Cultural Workers, Unite!

Last Saturday was, if you missed it, the 200th anniversary of Karl Marx’s birthday. Yay! Still, the old idiot has had a lot of influence, and those that presumably believed his nonsense have caused the death (often intentionally) of over a hundred million people in the last 100 years. The American Spectator had something to say about it, him, and cultural Marxism.

It’s often charged among the political right that America is going communist, or at least socialist, or toward some form of Marxism. My concern is less classical Marxism than culturalMarxism, a strain of communist thought that even most of those engaging in it aren’t consciously aware of. If you Google “cultural Marxism,” the first thing that pops up is a Wikipedia definition dismissing it as a “conspiracy theory which sees the Frankfurt School as part of an ongoing movement to take over and destroy Western culture.”

Conspiracy Theory?

Well, that merely affirms the point. The vast majority of those advancing cultural Marxism aren’t even aware they’re doing so. Tell them and they’ll either blankly stare or mockingly laugh at you as a conspiracy monger.

In truth, cultural Marxism not only exists, but exists as the dominant form of Marxism in America and much of the West today.

A quite obvious point to clear-eyed thinkers, like you and me. But its one often overlooked, and sometimes, I think, both maliciously and intentionally.

The communist movement has always needed liberals as props to enlist at rallies. Rarely could CPUSA ever have filled Central Park with its own members. Bachtell’s buddies today might not fill a sandbox at a Manhattan playground.

The reason for that is good news: The original ambition of an economic/class-based revolution has failed. And so, instead, today’s Marxists — including those in CPUSA, once the home of classical Marxism — have gone cultural.

It’s a form of Marxism so radical in its redefinition of human nature that Marx himself would blush and find it bewildering. As I write, the lead article at CPUSA’s website is titled, “The Capitalist Culture of Male Supremacy and Misogyny” — a piece breathtaking in its cultural radicalism. And it personifies the communist movement’s thrust today.

These are not the communists our father’s dealt with!

So, what is this cultural Marxism, and how did it emerge?

It began not on May 5, 1818, with Marx’s birth, but over a hundred years later with the birth of what came to be known as the Frankfurt School.

These 1920s and 1930s German Marxists were Freudian-Marxists. For them, orthodox/classical Marxism was too limiting, too narrow, too controlled by the Soviet Comintern that strong-armed national communist parties. This rigidity prevented these more freewheeling neo-Marxists from initiating the cultural transformation they craved, including revolutionary changes in marriage, sexuality, and family. These Frankfurt-based theorists were left-wing intellectuals who looked to the universities as the home base from which their ideas could be launched. They spurned the church and looked to Marx and Freud as the gods who they believed would not fail. Rather than organize the workers and factories, the peasants and fields and farms, they would organize the students and the academy, the artists and the media and the film industry.

Sound familiar? Yeah, me too. Take almost every problem we have in the US, or Western Europe, and they will trace back to that paragraph. Not so much a conspiracy as a group thinking mind at work training our so-called elites, that have no real title to the claim, except that they were mal-educated at institutions that were formerly world-class, but had been subverted into indoctrination centers, and little else.

The threat of Hitler’s Germany drove the Frankfurt School out of Europe and into the welcoming arms of America’s left-wing colleges. Most to all of the leading practitioners were Jews who needed a safe haven. So, they and their Institute came to New York City, specifically to the campus of Columbia University, already a hotbed of communism.

Pleading the case for them at Columbia was John Dewey, founding father of American public education, progressive fool, and communist sympathizer. Thus, their primary area of operation would be the educational system — the schools, the universities, and particularly the teachers’ colleges. It was no coincidence that Columbia housed the nation’s top teachers’ college — a creation of John Dewey.

From there, the cultural Marxists spread their ideas to campuses nationwide. Their insane notions would sweep up the ’60s New Left, to which the likes of Herbert Marcuse became an ideological guru to the radicals who today are tenured at our universities.

Never as completely as they wished, but amazingly complete. Here is the root of all our social evils.

Not to be forgotten in all of this was a critical figure, a non-German. At the age of 35, in 1926, Antonio Gramsci was arrested in his native Italy by Mussolini (the only half-sensible thing Il Duce ever did), and spent the last 11 years of his life in prison. Samuel Gregg callsGramsci perhaps “the most dangerous socialist in history.”

Whereas Marx and his original followers were all about class economics, seeing wealth redistribution and the seizure of the means of production as the key to their vision, Gramsci looked to culture. If the Left truly wanted to win, it needed to first seize the “cultural means of production”: culture-forming institutions such as the media and universities and even churches.

Not until leftists came to dominate these institutions would they be able to convince enough people to support their Marxist revolution. “This part of his thesis was like manna from heaven for many left-wing Western intellectuals,” writes Sam Gregg. “Instead of joining a factory collective or making bombs in basements, a leftist professor could help free society from capitalist exploitation by penning essays in his office or teaching students.”

There’s lots more in Professor Kengor’s article at the link (above), which you should read. I’ve stuck mostly to the roots and left the growth alone, because if you don’t understand where it came from, well you won’t understand how it spread. It’s like knowing that Kudzu had no natural enemies in the southern United States, and thus turned from an effective means of stabilizing soil to a horribly invasive weed.

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About NEO
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25 Responses to Cultural Workers, Unite!

  1. the unit says:

    Offshoot comment here. I’ve been fighting to control Kudzu for several years now. I don’t think you can kill it without killing everything else. Even then, I think it’d grow back.
    My guess it got here mixed in with some horse grain and spread about my place by their “road apples”.
    I’m certain it’s going to be here long after I’m gone.
    Cultural horseshit. Similar to cultural Marxism. And that’s no BS. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Scoop says:

      Kudzu was introduced from Japan into the United States at the Japanese pavilion in the 1876 Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia.[19] In the 1930s and 1940s, the vine was rebranded as a way for farmers to stop soil erosion. Workers were paid $8 per acre to sow topsoil with the invasive vine. The cultivation covered over one million acres of kudzu.

      Another brilliant government program that has cost us many man hours and copious amounts of money to rid our country of this cancerous vegetation; and it seems unstoppable at this point . . . same as cultural Marxism.

      Liked by 1 person

      • the unit says:

        Yep, you got to the point, as I was insidiously implying. 🙂

        Liked by 2 people

        • NEO says:

          I try! 😉

          Liked by 2 people

      • the unit says:

        I guess it more cultivationally agrarian HS, than cultural. 🙂

        Liked by 2 people

        • NEO says:

          Yeah, rather. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • Scoop says:

          There may have a been a bit of both types of HS at play here 🙂

          Liked by 2 people

      • the unit says:

        Maybe HS still means nonsense in the NWO. 🙂

        Liked by 2 people

        • Scoop says:

          Its HS of a different color. But then, its still HS. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

  2. Scoop says:

    One of my friends in college, Mike Harari, was the son of Hannaniah Harari, a rather great American painter (there is much on him on the internet). He started out as a communist opposing fascism and eventually seeing the light, left that in the past . . . after having helped spread this menace through our schools and in the publications that he illustrated and drew political cartoons etc. His son ended poorly as drugs took their toll on his mental faculties and he became catatonic to some extent (sadly, he was visiting me at my apartment when he slipped into this mental state . . . a sad thing to watch). His father toward the end of his life blamed the radical left teachers for much of the culture that ruined his son.

    That is simply one man I know about. I wonder how many others sowed those seeds which we are now battling. It is almost better to steer clear of Universities these days and boycott all Hollywood films if you are to have any kind of normalcy in your life.

    Liked by 2 people

    • NEO says:

      No personal stories from me, but yeah, I think you’re right. No good can come from dealing with them – other, perhaps, than trying to help them see reality.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Scoop says:

        Its difficult when we have entrusted their education to believers in these ideologies. They are the experts as far as our kids understand it. Hard to undo that.

        Liked by 2 people

        • NEO says:

          It is, but also critical to do so/

          Liked by 2 people

        • Scoop says:

          Well I have found it exceedingly difficult to converse with the airhead population robbed of their grey matter by the brain eating beetles that infest our schools. No wonder the zombie movies and the walking dead movies are so popular; they look and act just like our college grads. They can relate to them.

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          fair amount of truth there, in my experience. The answer may be to catch them young, when they are just starting to read, and make sure they get some real stuff to read.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Scoop says:

          Only way I know as well. Home schooling is the best option going.

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Yep.

          Liked by 1 person

  3. the unit says:

    Archie sends his greetings for the day. Still confined while spring bird eggs hatch.
    Thank goodness I don’t have to stay in all day with him. 🙂
    Next door cultural teenage basement dweller shot me the bird today. Well, not basement exactly in Florida, but you get my point.
    Mowed my three acres with the northwind blowing, probably last fairly gusty of the Spring. Anyway ground-level fallen oak pollen gets picked up and flies in mowing. His folks pool south of me. Thus the cultural teenage basement dweller finger, as the blowing pollen covered his cultural teenage basement dweller’s folks swimming pool. 🙂
    I can laugh at the cultural teenage basement dweller ’cause earlier in the morning I cut the area north of our own pool, so, yeah, I even gave myself the finger. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • the unit says:

      Oh, I forgot the cultural human nature point…”Jefferson still lives.” 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      Yeah, back in the day, dad wasn’t amused by my hay fever, when he had to mow the five acres, and clean the pool! But I was about 14 at the time. Good times! 🙂

      Teenage is a good time to be resentful about all sorts of piddly stuff, then the real world shows up, well cor some of us! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • the unit says:

        He was just envious of the pool party I had last weekend. “Good times”. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Probably so! 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • the unit says:

          All that CPR training I’ve had came in handy. Pool side, I was left gasping for breath at the spectacle and just in case I was needed to help make whoopee. Exuberant celebration only, of course. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Of course! 🙂

          Like

  4. Reblogged this on Boudica2015.

    Like

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