Seriously, but not Literally

This could be a book review, except all I’ve read is the Amazon excerpt, which was enough to sell me the book, which I’ll likely read today – it’s that good. What book is that? This one: The Great Revolt: Inside the Populist Coalition Reshaping American Politics, by Salena Zito and Brad Todd, Crown Forum, New York.

Thing is, I’m one of the people she’s writing about (no, not personally) but their background is my background, it is our shared history – in the breadbasket and manufactury of America. We are the people who elected Trump. Why? Because we had simply had enough of what many, likely most, of us see as the uniparty.

Time for something new. And Trump speaks our language, blunt, to the point, always looking out for America First. It was Zito that first described so well how we take Trump, then and now: We take him seriously, but not literally. That’s also how we take each other. How a Brooklyn born, Manhatten based multi-millionaire builder/CEO manages to sound like us is remarkable, but he does, and on 20 January 2017, a president of the old America took office. After all, he is the President of the United States, not the freakin’ world.

Fred Siegal of City Journal has a good review of the book up there, here is an excerpt from that.

Despite Trump’s narrow margin of victory—just 77,000 votes—in Pennsylvania, Michigan, and Wisconsin, Zito and Todd see the 2016 election as representing a tectonic shift in America’s electoral plates. “Far from a fluke, the 2016 election was a product of Obama’s globalist conceits that produced defective trade deals, open borders and an aggressive secularism.” Trump’s victory was his triumph, not the Republican Party’s.  Neither the two-time Obama voters who switched to Trump nor the habitual nonvoters who came out to the polls in 2016 saw much to rally around in the GOP. Their ties are to Trump, a finding with implications for the upcoming midterms.

“Eighty-nine percent of Trump voters represented in the Great Revolt Survey agree with the statement ‘Republicans and Democrats in Washington are both guilty of leading the country down the wrong path,’” Zito and Todd write. An Iowa voter insisted that the “only person that is able to turn me against Trump is Trump.” Similarly, in economically hard-hit Ashtabula, Ohio, east of Cleveland, a voter said: “So to ask me what would extricate me from Trump would be like asking me to remove me from myself, from my family, and from my community.” The most important issues for voters in the authors’ survey were “restoring manufacturing jobs, protecting Medicare and social security and appointing conservatives to the Supreme Court to protect religious liberty being threatened by assertive Hilary Clinton Progressives.” One interviewee said that NAFTA, the North American Free Trade Agreement, “is no longer an acronym—it’s a noun, and a profanity.”

It’s interesting that as this goes on, not to mention the hysterical bleating from the Democrats and the Never-Trumpers (in whom I fail to discern any difference) the president’s support from Hispanics and Blacks is starting to rise, not surprisingly, a rising tide really does lift all boats, and their lives are getting better. Even most of the Republican party seems to be starting to see the light, not least because it’s fairly easy to primary a candidate, even to the Senate level, especially with a popular president providing the tar and feathers.

Zito and Tod see American politics as a tectonic process, huge groups crashing into each other and changing. They have at least a fair amount of right. The morphing of the Whigs and others into the nascent Republican party in the 1850s was one. Don’t forget they fielded their first candidate for president in 1856, Lincoln was only the second. The Democratic Party’s switch to Progressivism in Wilson’s term, soon followed by Roosevelt paved the way for the welfare state.

This may well be the next, as the center of America, the people (and their sons and daughters, and grandsons and granddaughters) who fight America’s wars, build and fix America’s machines, and feed the world, once again bring their common sense, reality-based outlook to the governance of the country.

I don’t think it will end with Trump, either, there is an optimism in the air. And when the most open and largest market in the world starts flexing its muscles, the world will change, and not for the better for snowflakes and bureaucrats anywhere in the world. Have I mentioned that the Atlanta Federal Reserve is predicting an annual growth rate of 4.7% in this quarter? We’ve only just begun.

There’s an old Negro spiritual that says it well:

Get on Board, little chillun’, Get on board.

 

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About NEO
Lineman, Electrician, Industrial Control technician, Staking Engineer, Inspector, Quality Assurance Manager, Chief Operations Officer

6 Responses to Seriously, but not Literally

  1. the unit says:

    Yep, people could see it coming this time. Been side-tracked too many times before. 🙂
    https://qph.fs.quoracdn.net/main-qimg-331ae879327adb028f1a12efdf81af09.webp

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      In a rather small nutshell, Yep. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • the unit says:

        Like this better. 🙂
        https://qph.fs.quoracdn.net/main-qimg-20bc834e6d253b03cc8e7c2d084ae2db.webp

        Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          That is gorgeous! 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • the unit says:

          Was the last train, but we on it! 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Yep, we be. 🙂

          Like

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