Leaders and non-leaders

When Jessica (my former co-blogger) was here this was her traditional Palm Sunday post. In these times I think it makes a point that needs reinforcement, and it ties in so well with mine for tomorrow that I want you to read it once again. It reminds of some things that are important in our lives, and yes in the lives of our countries. Neo. From Jessica:

Thatcher for againstOne theme of this blog is the importance of leadership. Those of us who read today’s Gospel for Palm Sunday (though where I live it is more like Arctic Sunday, and we are dreaming of a white Easter) will have seen a perfect example of its absence – and the results.

Pontius Pilate was the prefect of Judea.  It wasn’t one of those top-notch jobs, and like most Romans in such posts, Pilate had two priorities: keep things quiet and make money for himself.  The Romans were pragmatists. Gods? Heck, they had hundreds of them. So it was irritating that those Jews insisted there was only one of them. What was worse is they wouldn’t bend the knee to the gods of Rome. Live and let live was Pilate’s motto. He went to Judea in about AD 26, and had been there a few years when the Jews brought Jesus to him. He couldn’t see much wrong in the fellow, and he tried to find a way of avoiding blatant injustice. He was quite willing to have the fellow flogged, but crucifying him – that was another matter.

But there, blast it, went those Jews again. They wanted the fellow crucified. Pilate didn’t want any trouble, and you can almost hear him: “Come on guys, give us a bit of wriggle room here, the guy’s basically harmless, c’mon, cut me a bit of slack.” But they wouldn’t.  On the one side the pragmatic politician looking for a way through; on the other men who knew what they wanted and would stick at nothing to get it. If you didn’t know, you’d be able to tell who was going to get their way, and you’d not put money on the first guy.

Enter Mrs. Pilate, telling him that she’s had a dream and that he should let the man be. That was all he needed, the little lady putting her oar in. Didn’t she realise he had enough trouble with those stiff-necked Jews?  Clearly not. Well, only one thing to do, wash his hands of it and let it be. And it all went off well in the end. There weren’t any riots, and although there were the strangest stories that the man had not died, it caused Pilate no problems for a bit. Politics is the art of the possible. You can see him afterward with Mrs. P: “c’mon, what do you want? I did my best. Now, what’s for supper, not more larks’ tongues?”

Small men, large events. Churchill said that in his father’s day there had been great men and small events, but during the Great War it had been the other way round. But really, we only see the real size of men when they are faced with great events. Cranmer just quoted some recently released papers from 1982 and the Falklands Crisis. Nearly every member of Mrs. Thatcher’s Cabinet was for a quiet life and giving in. We remember none of them. She was for doing what was right. We remember her.

There’s a lesson in Pilate for us all – small men never get to grips with great events – and without vision, the people perish.

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About NEO
Lineman, Electrician, Industrial Control technician, Staking Engineer, Inspector, Quality Assurance Manager, Chief Operations Officer

10 Responses to Leaders and non-leaders

  1. the unit says:

    Wriggle room eh? Reminds me of “the One” in the Medvedec conversation. And washing of hands, like i.e. Syrian red line disregarded. People perishing… and migrating.

    Liked by 1 person

    • the unit says:

      Of course, that’s what anyone would be reminded of. ???
      https://www.realclearpolitics.com/video/2017/02/20/msnbc_host_cant_remember_when_obama_promised_putin_flexibility.html

      Liked by 1 person

      • NEO says:

        That’s what drugs do, I guess. 🙂

        Pepperidge Farm remembers.

        Liked by 1 person

        • the unit says:

          heh, heh, heh, I’d forgot that one. And I read O.J. remembers. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          He’s still looking, I reckon! 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

  2. the unit says:

    Flogging or crucifying? Did Pilate really have a choice? Some Protestant denomination believes pretty much in predestination, forget which. Maybe Presbyterian. God’s plan, you know.

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      It’s a point. I think the point is that he thought he had a choice, and dithered around instead of doing the right thing.

      Liked by 1 person

      • the unit says:

        I guess it’s not a multiple choice test. Either you do or you don’t. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  3. the unit says:

    BTW, comments by Servus F. and Jessica in 2013 seem so very appropriate for our situation in the ‘Art of the Deal’ today. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      They are and that helped me decide to bring it along.

      Liked by 1 person

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