Something Different

ss-united-statesI had a wild hair yesterday and suddenly wondered if one could still sail on a regularly scheduled ocean liner across the Atlantic. Turns out you can, on Cunard’s Queen Mary II. From what I read, I suspect it would be competitive with first class airfare, and lots more comfortable. But I found something else, even more interesting.

Navy League of the United States

Pacific Merchant Marine Council

Certificate of Adoption & Support

Whereas the Navy League of the United States for over one hundred years has expressed its patriotism, commitment, strength of spirit, and support for the Navy, Marine Corp, Coast Guard, and U. S. flag Merchant Marine, and

Whereas an important objective of the Navy League is to improve understanding of and appreciation for our country’s waterborne vessels past and present and those who have served and are serving aboard, and

Whereas to further these objectives, Navy League councils “adopt” ships, squadrons, and stations, and

Whereas the SS United States is the most outstanding testimony our passenger liners and Merchant Marine played in the maritime commerce of our great nation’s history, be it hereby resolved:

The Navy League of the United States Pacific Merchant Marine Council,recognizing the SS United States’ flagship career, hereby adopts and commits to support her future life by aiding the SS United States Conservancy. Fair winds and following seas Conservancy!

__________________________________ 4 June 2010

Phelps Hobart, President

Pacific Merchant Marine Council Navy League of the United States

Acknowledged and accepted with gratitude.

__________________________________ 4 June 2010

Susan Gibbs, President

SS United States Conservancy

_________________________________ 4 June 2010

Dan McSweeney, Executive Director

SS United States Conservancy



In July 1952, on its maiden voyage, the S.S. United States shattered the record for the fastest crossing of the Atlantic by a passenger ship, steaming from New York to Le Havre in less than four days. In 1969, when it went into dry dock in Newport News, Virginia, and its crew members left their belongings in their cabins, not knowing they’d never sail on it again, it still held the record. And it still does today—though it’s been retired for nearly 47 years, and motionless at a pier in Philadelphia for nearly 20.

“The ship is a little worse for wear,” Susan Gibbs said not long ago as we toured the rusting hulk. She is the granddaughter of the ship’s designer, William Francis Gibbs. “But it’s important to keep in mind that she was so overbuilt, she’s still structurally sound. The bones are solid. So it’s not a pipe dream to imagine she could be resurrected.”

On February 4, Crystal Cruises announced that it had signed an option to purchase the ship from the S.S. United States Conservancy, the nonprofit that Gibbs directs. Crystal—a subsidiary of a cruise-and-resort company called Genting Hong Kong—plans to spend this year studying the feasibility of restoring the United States as a luxury cruise vessel, which could cost as much as $700 million. In the meantime it will pay the $60,000 or so a month it costs to maintain the ship.

via The World’s Fastest Ocean Liner May Be Restored to Sail Again Read the comments as well. Some of them tell how they emigrated to America on her, and are quite moving.
There are four more videos there, they’re all good.
One thing that strikes me, this ship embodies what we learned in World War II. It was designed to transport an entire army division anyplace in the world, nonstop, and able to keep up with, or pass, a naval task force. A fascinating ship. And yes, I do remember hearing about her when I was a kid. Be fun to see her come back. A worthy project.
I am also reminded that John Paul Jones said this.
I wish to have no connection with any ship that does not sail fast;
for I intend to go in harm’s way.
Pretty much describes the way we’ve always done it, and the SS United States is no exception.
Advertisements

About NEO
Lineman, Electrician, Industrial Control technician, Staking Engineer, Inspector, Quality Assurance Manager, Chief Operations Officer

9 Responses to Something Different

  1. the unit says:

    “Something Different!” Ah yes! Interesting. Not political. Breather. So tired of it all about the candidates.
    So $700 million and she can sail the seven seas again. But wait. Just wait a little longer. 47 years may not be long enough for a miracle like what happened to me. Purely anecdotal though.
    A few weeks ago a trailer harness hot wire got scraped and the insulation gone let the wire short to the frame. Smoke was coming from my steering column when brakes and blinker applied. Stopped and grabbed the fire extinguisher. Looked around and saw the situation, taped the exposure until I got home. No more smoke.
    First thing was to fix the harness right and using some flexible wire protector over them. Was all well now? Well no. At every traffic light I had to roll my window down for a driver to tell me I had a brake light not working. Decided to leave window down. Naw. For safety and in case the law gets behind me, gotta fix this. Ok, go home and check about that. Fuse ok, bulbs ok. Could be circuit board in tail light. But what about smoking steering column? Figured problem there. There is a multi-switch in there that works the hazard flasher, blinkers, wipers, cruise control and who knows what else. It’s smart too. Knows when signal down same wire is brakes or blinkers. It threw me though as to why other brake light worked. Still don’t know. I learned how smart it is because it smarted when the part and labor was going to be over $400.
    Hold that money (and hold the millions SS United States). I dropped a 1157 socket and bulb in the tail light hole with the factory do hicky, ran the hot wire to the battery, grounded the socket, and put in a momentary door bell switch to send current to my new brake light. Heck what the heck some people drive the whole vehicle by hand. Works great.
    Now the anecdotal part. Now couple of weeks later I hook up my utility trailer and check the lights. Got a wedge made to go between seat and brake petal to help with check. Went to look expecting only one brake light to be on ’cause I wasn’t pushing door bell switch. Lo and behold I had complete brake lights, vehicle and trailer. What? It fixed itself? Miracle?
    So don’t rush SS United States you might have a miracle too.
    And furthermore, I disproved Einstein’s quote about insanity. I must have pushed my brake petal a hundred times during the week or so I knew my light was out not knowing when it started working. When did it start? I hit the petal and finally got a different result!
    I shoulda waited. It was the steering column, not me smoking.
    Sorry for the long comment. “Something Different.” For Halloween! But it’s true too. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      Yep, I’ve had ’em just as strange, and you should see what industrial control systems can do, some I still can’t explain cause I ain’t got a clue why they did what they did. Had the engineer that designed it standing next to me one time – he was swearing louder than I was! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • the unit says:

        Good not just me! And I’ve read others wired for music like me. Robert Schumann, famous composer, for one. Toward the end of his life. I am getting on up there you know. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          So are we all, Unit. One day at a time! 😉

          Liked by 1 person

        • the unit says:

          Yep. Tonight I hit the sack to “I walk the line.” Uh-oh, politics creeping in here. Been thinking too much of the voting line. But looking forward to walking it. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Yepp-er, me too. I suspect its going top sneak back in here too. Kind important (or is that impotent?) 😐

          Like

        • the unit says:

          Yeah, impotent like my one vote has always been. I’ll love it though like a burning ring of fire come election day. I’m decided though, even though I’ve been told I’ll be on the wrong side of history…again. Still I be a sleeping listening to) rock-a-by baby, not the devil came down to Georgia. 🙂

          Liked by 2 people

        • NEO says:

          Well, welcome to the dark side – where good and evil still exist! 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

  2. “One thing that strikes me, this ship embodies what we learned in World War II. It was designed to transport an entire army division anyplace in the world, nonstop, and able to keep up with, or pass, a naval task force. A fascinating ship. And yes, I do remember hearing about her when I was a kid. Be fun to see her come back. A worthy project.”

    So we learned from the Wolfpack era of submarine warfare and the emergence of Naval air power that it is a good idea for a transport ship to outpace its protective cover? This is not only untrue, but counter to what was learned. Your statement is completely incorrect.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s