Sensible

Awhile back I wrote a little something; it was during the Great Toilet Paper Shortage of 2020, and I mentioned that ‘doomsday preppers’ didn’t look so crazy after all. While I now have enough toilet paper for four families, I still check in with the prepper community just to keep abreast of new tips and techniques. I came across this very intelligent, very rational gentleman and I was impressed with his information.

The point he makes and that I can relate to is plain, old weather emergencies. The midwest has its tornadoes and the west coast has massive rains and or fires, and the east coast can get nor’easters and hurricanes. Here in Florida, hurricanes are our biggest concern. My particular area of Florida, St. Petersburg, has been relatively untouched by major hurricanes, thankfully, but our John’s Pass on St. Pete Beach, was created by a big hurricane in the 1920s, so we’re wise to keep an eye on the weather from June until the end of November because you never know when a ‘tropical storm’ will change its mind and become a humdinger of a hurricane. After you’ve lived here for a while, and get over the initial panic of your first couple of hurricanes, you settle down to a type of preparedness that seems, on the surface, to be adequate for most situations. But remember Homestead Florida and hurricane Andrew that very nearly wiped out an entire town. Remember hurricane Michael that was so destructive to Texas. It would take more than a few batteries and a food cooler to handle a really severe hurricane. Additionally, hurricanes can spawn tornadoes so there’s a possibility of a double whammy.

The electric service in St. Pete is set up in a grid system and for some reason known only to God, our neighborhood is the first one they shut down when it looks like a hurricane is on its way to St. Pete – like hurricane Charley that was looking really mean with our name on it; fortunately, he took a severe turn in trajectory and bypassed us altogether. But it could have been a direct hit. Because of the grid system, we were out of electricity for four days. Since then, I’ve stocked up a little bit – I have a ‘power tower’ that will run my fridge and recharge my tablet and cell phone for about seven days constant use. I will get a radio (it’s on my list) that has three sources of recharge/charge – ac/dc, battery, and solar. We have a gas stove/oven with electronic ignition but it can be fired up using a match or a lighter so we can cook.

I keep promising myself I’ll get some ‘prepper’ food – there are several companies that offer foodstuffs that will last (remain edible ) 25 years. But it’s expensive and I’m cheap. I’m going to do more research on that but in the meantime, buying extra canned goods is a good way to go except I don’t have much storage space. I suspect, however, that I could stash a goodly amount of canned goods in the laundry room, under the counters where I craft and fold laundry; out of the way but handy to get to. There are a few other things I have in mind and I may, at some point in the future, come back to this topic with updates.

The other situation that is in the back of any sane person’s mind is possible civil unrest. This is a new chapter in America and it’s got lots of folks considering the same things I’m considering. A pound of prevention is worth an ounce of cure and I’d rather operate from strength than weakness. I’m looking at those options, as well. Some might consider that thought as extreme or irrational – I’ll bet folks in Portland thought so, too. If you keep your eyes and ears open, it’s not difficult to sit back and look at your home town and decide for yourself how much prep you need to do for you and your family. I don’t think that’s irrational at all. Before you take your vehicle on a long trip, don’t you take it to your service station and have them check out the vehicle – if only for your own peace of mind? Sure you do; it’s the wise and rational thing to do. And so is some preparation for those things that are not foreseeable.

34 Responses to Sensible

  1. Nicholas says:

    In the UK flooding is a serious concern, particularly in places like the Somerset Levels. That can affect house prices and your ability to obtain insurance.

    As for being prepared, we have a tin cupboard, which we restock more or less whenever we use something. As to observe, though, even tinned goods don’t last forever, so it’s worth doing a check every soften, especially of ones at the back of your shelf.

    Liked by 2 people

    • audremyers says:

      I’ve seen some videos of the kind of flooding in that Somerset Levels area and it’s frightening, for sure! And you’re absolutely correct – rotating what you have in storage is important. Newest in back, oldest in front. Just makes sense.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Nicholas says:

        I hope it doesn’t come to that, but I reckon things will get pretty bumpy in the USA for a while. I don’t see these BLM protests going away, and I think things like that will easily be sparked if someone on the far right loses it and kills someone. Every time the Left clamps down on normal/traditional views, there’s always someone on the edge who can’t take it anymore and commits some atrocity. One only has to consider Anders Breivik’s comment that he felt no one in the establishment was listening.

        Liked by 2 people

    • Alys Williams says:

      I have always kept a good store cupboard more out of habit than of necessity. You do need to check dates on things from time to time though including on dried goods but if things are stored correctly they will keep well past the best before date. I recently unearthed a tin of lentils that was two years out of date. They were perfectly fine when I opened them so I ate them and an still here to tell the tale. I have never been affected by flooding fortunately but it must be horrible to deal with.

      Liked by 3 people

      • audremyers says:

        Rotation is the key. But I wouldn’t be worried about dried lentils or dried peas or any of the dried goods as long as they’re stored so moisture can’t get to them.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Alys Williams says:

    Get yourself sorted Audre. What would you heat food on? Perhaps a small burner that runs off cannisters of gas would be a good standby.

    Liked by 2 people

    • audremyers says:

      As I mentioned, we have a gas stove/oven so even if the electric ignition didn’t work, we can still light it with a match. Our gas pipes are underground and not really subject to being affected by weather.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Alys Williams says:

        Of course. Same here. Silly Alys.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Nicholas says:

        You can also use traditional preservation methods, which might be more cost-effective than prepper products, but I’d have to check and it would be relative to your goals. There’s pickling, dehydrating, making pemican, making hard tack. It’s also worth researching treatment of polluted water with alcohol where boiling is not an option.

        Liked by 2 people

  3. audremyers says:

    Nicholas – not to mention instant gratification as opposed to having to wait for it.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. audremyers says:

    Scoop – There’s no denying the direction in which we are headed. Ears to the ground and watching the occasional unexpected video and its source, often reveal counter measures. You are incredibly savvy – like our Neo – so you know what I’m talking about.

    Rome wasn’t built in a day; America hasn’t been on the cusp of socialism just since 2020 – what’s it called: a slow march? But America, believe it or not, has Americans in it and we are an ornery bunch – not to mention clever.

    My money’s on Americans.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. the unit says:

    Lucky we’re all or almost all seniors. Millennials and younger could get confused on this prepper talk.
    For instance I was confused years ago when the fish market clerk asked me if I wanted the fish I’d picked to be “dressed or undressed.” Huh? How much is a fish tuxedo?
    Rotate food stores. Early model front, late model back. Er…maybe the other way around.
    We know. But it’s the ‘power tower’ I’m confused over. I Google and get something that tones my abs, not charge my batteries. My abs protected from the cold by a few layers of adipocytes. Batteries need charging. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  6. audremyers says:

    the unit – I’d always heard she worked ‘blue’ but I’ve never heard it. And that’s fine. I have listened to David Allen Coe and I’m ashamed about that.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. audremyers says:

    the unit – I had forgotten about Chek. I’ll have to check it out.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Pingback: In The Mailbox: 02.23.21 : The Other McCain

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