as my old Silverado is 23 with 275K miles. Still, it might outlast me. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Neo says:

      It’s what 270 or so cu in, so it’s not going to be a great towing engine, probably roughly equivalent to an old 318, technology helps the output. I had the V6 in a half ton van and it was fine, although got lousy mileage at 75 or so on the freeway. I’d look at what you have to do at 100K miles, that’s usually when they can get expensive. I wouldn’t not buy it on that basis, mechanically Dodge’s are usually at least as good as anybody’s traditionally till the body falls off. I, personally, tend to ignore the 1500s, cause I’m at least as much of a Cummins fan as I am of Dodge. But my luck with Dodges generally has been better than anything else.

      Liked by 1 person

      • the unit says:

        Wife interested in my buying to tow a medium travel trailer to Miami to visit our son. I say medium, maybe 20 foot, ie Coachman or similar.
        Still might be a good deal for me and my truck love. They’ll take 12K…and my wife gets a third.
        And we have join account. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • Neo says:

          I’d guess it would do it, although maybe not at freeway speed, I doubt it would pull it to say Denver, though. So essentially 8K, that’s pretty good deal, I think. But that’s merely an opinion.

          Liked by 1 person

        • the unit says:

          Wow, I’m convinced. My ’66 Chrysler 300 was a 318. Extremely underpowered and rode like a truck.
          Was glad Camille got it. 🙂
          Still may consider it to go to the post office and doctor, which probably will be the extent of my travels.
          Which reminds me, bro-in-law never went to the doc. Made it to 73, which isn’t too bad, I guess. But, just sayin’, get a check up. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • Neo says:

          Yeah, so was my 70 Polara with a 383 2 bbl. Those were bloody heavy cars, and the ride was pretty bad. Things have improved and D1500s are basically cars. My V6 van actually wasn’t bad on acceleration, no Hemi Daytona certainly, but not all that bad. Lot of it has to do with the gearing really. First thing I drove on the road was a 1951 tonner with the old L6 that Dodge designed in the 20s, it was fine to about 40, needed a couple of OD gears, but it had something like a 4:88 rear end.

          Liked by 1 person

        • the unit says:

          Yeah, the discussion boards talking about the towing, a back and forth about gearing ratios and even tire size. All outside my understanding.
          I saw on one site the 2013 Ram 1500 had axle 3.82 (I think, as can’t find that site now).
          All these discussion guys talk like you could just simply install in different ratios.
          Beats me, I even read this truck may have two spark plugs per cylinder and sometimes runs on four cylinders, some button to push.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Neo says:

          You can, but you need some precision and know how to get it right, not really a shade tree operation. 3.82 sounds pretty reasonable for it anyway. And it probably has an overdrive in transmission as well.

          It’s entirely possible, and changing them may be quite the project. For the Ford Expedition we had the procedure started with “Remove the Body”. When we were young, many fire trucks had too complete ignition systems for reliability, now it’s more for getting a clean burn of all the fuel. I know essentially nothing of that engine so I’m guessing, not advising. But OTOH, the new computerized systems are much better than the old stuff, but when they break they can be a cast iron witch to troubleshoot.

          Liked by 1 person

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