Zimbabwe as an Instruction Manual

My friend Brandon Christensen over at Notes on Liberty has taken to giving us presents most nights with his Nightcap series of a few good links, and they are. This is one of them.

Johnathan Pearce writing in Samizdata brings us a very good (I think) report on what is going on in South Africa. I say I think because it’s not something I know much about and need to catch up on. Here’s some of it.

South Africa decides Zimbabwe is an instruction manual, not a warning

Grim news from South Africa. Just in case anyone thought that the departure of President Zuma, a corrupt man who has stripped his country (South Africa faces severe water shortages brought on by neglect of infrastructure) might lead to better things will be disappointed. The new regime has signed off on a land-grab policy of confiscating white-owned land without compensation. (About 70 per cent of South African farmland is owned by whites.) The claim made is that any white person who owns land in the country must, by definition, have stolen it. (The idea that such ownership might have come into being without theft just does not cross certain persons’ minds. That fact is simply undiscussible.)

As we have found in the seizure/collectivisation of farms in the former Soviet Union, in China, and in Zimbabwe more recently, such moves herald mass poverty and violence. South Africa has ironically seen an influx of poor Zimbabweans since the vile Mugabe regime started to attack white farmers and seize land; the country has suffered a catastrophic decline in its farmland output, which may never recover. South Africa seems keen to follow suit; it has a range of largely self-inflicted woes: the current government is deeply corrupt. The country needs inward investment – seizing white-owned property hardly encourages any investor, of any racial background. As a matter of simple common sense, taking land by brute force, without compensation, from owners and giving it to those who are political cronies and hangers-on will inevitably reduce output and wealth, not the other way round.

There’s more, and it’s good, but what really stands out here is just how little I know about it. The other thing that is very valuable here is the comment stream. That is what really makes alternative media so much better than the dead tree press, even when it occasionally screws up and tells the truth. As of this writing, there are 88 comments on it, and all are germane either to the situation in South Africa or the wider application of what we are seeing there.

It is rare for me to run across a site where not only do I not know much about what the article is talking about but know so little that I do not think I have anything to add. This is one of those times. Do I need to say that the site is already in my reader

Enjoy, and learn.

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About NEO
Lineman, Electrician, Industrial Control technician, Staking Engineer, Inspector, Quality Assurance Manager, Chief Operations Officer

2 Responses to Zimbabwe as an Instruction Manual

  1. the unit says:

    Expropriation without so much as a bus ticket out of then Rhodesia, for just compensation, was the beginning I think.
    Don’t like the intentions or the results. Who else will eventually be keen to follow? “Round and round she goes, and where she stops nobody knows”.

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      Yeah, I know, hell of a dressing story.

      Like

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