Remembering

Via Secondcitycop,

  • Archivists who bought a stash of CDs at a house clearance sale found 2,400 photos of Ground Zero in New York taken following the 9/11 attacks in 2001.

    They appear to have been taken by an as yet unidentified construction worker who helped to clear up the wreckage of the World Trade Center towers and surrounding area.

    The CDs were in poor condition but the data was ultimately retrievable.

As SCC says, not the best pictures in the world, rather like the ones I have taken on jobsites through the years when I wanted to remember. And that is the point.
Still hard to look at as it is hard to remember that day, but we always will.

About NEO
Lineman, Electrician, Industrial Control technician, Staking Engineer, Inspector, Quality Assurance Manager, Chief Operations Officer

43 Responses to Remembering

  1. Scoop says:

    Sad but inspiring at the same time. After the evil, good emerges to begin rebuilding.

    I can’t help but think that these pictures are a metaphor for the destruction and collapse of our Western Christian Civilization and the total collapse of morality in this world. I only hope that the first responders and laborers who cleaned up the mess are also a metaphor for the restoration of moral sanity. From the ashes of corruption and chaos comes a reestablishment of order, sanity and moral compass. I hope it lasts in the collective conscience of the culture longer than the resurgence of patriotism and positive values did after 9/11. From my viewpoint we got about 2 years of unity before we found ourselves back in the divided and chaotic schism from the ideals that made the US the leader of the world . . . and I pray we won’t have to suffer a greater tragedy to focus our attention on the fact that the inmates are running the asylum. Trump helps, but he can’t do it by himself.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Nicholas says:

      I am in agreement there. Unfortunately for us, we are further down the road of corruption. We we ruled by Blair during that time – and you know what I think about him. I take it you have heard of the Justice in the Court of Protection ordering a woman to have an abortion? I hope the Judicial Appointments Committee gets wind of this and takes action – but I doubt it.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Scoop says:

        Yes. It was absolutely evil. What a stain on the state of humanity in our times.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Nicholas says:

          I am considering whether it is possible to bring a judicial review claim in the High Court, but I personal am unlikely to have locus standi to bring a claim. I should like the Catholic Bishops Conference of England and Wales to do it, but I doubt they will.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Scoop says:

          Yeah, good luck with that with the corruption and deterioration of the bishops and conferences in our countries. Hopefully, God will raise up a saint to rally the troops of his foot soldiers to overturn this anarchy that is enveloping our cultures.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Nicholas says:

          Ah, apparently it has been overturned in an emergency appeal to the Court of Appeal. Thank God.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Scoop says:

          That is good news.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Nicholas says:

          Of course, it doesn’t change the fact that the original judge still made that order – and Caroline Farrow suspects it may not be the first time such orders have been made. The judiciary looks in need of reform. I personally believe our judges should be elected, not appointed, They should be directly accountable to the people.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Scoop says:

          I think the original idea was good. Appointments made by good men would work well and we all need a final judge for our laws. Our supreme court has also become corrupt with ideological drives rather than moral justice as their guides. They have become political. We won’t get rid of that even if elected by the people . . . it would be just like electing a president or a congressman representing a political party.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Nicholas says:

          I agree in theory with the principle of appointment in order to safeguard impartiality. But both the USA and UK have a problem: they are common law systems: judges do not merely interpret law; they make it. Indeed, our two systems influence each other: in the 19th century the USA was influenced by English case law: example: the rule on remoteness in contract as handed down in Hadley v Baxendale. I think it necessary for the people to have means of redressing the situation.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Scoop says:

          Our Congress makes law. Our Supreme Court interprets it. But that has become corrupt with lower courts are seen to legislate from the bench which is not their role. So it is a mess that needs some Spring cleaning I think.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Nicholas says:

          Indeed. Our system is rather confused. In a proper separation of powers, judges would not make law – but in both our countries they do. Tort is a product of the courts, not the legislature, as is contract law. In the UK, the matter is worse, because the concept of the supremacy of Parliament is a product of case law, and so can be changed by the courts – this was said in R (on the application of Jackson) v Attorney General.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Scoop says:

          Sounds like there is a lot of work to be done and it also seems probable that this will not be resolved easily if at all.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Nicholas says:

          Indeed. The UK is in need of serious constitutional reform. I am wondering whether the SCOTUS will be able to reverse Roe v Wade in the next few years also. State sanctioned murder is a disgrace.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Scoop says:

          It certainly is. Popular sentiment at this point in our history seems to answer that its reversal should be possible. However, I don’t think that could be done by the courts and their bad decisioned precedents; it would have to come from a referendum of the people. Even then, state law would, I should think, take over and some states would give us their own laws. But as far as codifying it for the country without the freedom on states rights might be more than we can ever wish for. We need a revival of morality within the entire culture so that there is agreement everywhere that murder is forbidden; and abortion should be classified as that sense it makes no logical sense that it could be anything other than that.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Nicholas says:

          Indeed, and I grow weary of indulging the pleadings of people who wish to argue for it. It’s one thing to temporarily suppose something for the sake of argument, but their requests are beyond that.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Scoop says:

          It reminds me of a pagan death cult. You may as well be a pagan culture sacrificing children to Moloch to gain his favor . . . only it now is to gain the votes of naive women, extreme feminists and those who are pushing a gospel of overcrowding and carbon footprints etc. Mostly it is driven ideologically by using the old method of having your cake and eating it too.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Nicholas says:

          There is no way it can be justified. The rage you see in some of the protestors makes me think of Psalm 2, the Gentiles and their Kings raging against the LORD and His Anointed.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Scoop says:

          It’s the anti-religion, replete with their own sacraments; killing babies, deciding your own gender, special treatment for those who are victims (and the list is long and growing longer everyday . . . with college students with debt be latest). Everything is upside down but they offer every victim a political solution: let the state take care of you . . . and even pay for your abortion, your sex change and your tuition . . . if you vote for satan. “You will not die” says the serpent.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Nicholas says:

          Truly disturbing. If we do not slay this serpent, it will devour us all. Society is so divided now: were it not for the workplace, we would all be in our little camps.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Scoop says:

          We are already in our little camps. We only tolerate each other for the sake of peace and the fear of violence.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Nicholas says:

          That is true – society is in for a shock when government is handed over to the saints.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Scoop says:

          To me the Jewish story of Adam and Eve was written to express in terms they understood objective Truth. Laws (the fruit of the Tree of Good and Evil) are to received rather than produced by our own lights according to our personal sense of justice . . . otherwise it only becomes subjective beneficial to the individual himself. The true law (the well-formed conscience) has been given to all men in their hears (known as natural law). In the beginning it was preternatural and men lived by it. But once one decides for himself what is good and evil it becomes despoiled.

          Therefore, after the fall, we are now ejected from paradise and unable to eat from the tree of life by our own desire. It must be received just as the law was to be received. We have both jettisoned the law given and the life given to man to pursue our own path to a man made reality that is far from the natural path outlined by God. Catholics used to say, quite rightly, “I do not TAKE communion at Mass but I RECEIVE communion” . . . a gift of God. There is need for sorrow for our faults and shortcomings and then God freely gives to us that which we desire: the fruit of the Tree of Life.

          Thus original sin is true and one need not look far to see how far off we have drifted from the Law set in our hearts. Thank God that He became man to atone for our foolishness and restore us to spiritual health or at least restore a path for us to regain our proper path. Not sure how I could explain this to those over at AATW who almost seem angry at Christianity for all the unhappiness it causes. We are only unhappy because we don’t get to be the center of our universe anymore. Once you accept Christ as the center of our life then the yoke is easy and people can abide by Divine Law whilst retaining their joy and happiness with the abundance of Good that He has provided us.

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Roe may well be reversed one of these days. It was a technically bad decision, there are a few others but if they are all cleared it will go back to the states (which is where it belongs) some will do an Alabama at that point, but sadly, some will do an Illinois. An improvement, to be sure, but minds need to be worked on.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Scoop says:

          I disagree with the idea that it belongs in the states though it is preferable to what we have now. It all comes down to definitions. Is the baby in the woman a ‘person’ with Constitutional rights? If it is defined as such then no state has the right to over-ride the rights given the individual within the Constitutional framework. That, of course, would be the best outcome we can hope for. As an interim, I will gladly let it go back to the states until we come to grips with the ultimate moral argument of the rights of the baby.

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          I agree with you, and often use that argument. But about half the population seemingly doesn’t so we’re not likely to see it as such any time soon. That doesn’t ,ale it OK, but better than now. I hate politics sometimes! 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • Scoop says:

          Me too! 🙂

          Like

        • NEO says:

          🙂

          Like

        • NEO says:

          Too much worrying about the dignity of the court, looks like to me.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Scoop says:

          Probably right.

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          My experience is, if Caroline says it, take it to the bank. An excellent guide.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Nicholas says:

          Yes, I like her.

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          I do as well. First ran across her when the Watchtower went private and then followed her lead on Alfie. A brave and good lady.

          Liked by 1 person

      • NEO says:

        It’s been overruled on appeal last I read last night. Should have never gotten that far, or course.

        Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      Yep, gonna take at least most of us. A worthwhile way to spend our lives though.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. the unit says:

    I only looked at a few. I can remember sufficiently without viewing it all again.
    Big deal over a drone. Shoulda leveled the whole place afterwards, instead of flying them out of our country. (Yep, conspiracy theory stuff, like was it Bldg. 7?)
    P.S. pictures remind you of job sites you want to remember? 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      I ran a few that beta tested new control systems and such. That was a lot of fun. (It really was, I had engineers from all over what we called the free world, listening to me when I told them they were full of it, we’d do it like this, and it worked! 🙂

      Yeah, on the rest, I know, I looked at the first page, brought back memories I don’t need but I’m glad it’s there.

      Liked by 1 person

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