Lafayette, nous voilà!

Crowds cheer US general John Pershing in Paris in 1917 as it is announced that America will join the conflict Photo: GETTY

Today is an anniversary, for a hundred years ago today, 6 April 1917, the United States declared war on Imperial Germany. This marked our entrance into what was called until at least 1940, The Great War. But more it marks the beginning of what has come to be called the American century.

The title of the piece is what General Pershing is supposed to have said later that summer when amidst the adoring French crowd, he stood at Marquis de Lafayette’s grave. More likely it was his aide Charles E. Stanton. It marks the point when the Republic for the first time raised its standard for the freedom of other people rather than directly for Americans.

Winston Churchill said that the Great War and World War II constituted another Thirty Years war. He has a point, but others contend that the two wars and the Cold War constitute what they like to call “The Long War”. That too has merit, for all of these conflicts, spanning around 75 years, constitute an almost constant conflict to keep Europe free. One could argue that it still continues.

For those of us that read history, two (or more) wars this close together tend to be interesting. We can trace the junior leaders of one, as the senior commanders of the next. General Marshal was on Pershing’s staff, General Patton led the first armored force in American history, General MacArthur commanded an Infantry Division. One of the pictures I’ve carried in my mind for years is one I cannot find, it showed MacArthur and Patton standing erect in no man’s land conferring with each other. One can almost hear Bill Mauldin yelling back from World War Two, telling then to lie down, they’re likely to draw fire and get somebody hurt! We saw the same thing with Captain Grant and Colonel Lee (and many others) in the Mexican War.

So many things come from the Great War. Phrases such as “Over the Top”, which referred to mounting an attack out of the trenches, and the western revulsion towards chemical weapons. This was when the Marines got their sobriquet of Devil Dogs, bestowed by the Emperor of Germany, Kaiser Bill, himself, which is why we often write it Teufel Hunden. It is also when Belleau Wood lost its name, it is now  “Bois de la Brigade de Marine“, in honor of the 5th and 6th Regiments of Marines. You can read about it here, even if a then obscure Army Artillery captain thought the damned Marines got entirely too much publicity, That captain was Harry Truman.

Here is the first glimmering of American air power, first in the Lafayette Escadrille, and later in the Air Service, which would grow and in 1948 turn into the United States Air Force.

This is when the First Infantry Division became the “Rock of the Marne”. And on and on. And yet we don’t really study this war much. We were heavily involved but not for all that long, and our casualties were pretty low by the standards of the other participants. It also fits between the two biggest wars in American history, our Civil War and World War II, in both of which we had a much more major role, although one tends to think we were decisive in winning the first war as well.

But the results were decisive, indeed. When we entered the war, Britain was nearly starving, and the financial center of the world had moved from London to New York. France was worn out, Russia was making a separate peace. We didn’t win the peace though, the European allies forced through a victor’s peace on Germany, which would nearly guarantee the rematch. The solution of the end of the Ottoman Empire in the middle east has repercussions to this day, China was unhappy that Japan got some territory from it at Versaille.

This war marks the point where America assumed the leadership of what we call the Free World and started Europe on the downward slope we still see today. It may be a causal factor, because of the casualties that the Europeans incurred, especially in the young leaders.

As early as the fall of 1914, Germany simply couldn’t afford to lose, but they couldn’t win either. France and Britain weren’t in much better shape, only America was left to influence the outcome, just as in 1941, although it is close to risible to claim that Britain and France were actually fighting for democracy, although they were probably closer to it than Germany was. But, you know, both did become much more democratic because of the war, even if it was an unintended consequence.

A hundred years ago, today, we can see the first vague outline of the world we live in today, the one that America built on the shoulders of the British Empire.

Today was the day that Congress sent the word, and that word changed the world.

Very good article here in the £ Telegraph

 

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8 Responses to Lafayette, nous voilà!

  1. I like the idea of “The Long War” for WW 1, 2 and the Cold War! But Korea and Vietnam were surely the War, or some kind of war against Communism. But as we can see still sadly the Cold War continues to some real degree! And we still have North Korea!

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      I do too. But we can see them as campaigns, like Wellingtons in Spain, during the Napoleonic fracas. As for the NORKs, sounds like Tillerson may have some hard words for the Chinese, the silliness is getting out of hand.

      Like

      • Can you imagine if the American Military, MacArthur & LeMay would have A-Bombed China during the Korean War? I think they wanted to go 5 or more? That would have so changed the whole region! But of course it was not God’s will or providence! But ya can’t help but wonder what the world would have been like there today especially?

        Liked by 1 person

        • the unit says:

          Would Mao have cared? He said ” China is such a populous nation, it is not as if we cannot do without a few people.” 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • the unit says:

          Well, I mean it could be some or our leaders. “Just give Gram Ma a pill. it is not as if we cannot do without a few Gram Ma’s.” 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Not so many, officially, any more, but some! 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

  2. the unit says:

    After the video there were several choices of other videos to watch. I picked the James Cagney one playing George M. Cohan in ‘Over There.’ Ole Cagney was good. He was another former liberal who was mugged by reality and formulated to conservative by the years of life’s experiences. Patriotism yesterday… domestic extremism today. What “deplorables” huh?

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      Yep, and I love that movie, Yankee Doodle Dandy, from beginning to end, as well as Cohan’s music. 🙂

      Like

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