A Committee of the Whole

Oil on canvas painting of Richard Henry Lee. Photo credit: Wikipedia

Something different this week. I’m a bit tired of the Stürm und Drang of politics, especially in Washington and London. I also suspect that they’ll still be going at it when we return, soap operas are like that. And besides it’s the Fourth of July week, and nothing they’re going to do in the next few days is anywhere near as important as what the Second Continental Congress did this week 243 years ago. Most of these posts are from 2012 when this blog was less than a year old, and I’m making minimal changes to them, and most of you are new here, and they are just as valid as they were then. Hope you enjoy them.

Let us take note that today there is a document in the committee of the whole of Congress, for editing. It was written by Mr. Jefferson of Virginia, pursuant to a resolution offered by Virginia Delegate Richard Henry Lee and seconded by John Adams of Massachusetts.

“Resolved, that these United Colonies are, and of right ought to be, free and independent States, that they are absolved from all allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain is, and ought to be, totally dissolved.”

We would be wise to note that this resolution was passed with heavy hearts, not from fear, but from long affection for our cousins in the United Kingdom.

Believe me, dear Sir: there is not in the British empire a man who more cordially loves a union with Great Britain than I do. But, by the God that made me, I will cease to exist before I yield to a connection on such terms as the British Parliament propose; and in this, I think I speak the sentiments of America.

—Thomas Jefferson, November 29, 1775

So it would be. It is the same conflict that led to Magna Charta, and to the Glorious Revolution. This time carried out in a war that would change the world. In fact, many of us refer to it as the Second English Civil War, for such it was.

We probably won’t take the time later this week so let’s note now that the ensuing unpleasantness would lead to one of the largest mass emigrations the United States would ever see, that of many Loyalists to Canada. They imparted to the Canucks some measure of understanding us without taking our world famous rowdiness with them. God Bless them.

They like the United Kingdom itself would in time become the friends that prove Bismarck’s dictum true, “Great Nations do not have friends, they have interests”. This nation does.

And we noted a few days ago the 3d anniversary of the United Kingdoms own Independence Day. the British finding, as we did, that the major obstacle to freedom, is Parliament. They too will win through, I think.

A film clip perhaps, showing Hollywood’s version of the difference between Americans and Canadians.

And so as we begin the celebration of independence this week, we would be wise to remember that while we have the oldest government in the world, we are amongst the youngest of countries. But we had a head start, for we built this country on the shoulders of giants.

About NEO
Lineman, Electrician, Industrial Control technician, Staking Engineer, Inspector, Quality Assurance Manager, Chief Operations Officer

24 Responses to A Committee of the Whole

  1. Nicholas says:

    Ideals to live by: hard work, enjoy the fruit of your own labour, the government can poke off. Some wise principles to remember, even in times of tyranny. When a man becomes servile in his very soul, that is the beginning of the end. “Christ, not man, is King.”

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Nicholas says:

    It seems to me that the Anglo nations are having an identity crisis (for which a return to the fathers may be part of the cure). We are being challenged ethnically, religiously, culturally, economically, and historically.

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      Yep. They are trying to force a ‘Year 0’ on us. But Anglo-Saxons are a very stubborn bunch, we may just make it.

      I read that New Zealanders, like Nutmeggers, aren’t very cooperative with the gun grabbers. Good on them.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Nicholas says:

        Thank God they are: at times, I wish we had not given in. It seems we have just replaced one vice with another: if not guns, then knives; if not knives, then clubs; etc. Gangs, etc have taken over the cities. If you ask a number of Brits in private, away from the snitches, they will say that they feel like foreigners in their own land.

        Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          I know many, who say it openly, especially with regard to Londonistan, but other cities as well.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Nicholas says:

          Pretty much every major city in England and Wales it seems – not sure about Scotland and NI. The unitary nature of our constitution has also been destroyed by devolution. Knowing Jess’ Welsh blood, I would not have argued the issue with her, but I find it an evil attack on what made us great. The glory of the United Kingdom’s golden age was just that: its unity, which made us strong to police the seas and lands.

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          I might have, carefully. 🙂 Your point is valid, either you need to have one parliament, or you need an English parliament under Westminster, but the UK isn’t physically all that big that it needs four or five legislature, one should do, especially one that is considerably larger than the US Congress.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Nicholas says:

          Plus liberalism tends to hold sway in Wales and Scotland, which gives it a backdoor into the country. My concern is primarily with them using English taxpayers’ money to fund things of which the English do not derive benefit. The Scottish university issue particularly offended the English. Did you ever discuss that with Jess or Chalcedon?

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          No, by the time I was aware of it, Jess was gone, soon followed by C. I would be interested to know his thoughts on it. He’s pretty solid.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Nicholas says:

          Alas, the problem with the finance side of these issues is getting hold of the relevant public accounts. There are further points to consider in arguments over this issue:

          A) Are taxes raised locally in Scotland sufficient to cover this programme?

          B) If they are sufficient, would they also be sufficient to cover English students if the Scots changed policy and allowed them to benefit from it?

          C) Even if they are sufficient in theory, are they actually in practice if other benefits from English taxpayers’ money are taken into account? At what points do we set the boundaries of funding to make the scheme possible?

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Frankly the best solution would be an UK wide law ending all of them along with all student loans by the government. I’d bet tuition would come down pretty quickly. Same in the US, of course. We haven’t been funding education for a long time, we’re funding useless administration.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Nicholas says:

          I completely agree: and it causes the same problems as money created out of nothing by banks for the purposes of personal and busines loans and mortgages.

          Liked by 1 person

  3. Nicholas says:

    I would have said that the Canadians tend to get us Brits more than the Americans do (not as an insult, just a simple observation), but I think that is less true today since the character of Canada has changed.

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      I’ve often said that they are half of each of us, with a bit of Frog. Same thing really.

      But yes, I think the UK have become more like us. That sentence was considered this morning, you really have found an enemy in Parliament, just as we did. As I said at the time, “Welcome to the Revolution, Mummy”. It’s something the Canadians have never faced, maybe because they remain docile loyalists.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Nicholas says:

        The Canadians are under threat from immigration and political correctness. Their “niceness” has been used against them, as has that of the English. Realising what democracy is in the hands of our enemy, combined with my reading about how dhimmitude all but destroyed Christianity in the Middle East, I came to embrace the American Constitutional ideal.

        Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          There is a reason why America, from the founding fathers on, has always been very wary of democracy, and held it at arm’s length. We still often refer to it as Mobocracy. The people need a voice, but it must be held at a remove.

          The thing that always surprises me,in dealing with the British (mostly English) is the blind worship of Democracy, which has almost always proved fatal to freedom.

          Liked by 1 person

  4. the unit says:

    I can tell from his hair style he’d have endorsed the new Nike shoes. 🙂
    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D-eFDcnWsAIO_x3.jpg:large

    Liked by 1 person

    • NEO says:

      Bet the farm on that! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • the unit says:

        One of us, Nike or me is pushing our luck. I will not, and won’t, buy no more.
        Another one of those can you remember when it happened?
        Yep, December of ’92 I bought a pair. Something private for my memory.
        Anyway, they squeeked with every step I took. Bought no more and they were the only ones I ever purchased.
        We’ve talked boots before. I’ll stick with my Georgia Boot Wellingtons for comfort in old age. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Yep, I simply won’t pay the price for shoes that I rarely wear. I’ve got a pair adequate for my use, actually a pair of sperry boat shoes (tennies essentially) that I paid less than $5 for down at the resale shop, 🙂

          Georgia’s Wellingtons are damned fine boots. Had a couple of pairs myself, pretty heavy though. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • the unit says:

          Yeah, some new boots are advertising light weight and tough. But I want my feet on solid, not false foundation and the rest here too…

          Yep, I linked this before. Well, I like it. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • NEO says:

          Nothing wrong with that! 🙂

          Like

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