Ideology > Engineeering and Logic

A couple of reports mixed here, because they go to the same point. First, South Australia had a power outage last week. Ordinarily, that’s not news, but in this case, I gather nearly the whole state was off. Why? Here’s Andrew Bolt to tell you.

South Australia ran to Canberra for subsidies to protect Arium Steel – which has now been shut down in part because of the state’s ruinously juvenile obsession with green power. Terry McCrann and Nick Cater expose how green power is killing South Australia.

Terry McCrann:

Clements Gap wind plant in South Australia

Clements Gap wind plant in South Australia

ABSOLUTE unmitigated, undiluted bullcrap: the desperate, indeed seriously panicked claim that South Australia going ‘all North Korea black’ last week had nothing to do with its embrace of useless wind ‘power’ (sic).

Now for the facts. Yes, the proximate cause of SA’s power failure was transmission towers being blown down in last week’s storm.

We’ll put aside the rather important question of whether they were blown down because they weren’t built robustly enough, because the scattered nature of wind turbines requires so many of them that it would cost too much to ‘gold plate them.’

That said, despite the additional lies told by the global warming fanatics, the winds in SA last Wednesday were neither unprecedented nor particularly violent. They didn’t top 100kmh; they didn’t even reach the speeds of the lowest level of cyclone.

The key question, the question that utterly damns the SA reliance on wind turbines, is what happened next — when SA ‘lost’ its wind generation.

As AEMO — the Australian Energy Market Operator, — explained in a press statement last Thursday, the damaged transmission lines supported supply and generation north of Adelaide.

But “the reason why a cascading failure of the remainder of the South Australia network occurred is still to be identified and is subject to further investigation.”

Without stating so, AEMO then gave precisely the answer.

About 1900 megawatts (MW) was being consumed in South Australia at the time of the power failure, AEMO said; the SA generation — mostly, my words, wind from the north — was “being supported” by a total of 610MW from Victoria.

What AEMO didn’t say, but is blindingly obvious, when wind ‘generation’ dropped from around 900MW to zero literally in an instant, SA just as instantly ‘asked’ Victoria for that 900MW.

So suddenly the long extension cord from the coal-fired stations in the Latrobe Valley was being asked to increase its supply from around 500MW to around 1500MW.

In effect, the ‘wind-powered state’ wanted to ‘borrow’ almost the entire output of one of Victoria’s coal-fired stations. And it wanted to borrow it immediately, at 4.18pm last Wednesday. The cord just ‘shorted out.’ …

There are two damning, utterly undeniable points that prove it was ‘all about wind.’

If you are going to rely on the unreliable power ‘sources’ of wind or solar, when the wind don’t blow and/ or the sun don’t shine, you have to have back-up from a reliable power source, either gas or coal.

Further, you have to keep that back-up turning over, because when the wind don’t blow or the sun don’t shine, it can go from 1000MW to zip pretty quickly — even without dodgy towers falling over.

Which of course makes the whole exercise a farce. Why have wind at all to replace coal or gas if you still have to keep the coal/gas?

Unless, and this is the critical second point, you try to do it on the cheap — both the real cheap and the ‘environmental’ cheap: by using that long extension cord to ‘someone else’s dirty power.’ Except Wednesday showed us exactly what can happen when you do that.

Nick Cater:

It is barely two months since Weatherill demanded $100 million from Canberra to keep Arrium Steel working. Yet it was the blackout, a consequence of Labor’s renewables policy, that ­finally shut the Whyalla plant down. Enforced idleness is costing Arrium about $4m a day.

Green politics really is shutting down Whyalla, after all.

South Australia is also running to other states to supply it with the kind of power it deems too dirty to produce itself – yet needs to keep on the lights:

The state’s capacity to produce its own baseload power from fossil fuels has rapidly diminished. The state’s four largest power stations — two at Port Augusta, Pelican Point and Torrens Island A — will have closed or will be in mothballs by this time next year, made unviable by unpredictable deluges of cheap wind power.

The combined lost capacity of 1250MW represents a third of the state’s generating potential. What has filled the gap? You’ve guessed it: imported power from Victoria, generated mostly by the same brown coal deemed unacceptable in oh-so-clean South Australia.

Upgrading the national grid to give South Australians the comfort of a reliable energy supply will be expensive. The costs inevitably will push up power prices, passed on as another hidden cost of Labor’s carbon fetish.

via Renewable Power Australia – Green Power Works When There’s A Daddy To Pay | PA Pundits – International

And that’s the thing if the sun don’t shine, or the wind don’t blow (or blows too hard) your solar and wind power don’t work. And no, nobody has an efficient means to store power. A lot of taxpayer’s money has been squandered on it though, with very limited results. And what South Australia has done is exactly what California is doing, for the same political reason. Eventually, it will have similar results.

And it diffuses the grid, which has other problems, such as security. I have wondered for years when I would write this story, because, to me, it’s the obvious way to disrupt life in the west, disrupt the power grid. From Weaponsman.

In 2014, we asked, “What can a mere rifle do?” in reference to a standoff attack on a Pacific Gas and Electric power substation in Metcalf, California.

The answer, in that case, was to blow the transformers to hell and gone, and bug out. To date, there has been no arrest in the case; at one time, a DHS official suggested it was an inside job. There have been subsequent attacks, despite attempts to upgrade security; indeed, once, criminals cut through a fence and made off with equipment that was on site — for security upgrades.

Now, there’s been a new rifle attack on a station, in rural Utah. It appears to have been less sophisticated and less persistent than the California attack, but more effective — the attacker or attackers blew the station off the grid with as few as three rifle shots.

On Sunday, somebody went to the remote substation located between Kanab and Page, Arizona, and fired at least three rounds with a high-powered rifle into the main transformer, knocking out power to an estimated 13,000 customers in Kanab, Big Water, Orderville, Glendale, Hatch and surrounding towns in Garfield County.

“Just from the looks of it, it looked more criminal than vandalism because they knew exactly where to shoot it and they shot it multiple times in the same spot,” Brown said. “For somebody to know exactly where that substation is and how to hit it exactly like he did, (it) seems like he’d have to have knowledge of that.”

Countermeasures that can be used in cases like this are limited. In California, the power company deployed cameras, but they’re investigative, not preventive, technology; and constructed blinds that block sight of the most vulnerable transformers, but they’re concealment, not cover. In Utah, the power company has asked for tips, and done something even less practical than the Californians:

Now you go and combine those stories, well if the bad guys do, we’re likely to go back a (or a few) hundred years. Substations are really hard to secure, and a rifle is the bottom level threat. There are others, and they would be more catastrophic.

Not sure there is really an answer, there’s not in this article, but it’s something we should be thinking about – at all levels.

And then there is the EMP threat attack, by the NORKs and others.

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About NEO
Lineman, Electrician, Industrial Control technician, Staking Engineer, Inspector, Quality Assurance Manager, Chief Operations Officer

61 Responses to Ideology > Engineeering and Logic

  1. the unit says:

    Project requiring possible engineering and logic concerning residential power line
    Need: Trim over head and over reaching tree limbs around incoming power line to home
    Preliminary need to clean out pickup truck bed so that step ladder can be set up in it. Bed filled with junk and years of leaves actually composted, … with earth worms. Done. Now needs washing out. Problem though is water in bed runs toward the front. Engineering ideas. Lift and shim the front of the bed so it tilts to the rear. Naw! Jack up the front higher than the back. Naw, jack only lifts one side of an axle to change flat.
    Engineering solution: Park the truck with the rear wheels in the driveway mudhole where the dirt is gone from tracking out when driving through over the years (choice as multiple mudholes in driveway). Front wheels up higher above the mudhole depression. A-la, water now runs out back of bed! Preliminaries done.
    Next step ladder secured and stable in bed, proper positioning of truck so limbs don’t fall on cutter-person (me). Pole saw at hand. Now job accomplished. Secondary attribute: internet and tv cable line cleared as well.
    Morning done, break time, check NEO’s site and see if I’m able to comment today. Only a break, still plenty of day light. Clean up next. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      Sounds like a good day, so far, Unit! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • the unit says:

        Yep, and all loaded on trailer for early trip to county landfill. Got called in for supper, barbecued ribs! Logic said go eat. Then have an hour left to tie down good…then time to lie down. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Yay! You! You accomplished more than I did today. Not that that was difficult! 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • the unit says:

          Even tho it’s not Saturday yet I’ll have to shower tonight ’cause my hair is full of wood chips from sawing overhead. Looked high and low for my old ball cap to wear for the job, but couldn’t find it. Just as well. Working up in tree I’d have to turn the bill backwards. That looks stupid. Guess a shower won’t hurt. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Mine always was – even with a brain bucket on. Showers rarely hurt, as long as you don’t fall down! 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

  2. the unit says:

    Sort of a continuation of situation above. Got some more pole saw business 300 feet away from 120 volt source. Would really like to put my Generac 5500 in truck bed for power. However it has floating neutral and manual says have frame properly earth grounded. Local Generac service guy says don’t worry because pole saw is plastic handle and switch. Internet discussion sites say don’t worry because you’re using on board receptacles. Also manual says all this proper grounding is code required and MAY help prevent electric shock.
    I’ve also read sometime ago that grounding rod needs to go down to the water table.
    Any thoughts?

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      Generac guy is mostly correct, if you use mostly double insulated tools. And in fact even if you don’t. Here’s the thing, if you’ve reasonable tires on the pick-up, it’s sort of a floating ground, itself.

      What I would do, and what I always did, was to bond the generator to the vehicle frame, so there is no possibility of making yourself a circuit between. Then I would use an in-line GFCI cord on everything.

      In fact, that is pretty much what OSHA mandates as well, for construction sites. In the POCOs when working hot lines, we either drive temporary ground rods, or bond our trucks to the lines neutral, but that’s a step way to far for you, and there we have specific problems to solve.

      In any case, the GFCI cord is a proven lifesaver, even on older central stations systems. Easily worth the money.

      Liked by 1 person

      • the unit says:

        Great. I can do that bonding gen frame to truck frame and get GFCI cord. I looked the cord up and they are short. I’ll need to use say a 50 ft. extension cord from it to saw. That ok?

        Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Sure, as long as your cord is good. That’s what I always did on a service truck with a welder, as well. There are some commercial GFCI cords that are 50-100 ft. long, but don’t know how available they are, mostly I see them in construction supply catalogs. Remember this as well, A GFCI makes an old two wire outlet nearly as safe as a current one. It’s one of the few ways to replace a two wire outlet without rewiring, legally.

          Liked by 1 person

        • the unit says:

          OK. And thanks.

          Like

  3. the unit says:

    Finally got the generator in the truck. Finished today. All grounded to truck frame and in line GFCI. Not knowing much about electricity, in event of a short will the ground wire and truck be hot for anyone touching it?

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      No, well not for more that five cycles or so, depending on how fast the breaker trips, and the short would have to be ahead of the GFCI. Should be as safe as anything can be. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • the unit says:

        Some things I just can’t understand. Still amazed that when traveling by car if a fly is perched on the headrest of my seat or the passenger seat, when it take off flying why doesn’t it slam into the rear window? I mean if I’m jumping on a trampoline and someone moves it while I’m in the air, I hit the ground probably on my butt with my luck. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          I’m guessing that when that fly flies out the window, he goes out of control, at least for a while. Remember he’s moving when he’s on the headrest at the same speed you are, as is the air in the car (more or less, anyway) 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • the unit says:

          Amazing grace. 🙂

          Like

        • NEO says:

          🙂 Indeed.

          Liked by 1 person

  4. the unit says:

    All working great. Trimmed limbs down long drive, far away from electrical outlet. Just one more thing to do. Over-ride the safety button keeping the trigger of pole saw from pressing in. My Dupuytren’s thumb needs a splint this morning. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      I know, the things we do to override Darwin! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  5. the unit says:

    Well, all you advised me on has worked out great. Gen hook-up in truck, GFCI breaker, good extension cord and all. However the trees and limbs fought back like a Founding Patriot! On one cut the limb twisted while sliding down another and pinched the bar. Had to let go of the saw and go pull on the branches. Then the saw fell and busted one side of the cowling holding the saw on the pole. Fixed that by replacing it with a metal electrical outlet cover with no receptacle cut outs. Drilled a hole in the middle for the mounting bolt to go through. Next job limbs had wirey vines and they would ride the chain back to the sprocket and get under the chain/bar. Had to stop and reload the chain on the bar. Finally through that too. All necessary limbs down now. Will just have occasional maintenance work there.
    New job. Most of what I’ve trimmed and cut was around drive and house and hauled to the dump. About 20 trailer loads I think. Starting on the back overgrown couple of acres. Decided to do burning instead of hauling before my part of FL begins “no burn” days. Had many dried water oak I’ve cut previously. First two piles burned fast, no problem. But then…latest pile of something else just won’t burn. Tried on 4/12 with no luck. Used charcoal lighter, no luck. Let sit with tarp cover to keep even the morning dew off ’til today, 4/17. Charcoal lighter again, still no burn. Even with the no no of using gasoline…no burn. This “something else” is I don’t know what. It’s been cut for weeks too. None of my neighbors have the stuff. Think it was some foreign something that was mixed in horse feed that the horses spread around in excrement. Grows looking like a peacock tail but not the colors. Used Blazer 4wd to pull up by roots. All I can figure is this stuff is from the plant kingdom and has received salvation. Will not burn. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      Darned if I know, haven’t hit anything I couldn’t get to burn eventually. Gasolines not very effective, it burns too fast, I’ve had better luck with diesel, but it tends to smoke. I hear that, we had ‘red flag’ days here in February. Had one out hear that we used half a service tank of gas on, finally had chip the garbage, ugly stuff. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • the unit says:

        On my way to do errands. Will see if anybody still has those fireplace logs in stock left over. Thanks, will get a gallon of diesel too. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          That’s a good idea! I’ve occasionally used charcoal as well, got to get it hot and keep it hot for a while. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • the unit says:

          Yes. hot! Guess I been trying to get it going anyway I can. Years ago after a friend and I went to the movies his mother asked what we went to see. We told her it was ‘Some Like It Hot’ to which she responded “Some like it hot and some like it anyway they can get it.” 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Ain’t that the truth! 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • the unit says:

          Fireplace log did the trick. Just cut off a third so will have more for next burn. Will use the diesel in the dually. Won’t go to waste. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Outstanding! 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

  6. the unit says:

    This isn’t energy so much, but still engineering and logic. Pool present turning into nightmare. Filling got to a point of no water rise, and starting to drop faster than hose and city water can supply. Noticed Friday night. No service people available on weekends, and it’s paid for already you know. Water level down and liner starting to sag.
    Tomorrow will be interesting day! I’m sure what I’ll say to service guy will seem smart alecky to the least. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      Well, at least the lawn got watered, I suspect! That’s a problem with them, we had one when I was a kid, and that happened a few times! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • the unit says:

        Yeah, in ground 40 x 20. I’m drowning worms! PETA alert! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          That you are, gonna have to aerate the lawn! Never ends, does it? 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • the unit says:

          Janie will have to be my lady in waiting. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          That would be nice, I reckon! 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • the unit says:

          Make that lady in watering. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          That does make more sense! 😉

          Liked by 1 person

  7. the unit says:

    Maybe I can post this comment in the logic section of this particular blog site. There is no other blog I enjoy as much as Nebraska Energy Observer. When blogs and reader/commentators disappear I always wonder…what happened to them? I’m going to be away for some time and I don’t want you to think I wasn’t interested in this blog any longer.
    I don’t know what else to call it, but a calamity has happened in the life of a dearly loved one. The emotional and economic collateral damage has carried over to other family members, of course including myself.
    I’ll be reading some, but soon I’ll be physically away from home and internet activity tending to the situation. I won’t be commenting though because my heart and mind will be distracted from consideration of other problems and even the pleasant insights you often write about.
    I am ok and hopefully will gather myself together and be back fully before it’s all over.
    The it’s…, whatever. I’ll never ask “What difference, at this point, does it make?” 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      Thanks for letting us know, and do take care. We’ll be thinking of you, and praying for all concerned. Vaya con Dios, friends are too damned rare. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  8. the unit says:

    Months ago you suggested for my generator safety to have reasonably good tires and a good extension cord. Will this one do? 🙂
    http://www.fakeposters.com/posters/electricians/

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      Sad part is that I’ve seen much worse! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  9. the unit says:

    Think this fits well in Engineering and Logic.
    Ran across interesting ad pop-up @ Drudge for Pilatus planes. Never heard of them before so looked up.
    Max. takeoff weight: 4,740 kg (10,450 lb)
    Maximum landing weight: 4,500 kg (9,921 lb)
    Sounds like a good airship to take two or three progressives up at take off and you know what before landing. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      They are quite the plane for a single. If I recall can be configured for about 7 passenger or cargo, comparable to a Beech King Air, plus more utility. Yeah, I do, longer range with a lighter load! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • the unit says:

        Yeah, longer range. Though I think you got my point of what to do with an excessive load of progressives if for some reason you needed to to achieve maximum landing weight before expending sufficient fuel weight. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          I think I did. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • the unit says:

          That’s the logic part. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Yep, a bit Stalinesque, though. I’d prefer the Graybar Hotel, actually. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • the unit says:

          Works for me too! 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Just finishing up today’s. Uranium One, Wow! Leavenworth called, they’ve got vacancies. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • the unit says:

          Yeah, I read maybe even Mueller will need a room there too on that issue. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Looks like it to me. Maybe he can bunk with Rosenstein. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • the unit says:

          Call it a Reunion at the Graybar. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          That’ll work! 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • the unit says:

          I’ll go for now and let you finish your piece. Look forward to reading.

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          It’s on the schedule, I think you’ll like it, even if it’s another wall of text, as they say at Ace’s.

          Liked by 1 person

  10. the unit says:

    How’s this for logic? Had strange thought, question, while resting overnight. Remember a few blog articles back how excited I was to go OT to tell of new vet benefit to be able to shop online at service exchanges? Why now, just short of 50 years after my discharge from active duty? Maybe here’s why. April 16, 2009: “Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano said Wednesday that she was briefed before the release of a controversial intelligence assessment and that she stands by the report, which lists returning veterans among terrorist risks to the U.S.” There’s 18 million of us. Ship goods and products to their address, you know where they are.
    Paranoid much, huh? 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      You’re starting to sound like me. One of my favorite sayings is, “Even paranoids have enemies”. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  11. the unit says:

    Short and sweet as much as I can.
    Leviton wall receptacle hot terminal melted.
    Wires from wall so short, I had to go with another plug-in.
    Trip to store for new one.
    Got home, 12 ga. wires wouldn’t plug in.
    Second trip to store.
    Salesman said it was because screws were screwed in. ?
    Got home with same one, still wouldn’t plug in with screws screwed out.
    Third trip to store.
    Different salesman sold me a 20/125 different from regular plug-in. Insert straight wire in slot right at screw and then screw down tight.
    Got home, worked fine. Should be happy as I wanted to use the screws in the first place instead of the plug-in.
    Of course you know why the first one wouldn’t work. First salesman didn’t. 🙂
    P.S. Maybe they don’t make 15/125 to accept 12 ga. anymore. Electrical Safety? Maybe I should change out all old ones throughout house?

    Above…that’s what I wrote earlier to be concise, but since you said looking forward to it. More detail to do it justice. We want justice. 🙂
    I pretty much thought the person didn’t know what he was talking about. With the old one the screws had nothing to do with the plug-in. But said to myself maybe things have changed. Then though with the screws turned out he took a wire with insulation on it and stuck in one hole, “see it goes in.” I took hold and pulled it out, stuck in about 1/16 in. He said he “didn’t want to stick in too far.”
    By the third trip (next day) I had magnified the tiniest tiny raised letter printing that was the same color as the receptacle and it said 12 ga. at screws, 14 ga. for plug-in. The second salesman who I knew knows stuff and wasn’t there the day before helped me this time. We checked and they all (Eaton and Leviton) said 14 ga. plug-in).
    As for the wires being too short, I was afraid to try to straighten too much as been bent up in wall box since ’72. Afraid to straighten, curve terminal end and stuff back in box, afraid that might work harden and possibly break.
    As for plug-in, I’ve always thought connection not as secure as screw tighten well. However these in house been there since ’72 (we here since ’83).
    As for the melted hot terminal, the only constant load on it was battery box for when power goes off, with modem, wifi, and printer plugged into it. House has copper wire, maybe old Leviton internal metal corroded bad?
    As for the hardware, first traded there in ’68 long before it became an ACE, now a DO IT BEST. Always was good, but now more like a gift shop with all sorts of trinkets and stuff, as well as all the hardware and lumber. Even outdoor clothing lines. My really old timer salespersons, Ben retired 20 years ago and dead…Bob retired 10 years ago and last I heard serious heart problems, maybe deceased as well. Can’t ask about him as no one there was there then to remember either. 🙂
    Well, back to the brakes. Get air out of MC and then gravity bleed lines.Will read today’s blog later. ’til later. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      Yep, a code change in 1999 or maybe 2002 cycle. The proper feed for a 15 A outlet is #14 wire and that is all that will go in the quick wire holes (I won’t use them-I consider them hazardous) you can and should loop the wire around the screws, or use 15/20 amp outlets, which are more expensive. That said, there are outlets (Leviton, I think) I use Eagle mostly, where the screw runs the back wire holes as well, They are OK and faster than looping. In your spot, I would have spliced a bit of wire on to the wire in the wall to give me some clearance, (Code requires six inches from the entrance to the box and about four from the wall.)but I have lots of scrap. 🙂

      Leviton stuff is OK, but like anything else, if bought by price (like when you’re bidding a job), well there are better available, but the price goes up. I bid using commercial or better in kitchen and bath, but most outlets have a table lamp, if that. Sounds to me like the quick wire got you on this one. That, of course, is why the box is required.

      Hardware store are a difficult retail thing, my local one (where I worked a few years) started out as Coast to Coast and after a few changes is an Our Own. It’s still downtown or would also have morphed to a farm store – the stuff is available. But we had stock at least ten years old still in inventory, we pretty much always had what you needed, but it’s an expensive business model, 50X100 foot store, inventory value about 1/4 million. And it’s hard to have relevant expertise in all the stuff you sell, the owner was pretty good in plumbing, and I handled electrical questions, the rest were basically clerks, who did at least know where things were.

      Good luck with the brakes! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • the unit says:

        Both were Eaton. First one 99 cents. Next $3 something. So don’t have loop, but under very tight screw. Screwing is like riding a bike, don’t forget. Thanks for the info. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          My supply house doesn’t carry those, but in truth, all I look for is the UL label other than certain thing I care about, like the connectors.

          Liked by 1 person

      • the unit says:

        Oh, and both stamped Made in America. Surprised! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          The lines have been in place since the 60s when we went to grounded outlets (that wasn’t that big a transition either), and we are practically the only ones using our configuration, maybe Canada, Mexico, and parts of the Philippines as far as I remember.

          I don’t remember ever looking, for me it’s a commodity item. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

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