Charlie Gard, Green Cards, Right to Life, and Ownership

Sometimes a story just reaches out and grabs you, and won’t let go. For me, Charlie Gard is that story. I’m convinced that eventually, the NHS will kill him, it’s not like it will be novel for them or anything. But in the meantime, I, like so many others, including the US Congress, the President of the United States, The US Right to Life movement, The British Right to Life movement, most Christians, and the Pope, one does what one can.

The biggest problem, I suspect is that the NHS when it made it the cold conclusion that this child must die, assumed that his parents were simply sheeple that would do what they were told to do. Well, they’re not, they are thinking, feeling people, who love their son, and are willing to fight all comers for what they think is right for him. They may be wrong in their assessment. They assuredly are not wrong in their determination. I and many others honor them for it.

In any case, this happened.

Does it matter that Charlie and his parents are now legal residents of the United States? Probably not really. That’s what this is, it is the coveted American Green Card, awarded by special act of the US Congress, carrying with it all the rights guaranteed an American, including the Right to Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness. It’s the right thing to do, but probably non-effectual. There is only one more thing Congress could do, declare Charlie an honorary citizen of the United States. In this context, it has been done only once, to attempt to prevent the Soviets from killing Raoul Wallenberg. He was so designated because of his work in saving tens of thousands of Jews from the Nazis in Budapest as the Swedish Special Envoy. Apparently, he was killed at the Lubyanka in 1947.

What we have here is simply a pissing match, the NHS, and the British and European courts vs the decent people of the world. The NHS will likely win the match, but they have done themselves much damage, in their cold, unblinking desire to kill this baby, no matter what anybody thinks.

For a good many American readers, I suspect they have also killed Obamacare for good, if the Congress can’t get its thumb out, then Congress will change. I think we’ve had enough, and enough of us remember Sarah Palin’s remarks on ‘Death Panels’ to recognize one when we see one. And we don’t like what we see.

The American doctor has examined Charlie, and thinks improvement may be possible, and so argued, for five hours in concert with the doctor from the Vatican’s Childrens’ Hospital. The NHS was reportedly unmoved.

Ted Noel, MD writing at American Thinker has done the best job of explaining the difference between the systems in play here.

[…]And because these medical circumstances were not rare, I helped write my hospital’s policy on Futility of Care.  But Charlie Gard’s case is different from the ones I was involved with.

When Charlie Gard entered Great Ormond Street Hospital in London, England’s single-payer health system, the National Health Service, took over.  At first, it seemed that this was a good thing, since his parents didn’t have to pay extra for his care.  But they didn’t have a choice.  They weren’t in the small minority who are either wealthy enough or favorably employed to access private insurance.  So Charlie was swallowed by the Blob.

Thus far, there didn’t seem to be any difference between single-payer and private insurance.  Both start with the same level of medical care. But shortly, the differences became manifest.  When Charlie’s rare diagnosis became clear (only 16 known cases), the NHS refused to allow any sort of alternative approach.  Charlie had struck the iceberg, and the Carpathia was nowhere to be seen.

After first contact with a doctor who might be able to help, Charlie’s parents set up a crowdfunding page and raised £1.3 million (about $1.7 million).  That’s enough for any conceivable therapy.  They had become financially able to relieve the NHS of any need to care for Charlie.  All the NHS had to do was say, “Yes.”  Instead, the NHS asserted its ownership of Charlie, and multiple courts agreed.  The hospital got court orders to discontinue life support.

What would have happened in the U.S.?  When there is no reasonable probability of returning a critically ill patient to meaningful life, the situation is to be presented to the patient’s health care surrogate.  This “Legally Authorized Person” is encouraged to recognize that further care is futile and should not be undertaken.  With the LAP’s consent, it would become possible to withdraw futile care.

It is critically important to note that the LAP (typically close family) has the authority to tell the medical staff to continue care or not.  It is not up to the doctors or the hospital.  It does not matter that continuing futile care burns out staff and consumes resources.  The family is the final authority, because the family members are the ones who own all rights in this situation.  It would be unethical to proceed without their consent, because they are protecting the patient’s natural human rights, even if they conflict with the medical prognosis.

I know that speaking in terms of “ownership” sounds strange coming from a doctor.  But this is the key fact, based in natural law.  Charlie Gard’s parents “own” him.  They begot him.  They cared for him.  And when he became ill, they cared even more for him by seeking expert assistance.  They are primarily responsible for Charlie.  But single-payer NHS changes everything.

When Charlie Gard came through that Emergency Department door, the NHS took ownership of him.  It’s a classic case of the Golden Rule: “He who has the gold makes the rules.”  (Apologies to Saint Matthew.)  In essence, the NHS said that since it is paying the freight, Charlie is now the property of the State.  His parents were involuntarily dispossessed of their son.  The NHS stole him by force of law.  Parental rights inherent in natural law were “stripped away by strangers.”

That’s all of it that I can give you (and probably more than I should, sorry Dr. Noel) but this is important stuff, so read the entire article.

You know, a long time ago, a dead white guy, a Greek, wrote an oath that supposedly doctors still abide by. His name was Hippocrates. In it, he stated that above all,

“First, do no harm”

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About NEO
Lineman, Electrician, Industrial Control technician, Staking Engineer, Inspector, Quality Assurance Manager, Chief Operations Officer

3 Responses to Charlie Gard, Green Cards, Right to Life, and Ownership

  1. the unit says:

    Didn’t Obama establish that we pay ransoms now?

    Liked by 1 person

    • the unit says:

      And then there’s minority discrimination as only having 16 with the syndrome is quite a minority.
      How about who has a propensity to have this medical condition? It’s well established and written about how some ethnic and racial groups tend to have a predilection for certain diseases and medical problems. Won’t give that discrimination a name as I don’t know that information about the minority of 16.

      Liked by 1 person

      • NEO says:

        Yep.

        Liked by 1 person

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