History and How It Moves Us

Headquarters parlor VF right

Well, guys, the blog is having the best week it has had in months, so I’m grateful to you all. The last year has been a trial, some say that Google changed the algorithms to hurt conservative blogs. I have no idea if that is so, which is why I haven’t written about it, but I can tell you our readership suddenly halved last July, and just in the last week are we approaching where we were. Hope I’m not jinxing it by telling you. 🙂

There have been quite a few times in the last year when I came very close to hanging it up, just seemed like I wasn’t accomplishing anything, but habit is strong, and I haven’t run out of things to say. So on we go. Things look a bit better here in the Great Republic but much remains to be done, and one hopes it will be. So we’ll see.

As I write this, I’m feeling very down. It is an anniversary in my life, something started some years ago on this date, that I thought would be part of my life as long as I was in this world. Sadly it seems it was not to be, and I’m much the poorer for it. Nothing any of us can do, but last night was a quite hard one for me. Well, such is life, it seems.

Winge over, thanks for listening!

This, however, is very interesting. Did you ever wonder how they would see us say a hundred years from now? Two Nerdy History Girls published on that very topic a few days ago.

Susan reporting,

The perception of the historical past is always changing. Each new generation looks at history with fresh eyes, and fresh ideas, too.

Nowhere is this more evident than in how we Americans have treated our historically important buildings. In the years following the American Revolution, many of the place we now venerate most were simply old buildings, allowed to grow more shabby by the year.

Portions of Independence Hall in Philadelphia – the site of the signing of the Declaration of Independence – had already fallen into such disrepair that they were torn down in 1812. Federal Hall in New York City – home of the first Congress as well as where George Washington was inaugurated as the first president – was also demolished barely a generation later in 1812. Built in 1713, the Old State House in Boston witnessed the Boston Massacre, but was later cut up into shops and businesses, and finally suffered the ultimate indignity of having a subway station built into its basement.

But the Centennial celebrations of 1876 brought a new interest in preserving the past. Older buildings were finally beginning to be recognized and preserved for their historical importance. Sometimes, however, these early preservationists often relied on a romanticized version of the 18thc, with some interesting results.

The present-day Valley Forge National Historical Park in Pennsylvania first became recognized as a state park focused on history in 1893. Then, as now, the centerpiece of the park was the stone farm house used by General George Washington as his headquarters during the Continental Army’s winter encampment of 1777-78. Also known as the Isaac Potts House for the original owner, the Headquarters was occupied not only General Washington, but by his wife Martha Washington, seven aides-de-camp, servants, and occasional visitors. The house is not large, especially not considering how many people were squeezed inside it, and from contemporary reports, quarters were cramped, and tempers often ran short.

Follow the link above and keep reading, I, at least, think it is fascinating, how our perceptions have changed. And like them, I wonder what they will think in 2117.`I just have to tell you, a few years ago I was visiting Valley Forge (again) and I happened to find the Chapel. Well, I can’t remember when I have been so moved. A small Gothic chapel, with the battle flags of the Continental Army as the only decoration other than the altar furniture. It moved me deep in my soul, to the point that now, some thirty years later, I remember it as if it was yesterday.

And that is what a historical site, well presented, will do. Suddenly, we will be able to perceive the struggles that our forebears went through to make our today’s possible. It is simply amazing.

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About NEO
Lineman, Electrician, Industrial Control technician, Staking Engineer, Inspector, Quality Assurance Manager, Chief Operations Officer

39 Responses to History and How It Moves Us

  1. George Washington was perhaps in many ways America’s not only first president, but the best model they have seen! I love the Man myself, of course he was really as much a Brit, as an American! God Bless his memory eternal! And let me recommend reading his prayers!

    Hang in there NEO we all ebb and flow! Btw, I am loving life in Utah, simply beautiful, “Beulah Land”!

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      Yep, the best either country produced for many a century. They are excellent.

      That’s the thing isn’t it? Some days it’s better others worse, but we press on.

      I hear that, it is! I’ve got a yen (but no way to scratch it yet) for western Wyoming. We’ll see, maybe some day! 🙂

      Like

      • Where I am at, we get Wyoming visitors, cool people too for the most part! Of course its Summer time. Btw too, I am getting a Harley, my wife is NOT so happy, but we will see if I can get her on the back? 😉

        Liked by 2 people

        • the unit says:

          Take care there now Fr. Robert! 🙂

          Like

        • NEO says:

          If you manage it, I suspect she’ll love it. But Unit has a point there! 🙂

          Like

        • @Unit: Well, I will surely be geared-up, helmet, boots, leather and all! But very little downtown riding, i.e. Vegas, etc And I believe of course in GOD’s Providence! I have had several Triumph’s in my time also, and I can ride. But, ya just never know of course, so I will leave it to the Lord! My times are in His Hand, I will be 68 in late Oct. Lord-willing? The main thing practically, is common sense.. and of course NOT to be stupid! So rock-on and ride! Life is short! 🙂

          Liked by 2 people

        • NEO says:

          I envy you those Triumphs, they were some bike. For the rest, yep, well, I’ve still been known to say, “Here, hold my beer!” 🙂

          Like

        • NEO: Nike makes the SFB Field 8″ leather military British boot (desert color). They run about a half size small, so go half size up, if ya buy them.

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          As opposed to the old US boots, which in my recollection were about a size small. I’m a bit overstocked at the moment (went on a Churchs binge a couple months ago) but I’ll keep them in mind. 🙂

          Like

        • This actually will not be my first Harley, I had a used Sportster in the So Cal., that was “cherry” with one of my Triumphs, but I sold it, as my Chev SS Impala. We have a new Dodge SUV now, which is really my wife’s. Though I drove it to Utah, my wife did not drive a mile! (Due mostly to her health, but she is better now and driving all over town & creation) I am thinking about getting a truck or a jeep, for myself. But I got to have that new Harley! Now I have to decide which one I want? 😉

          Btw, I cannot handle them steel toe boots myself, just too heavy for this old lad! I do have some race bike boots however, but I only wear them usually with my Triumph.

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          I never liked them for that reason, but a lot of places require them, and I do like to eat! 🙂

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    • Btw, I have been using and wearing my military desert boots, with my Levi 513 jeans on of course, hiking around! I love this place! Even if it gets a bit hot! Water discipline of course! 😉 Just about everywhere I go people seem historical and friendly, lots of biblical names in Mormon land also! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • NEO says:

        Makes sense to me, I mostly wear cowboy boots, as is traditional for linemen, but I had a pair of Vietnam era ones, and they were damned fine boots. Water discipline I’m good with, coffee not so much! 😉

        Yep, I like Mormons, they may not be Christians in our understanding, but they are some of the best people I’ve met. 🙂

        Like

        • Amen generally to the Mormon people themselves! And I am not so sure that some I have met do not but love Jesus Christ? Of course doctrinally there are problems, but thank God HE transcends His own logic sometimes! I can leave it at that. But you know me, I can also go just as fast if need be into any dialogue! 😉

          I have too a pair of old Nam Jungle boots, my size 10. I wore both ours and theirs!

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          That’s how I look at it. My pet phrase is that the foot of the Cross is a junction, not a single road. Doctrinally, there are, but they got the main part, to my mind, anyway. 😉

          Never had a pair of theirs, hard to find surplus! 🙂

          Like

        • I’ve got a pair of Dan Post black cowboy boots myself. And a light leather pair of Justin’s also! I hope I am NOT just a drug-store cowboy? lol

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          My everyday day ones are Laredos, essentially replaced my Red Wing steel toe work boots, although not as good for walking. My favorite one though are my Lucchese goatskin ones, that is one comfortable boot. (And yes, Ebay, not new on them!) 🙂

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        • NEO: Indeed that “junction of the Cross” is much bigger than any of us realize I believe myself, and I am of course a neo-Calvinist (whatever that is? lol). But, into the hands of GOD we will all go, and all see Christ! 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Yessir.

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        • NEO: NIke also makes several styles of American combat boots also, both desert color and green. And yes, I have a newer pair of the Nike British desert combat boot myself, mostly for riding. I love them! But my older one’s are better for walking and “humping”! 😉

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Indeed my Red Wings (and in fact my WESCO climbing boots) were far better for walking, although Red Wing narrowed their steel toe just enough to make it uncomfortable. And the weight is of course, also ridiculous.

          Like

        • Btw NEO, I will have to re-examine the Mormon doctrine of Jesus Christ, and His Atonement especially… “For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved.” (Romans 10: 13) And calling on the Name of the Lord in great need and for salvation is not rocket science, but of course with and in repentance and faith! Is it possible to call on the Name of the Lord without dotting all our i’s and crossing all our t’s? I think of the repentant-Thief on the Cross next to Jesus! What did he know doctrinally? Not much, but he did know he was going to die, and that Jesus was somehow King of the Jews, and had a Kingdom, his heart told him that! Indeed faith born of need, change & repentance, most always makes for brokenness. And btw, it is surely possible to “know” doctrine and dogma, mentally, and not yet partake of it personally and interiorly! The depth of our sinfulness is profound! Often like Adam we are really running and hiding from God, even in the midst of our problems! Save us oh Lord!

          *This is just thinking out-loud, and of course no doctrinal or theological exaction, but thinking outside the box is sometimes necessary.

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Yep, and I think you know I agree. Best to know doctrine and obey it, but Christ and Him crucified is the key. I seem to remember the Mormons fall down on the Trinity, mostly, if I’m not blowing smoke out of my Stetson! 🙂

          Like

        • Yes, the Mormon doctrine of the Trinity is a real theological & biblical mess! They are really tritheist (tritheism)… the doctrine that the Christian Father, Son and Holy Spirit are three distinct God’s. This is of course not biblical or truly theological. And is really heretical in doctrine! But, the nature and issue should be Jesus Christ and His Lordship, His Incarnation (becoming flesh and real man), and also of course His Death on the Cross, and His Resurrection. Just how much of this doctrinal error can we allow, and still maintain Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior? In the end, I suppose we will have to let God In Christ answer this, as too so many biblical and theological mysteries! But Paul did say that the Apostolic Ministry itself was a ministry of stewardship, i.e. “stewards of the mysteries (“musterion” Greek) of God”. (1 Cor. 4: 1-2) So this is really very problematic to say the least!

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          It is, but like you, I think I’ll let God sort it out, unless asked, of course!

          Like

        • Thankfully salvation ‘In Christ’ is never a mere doctrinal litmus test, but the Love of God itself in the face of Jesus Christ! When we see HIM, will we be able to love Him, in some measure as He loved us? We will, by GOD”s Grace & Glory! And cast our crowns before him! (Rev. 4: 10-11)…. Glory, Glory be to God! 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          🙂 🙂 🙂

          Like

        • So I don’t argue with my Mormon friends, but just love them, and seek to allow us both to agree to disagree on certain things. So far it has been a blessing and a learning curve for me!

          Amen NEO, we are on the same page, and YOU have helped this old Anglican Christian “theolog” many times… Thank You! We are “Brethren”! 🙂

          Like

  2. the unit says:

    Well, Churchhill said “History is written by the victors.” So are changing perceptions changing opinions?
    And are perceptions like opinions which are like…well, you know what they say “everybody has one.” 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      In a sense, yeah, I suppose they are! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  3. the unit says:

    While we’re on history, stumbled upon something I’d never seen written about before. That is Native Indian participation in the the Civil War.
    http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/samuel-bell-maxey-born

    Like

  4. the unit says:

    Fr. Robert already expressed his encouragement. I had to look up meaning of winge as not in ole southern boy’s vocabulary.
    Well, at least you not doing hwinsian! I don’t think. 🙂
    Hang in. You’ll get a handle on it.

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      That’s what happens when you hang around with Brits! 🙂 Nope, no hwinsian, I’m pretty bad with a bow. And my dog is cheerful cuss! 🙂

      Yep, I had to Google that one! 🙂

      Maybe, but like I told Fr Robert, we’ll press on.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. the unit says:

    About depression. Left, i.e.media, Hollywood, Democrats all hoping some deplorable will do something.
    Taxi Driver.
    “Travis: Well, I know you and I ain’t talked too much, you know, but I figured you’ve been around a lot so you could…
    Wizard: Shoot. That’s why they call me the Wizard.
    Travis: I got, it’s just that I got a, I got a…
    Wizard: Things uh, things got ya down?
    Travis: Yeah.
    Wizard: Yeah, it happens to the best of us.
    Travis: Yeah, I got me a real down, real…I just wanna go out and, and you know like really, really, really do somethin’.”
    Hinkley anyone?
    Not us of course!

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      Of course not us! But there are days, aren’t there. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • the unit says:

        Yep and yep. We know better.
        That’s why they call me the Unit! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          That we do. When the last ditch comes, well… 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • the unit says:

          Well, when then comes…”What difference, at this point, does it make?” 🙂
          Travis: “…Don’t make no difference to me…”

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          🙂

          Liked by 1 person

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