Castel Gandolfo and Economics

giardino_degli_specchi_castel_gandolfo_ii_20141006Interesting story here. Note that I’m not picking this as either pro or con Catholic. For me, today, it is purely an economic story and an example of why equality of income is such a bad idea.

Speaking of Francis, I was told by a priest here that the Holy Father has visited a handful of times but has never spent the night or greeted the staff, only stopping to consult the Jesuits in residence. That’s rather bad manners, I should think. It takes only a little magnanimity to imagine what a papal visit means to the staff here. They keep the place in pristine readiness all year round, eagerly awaiting the pope’s arrival, as their fathers’ fathers have done proudly for generations, and His Holiness won’t deign to stop by for the evening! I mean, he has an image to keep up, but isn’t this a bit snobbish? The poor people there have had to open the gardens and palace to tourists just to find something to do with the place and replace lost revenue.

Father also mentioned that he felt a bit sorry for the townspeople, because with the papal court no longer summering at the palace, the local economy is taking a hard hit. Usually, the entire Vatican is run from the palace from June to October, and the restaurants do good business with the influx of papal staff. No longer. “I guess the papal gardener is in a very enviable position!” “That’s right – it’s actually a hereditary position. Like many of these jobs, they’ve been in the same family for generations.”

These revelations added a layer: the merciless enforcement of mercy under Francis’s pontificate has more concrete ramifications in Rome for those who faithfully serve the papacy. It turns scores of talented people out of their jobs. From the great artists who wove the papal vestments and write the papal masses to the humble village family who has kept his garden for generations, there is a great cadre of people who give their lives in noble service to the Church.

via What ‘Humility’ Means for the Papal Staff |

Interesting isn’t it, that the Pope’s refusal to use Castel Gandolfo costs the neighborhood a goodly chunk of change. Of course, it’s pretty obvious when one thinks through it, and indeed, at least some of that money is likely spent in Rome instead.

But his grandstanding (at least that is what it looks like to me), showing off his humility, which to my mind doesn’t really match his statements, hurts those around him. Who’d a thunk it? Just about everybody with any common sense, which pretty much leaves out anyone who thinks virtue signaling a good thing.

Doesn’t make him any better or worse than anybody else, really. We all do things that hurt others although not all of us believe that hurting other people shows virtue (except maybe as a soldier).

What this really shows is that not thinking deeply enough about your actions has consequences. That’s why we call it ‘the law of unintended consequences’, after all.

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13 Responses to Castel Gandolfo and Economics

  1. Interesting perspective worth discussing. The comparative avoidance of the trappings of the papacy is certainly hurting this community, but to counter I would wonder if the money saved is being put to a better use towards Church missions in countries with much lower standards of living. The Catholic Church, after all, is a global institution with beneficiaries across the globe, not just in Central Italy.

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      Good comment. I don’t know either, but I rather doubt it. The way it reads, it sounds like what’s hurting here is the lack of spending by members of the court, not so much the Church irself.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Hypocrisy, “minicry” and pretended sanctity surely comes first to my mind! And of course I say this about so-called “Francis”! No love lost here for me! (But, I bet ya knew that! 😉 ) Now, I will shut up, taking shots at “Francis” is too easy for me, which of course he well deserves, and almost at every level!

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      Easy for me, as well. Which, of course, is why I tried to avoid it (mostly) in the article. 😉

      Like

      • I have been to Castel Gandolfo once (long story), very beautiful!

        Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          It sure looks so in pictures.

          Like

  3. the unit says:

    Staff must not have contributed to Crony Catholicism. Make the cadre great again! 🙂
    http://www.catholicamericanthinker.com/Crony-Catholicism.html

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      Quite the article. They are getting USG money to resettle ‘refugees’. So are most of the other churches, more than he states, in fact. If you remember, I wrote on this too, here:

      https://jessicahof.wordpress.com/2017/02/18/the-refugee-resettlement-business/

      A dirty business, but evil might (or might not) be putting it a little strongly. Indeed so! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • the unit says:

        Yes I visited AATW that day and read your article. Very detailed and good accounting of what’s going on for the almighty $$$s.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Nothing surprises me anymore with today’s “Papal” Catholicism, especially with the Jesuit “Francis”, it and he has lost the true Gospel of the Lordship & Saviorhood of Jesus Christ. It says one thing traditionally, then with statement and practice does an other! Once again just great hypocrisy, it has become a pretense of true Christian faith/doctrine, and virtue, piety.

      Liked by 1 person

      • True Christianity and Islam are simply NOT doctrinally or theologically connected! As Jesus said: “I am the way, and the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through/by ME.” (John 14: 6) Islam is NOT even close here! Biblical and true “catholic” doctrine-teaching are in reality very exclusive to the Person & Work of Jesus Christ!

        Liked by 1 person

    • Btw Unit, looking at that Traditional Catholic site, was very interesting! Crony Catholicism and Islam? Certainly no way! Indeed say it ain’t so!

      Liked by 1 person

      • And again, I must say that the “god” of today’s culture and many so-called religions, is secular humanism!

        Liked by 1 person

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