Hell Is Too Good for Some People

We don’t speak here a lot about fake news. One reason is because it is so pervasive that it carries a whiff of carrying coal to Newcastle about it. But in a world in which the US sells rice to China… And there is also this: Fake news maliciously hurts people. Witness those kids from Covington, who behaved better than many of us would, and whose lives and families are being threatened because, not in spite of, but because, they are better people than their detractors.

But it is not only the US as this from Bruce Bawer at FrontPage Magazine shows.

I heard the news last week during a quick headline break on Nigel Farage’s daily call-in show. Fifty-five men in West Yorkshire – fifty-five! – had been arrested and interrogated in connection with rape-gang allegations.

That was that. The story was summed up in a couple of sentences and lasted no more than a few seconds. Then it was back to the show.

Later I looked online for more details. Finally I found a 200-word item in the Mirror. But that seemed to be it. I couldn’t locate anything at all about the rape-gang arrests in the Daily Mail, Telegraph, or Guardian.

Think about that, a press so jaded that the story of 55 men arrested for organized gang rape of junior high girls over a period of years, and then trafficking them into prostitution and drugs, with the connivance of the (at least) local government and police, just like thousands of other men have been, leaving who knows how many families broken, is not worth a single word in Britain’s largest papers, left or (sort of) right, or on its state propaganda agency, the BBC . How many families hurt and girls destroyed by that conspiracy. By government and press acting together to suppress the law. Certainly an instance of fake news. Then there is this:

Take the case of Bailey McLaren, a 16-year-old working-class boy from Huddersfield, West Yorkshire. In November, footage of him jumping Jamal, a 15-year-old Syrian-born classmate, in the schoolyard, apparently in October, went viral. Although nobody was seriously harmed in the fracas, the British media rushed to report at length on it. Because Bailey held Jamal down while pouring a bottle of water on his face, he was described as having committed an act of “waterboarding.” Because Jamal was Syrian, Bailey’s action was characterized as “racist.”

In fact no context whatsoever was provided along with the video; the reason why Bailey did what he did was unknown. In the video, he can be heard saying only two words – “You bastard!” – which suggest not prejudice but personal grievance. In any event, what Bailey did do, even though it was arguably uncivilized and even if it were to turn out to have been utterly unprovoked, was no worse than any number of other donnybrooks that occur every day in schoolyards around the world.

Yet the British press went bonkers over it. The Mail, the Standard, the Telegraph, and the Sun were only a few of the papers that ran long, highly charged accounts. The Mail called the video “distressing” and “sickening,” saying that it had “shocked the country.”

Naturally, the police brought Bailey up on charges. Top public officials, too, got into the act. A Member of Parliament named Nadine Dorries “called for ‘serious action’ over the bullying and added the UK should ‘open its arms’ to those facing persecution.” Another MP, Tobias Ellwood, tweeted: “This bully, his parents, the school where this occurs and the onlookers who fail to step in, all have big questions to answer.” Ellwood told BBC Newsnight: “I worry that we are becoming a ‘walk on by’ society where we’re allowing space for these things to happen.” […]

On December 5, Tommy Robinson, who in the midst of his own personal drama had admirably sought to uncover the facts of Bailey’s story, released a video in which he maintained that Jamal is not the innocent victim painted by the media. A woman told Tommy that her daughter, a pupil at the Huddersfield school, had sustained serious injuries as the result of an unprovoked attack by Jamal. In addition, Tommy interviewed the parent of a boy whom Jamal had also allegedly bullied. Tommy even spoke to Bailey himself, whose own testimony was persuasive and moving.

On January 18, Tommy provided a video update. Tommy said that Jamal had threatened Bailey in class just prior to their contretempts and that that, not racial or religious prejudice, was the motive for Bailey’s assault. Tommy accused police of seeking, after the schoolyard video went viral, to relocate the McLarens to a “Muslim ghetto,” specifically to a Muslim-owned B&B populated by drug addicts and prostitutes (an action reminiscent of Tommy’s own transfer, last summer, from a relatively safe prison to a more heavily Muslim one).

According to Tommy, the McLarens wisely refused to move into that B&B; instead, Tommy and some friends helped set up them in a secret location. But what to do now? At this point, practically speaking, the boy and his family are refugees – only, as Tommy put it, they’re not receiving anything like the kind of sensitive, compassionate help that the British government routinely grants refugees (however dubious their refugee status) from other countries.

Bailey’s sisters, who are eleven years old, have been inundated with rape threats and haven’t been able to go to school for two months. (Tommy noted that they’re living in a city, Huddersfield, where “sixty Muslim men” have been put on trial in the past year for raping girls of around that age.) As for Bailey himself, he celebrated Christmas by trying to take his life with a drug overdose. After he spent several days in a hospital being nursed back to health, Tommy personally took him “to see mental-health teams” because the authorities hadn’t done so.

To learn who rules over you, simply find out who you are not allowed to criticise” is an aphorism almost always attributed to Voltaire, so we will too. In any case, it is very apt here, where we speak of a country where it is anathema (and a hate crime) to criticize anything a Muslim says or does.

And so we see a perfectly fine young man all but destroyed by the government, police, and press for a schoolboy brawl against a bully. While thousands of Muslims rape, drug, and sell underage English girls consistently and in an organized manner, without even publicity, let alone sanction by the authorities.

Who is in charge over there? Cause it sure as hell is not the people who are the same kind and decent people they’ve always been. And don’t even imagine that the American press is any better because it is not. Pitchforks are far too kind for people who cover up such things.

Excuse me while I go throw up.

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Sunday Funnies, Wall, Life, and Gillette

So, another week, how nice with the government shut down

Who might this be? *

And, of course

Genevieve Bujold

An Unalienable Right

Yesterday, more than a million Americans gathered to protest America’s violation of the very first right God gave us – the right to life. While there are marches across the country, the focus is always Washington, where the violation of the right was first condoned, and where it will be restored one day.

From The Catholic Herald.

‘This is a movement founded on love and grounded in the nobility and dignity of every human life,’ President Trump said

The March for Life again gathered myriad pro-life advocates to mark the anniversary of legalized abortion in America, and in a surprise appearance Vice President Mike Pence and Second Lady Karen Pence introduced a pre-recorded message from President Donald Trump.

“This is a movement founded on love and grounded in the nobility and dignity of every human life,” President Trump said in a pre-recorded message to the massive January 18 rally, before the crowd began its march through the streets of Washington, D.C.

“When we look into the eyes of a newborn child we see the beauty of the human soul and the majesty of God’s creation, we know that every life has meaning and every life is worth protecting.”

“I will always protect the first right in the Declaration of Independence, the right to life,” he said.

Trump touted his administration’s new expansion of the Mexico City Policy, which restricts funds for international organizations that promote or perform abortions. He promoted his administration’s actions to protect religious freedom for medical professionals and religious charities, as well as support for adoption and foster care. Among new proposals are limits barring Title X funds for clinics that perform abortions; and making permanent the Hyde Amendment budget restrictions on abortion funding. […]

“Every child is a sacred gift from God,” he said. “Each person is unique from day one. That’s a very important phrase. Unique from day one. And so true… Together we will work to save the lives of unborn children.”

Vice President Mike Pence and Second Lady Karen Pence appeared in person to introduce the president and to give their own remarks.

“We gather here because we stand for life,” the vice president said. “We gather here because we stand for compassion. We gather here because we believe as our founders did because we believe all of us, born and unborn, are endowed by our creator with certain inalienable rights and first among these rights is the right to life.”

Pence said that the Supreme Court’s 1973 Roe v. Wade decision “turned its back on that right,” but that decision gave birth to “a movement born by compassion and love a movement animated by faith and truth, a movement that’s been winning hearts and minds every day since.”

Because of those gathered here, he said, “we know in our hearts that life is winning once again.”

Pence praised and thanked pregnancy center volunteers, adoptive families, and “courageous men and women who step forward to serve in public office” in the U.S. capitol and state legislatures. He urged pro-life advocates to “stand strong” and give reasons for their hope “with gentleness and respect.”

“They will attack you, they will question your hearts to silence others but don’t listen to them. Listen to the truth,” he said. He told marchers that God will not forsake them and they do not stand alone.

“Know that you have an unwavering ally in this vice president and this family. And you have a champion in the President of the United States, President Donald Trump.”

He’s right, we are winning finally, a clear majority of Americans want abortion severely restricted or outlawed. It’s up to us to continue the fight, it’s far from over.

It is time, nay, it is well past time for America to again recognize abortion as what it is, infanticide, and treat it as it should be. We owe it to the Founders, and we owe it the over 60 million American dead from this abomination. We best respect their right by continuing the struggle to end abortion in the United States.

 

The Price of Freedom`

Ever have one of those days, where you just don’t have anything to say? A pain, aren’t they? I’m having one today, as always there are multitudes of things to write about, none of which appeal to me. It happens, especially when you write every day.

So, what to do. Well, how about this, Gavin Ashenden, the Queen’s former Confessor, wrote the other day about the price of freedom. It’s an excellent article which I agree with completely, and you may have missed. So here it is.

“I have nothing to offer you except ‘blood, toil, sweat and tears’ ” promised Winston Churchill when he stepped in as Prime minster in 1940. Churchill warned that retaining freedom would come at a high and sacrificial price. The people heard, agreed and paid it.

“Brexit would be bad for my diocese because it might temporarily turn Kent into a lorry park” threatened the Archbishop of Canterbury this month. He was urging people to give up their freedom and repudiate Brexit for the sake of convenience. Kent is a beautiful place. It was a very worthy convenience, but still a convenience. […]

What has surprised and shocked me on the other hand are the threats and fears a no deal outcome has had on people. When the Archbishop warned in his grim tones of the danger of his diocese being turned for a while into a lorry park I wanted to reply “but what price are you willing to pay for you and your church’s freedom”?

And there lies the weakness of democracy. At every election politicians bribe the people with the promise of further comforts and advantages if only they will vote for them; but it ought to be the other way round.

At times of election we ought to have politicians asking for our vote on the grounds that they are going to make life more difficult for us. More difficult because to achieve some valuable or noble goal.

It might be redistribution of income; it might be tightening our belts in the face of overspending. They could ask us to forego certain conveniences in order to protect the ecosystem.

And that’s where the weakness of democracy (the least worst system for government we have) lies. It an increasingly comfortable culture votes can only be bought for self-interest instead of won for virtue. […]

Do the ‘young’ know or remember anything of the BSE crisis in 1996, where responding to European demands we killed and incinerated a million healthy cattle, only to find they still refused to lift an export ban on beef? Even the Euro-friendly Government of the day suspected this had turned into a secret attempt to wage economic warfare against a trade competitor rather than putting health issues first.

(See Archbishop Cranmer’s excellent article :-

http://archbishopcranmer.com/brexit-beef-eu-faithful-bse-trusted-liberty/ )

Have they read anything at all of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn’s Gulag Archipelago where the historical realities of an anti-democratic modern, brutal and murderous Left wing regime was allowed free rein?

Freedom to travel without inconvience is placed the top of their political bucket list, but what are they prepared to pay to retain their democracy and freedom of speech and movement?

There doesn’t seem to be much awareness that freedom comes with a price.

Freedom to vote and to practice democracy and freedom of speech have come at the price of imprisonment in some places and torture and death in others.

It will be a pity of the price of passing our own laws, choosing our own values, guarding our own freedoms come at the slight inconvenience of filling in forms, or paying £10 for a visa to visit another country, but maybe that is one of the choices we face; inconvenience or acccountability?

Do read it all at Freedom costs. Are we willing to pay the cost of being free?

It’s not a question only for the Brits, although Brexit makes it clearer there than elsewhere. It’s a question that all men and women have to answer for themselves. I fear that many Americans, like the Remoaner Brits, have forgotten that, and are willing to sell our glorious heritage for crap, and not much crap at that.

One hopes they wake up before it’s too late.

GOPe and Corporatists

If you haven’t heard yet, Theresa May lost in Parliament, 432 to 202. Which should be a decisive, humiliating result, leading to a change in government, but probably won’t. She is supposed to present her ‘plan B’ to Parliament within three days, and Corbyn has called for a vote of no confidence. FUBAR, in other words. We’ll keep an eye on it.


John Daniel Davidson over at The Federalist wrote about the argument Tucker Carlson unleashed about conservatism, noting what that noted sorta conservative Russ Douthat has commented.

It is time, I think that we have this conversation, as I look around, I see lots of casualties, but let see what the article says.

Over the weekend, Ross Douthat of The New York Times weighed in on the ideological battle sparked by Tucker Carlson’s recent Fox News monologue excoriating GOP elites for slavish devotion to market capitalism and indifference to its negative effects, especially for working-class families.

Carlson’s fusillade provoked a host of reactions from conservatives, some who criticized Carlson for exaggerating the problems caused by capitalism while ignoring its benefits, some who argued he has a point about how capitalism has failed to protect families and create a prosperous working class. “If there is to be a healthy American right, after Donald Trump or ever, this is the argument that conservatives should be having,” writes Douthat, and he’s correct.

Douthat zeroes in on a line from David French of National Review, a critic of Carlson, who wrote: “There are wounds that public policy can’t heal.” Douthat concedes that this is true, but argues it can become “a trap, a cul-de-sac, an excuse for doing nothing.” Too often, conservatives have “leaped to despair without even trying policy.”

He cites a few examples, like the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis and the disappearance of wages that can support single-income households, but then pivots to censorship and prohibition. Douthat notes that the right was once comfortable using public policy to promote private virtue, “But in recent decades, the right’s elites have despaired of censoring pornography, acquiesced to the spread of casino gambling, made peace with the creeping commercialization of marijuana, and accepted the internet’s conquest of childhood and adolescence.”

Douthat’s point is that while public policy can’t cure every social ill, it can be a “corrective”—if conservatives don’t simply throw in the towel.

There is no doubt about it, we’ve taken a lot of losses in the last almost thirty years. Part of the trouble, not the solution, is the GOPe, which talks a good game, but if you don’t like their principles, well they’ll find others.

‘Market Capitalism’ is a good place to start, it ain’t; it’s corporatism, rent-seeking, whatever you’d like to call it. It is designed to benefit the rich, the large, often multi-national corporation at the expense of the citizen and the worker. It’s not an accident, it’s a feature. See Elon Musk, or Enron, or many other examples.

For most of this, remember that politics is downstream of culture. Culture is where we need to win the culture wars, not politics. And you know, I think the pendulum has nearly reached the end of its swing and is starting to return. Be prepared, the war has merely begun. Will we win? Nobody knows but does it really matter, as far as I can see, my duty is to do the right thing and do it to the best of my ability, and what will be, will be. And as always, God decides. But we have before, many times.

The Boring Preaching of the Left

Joel Kotkin wrote recently in City Journal on Today’s Cultural Engineers. It’s pretty interesting.

Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin once labeled writers and other creative people “engineers of the soul.” In his passion to control what people saw and read, Stalin both coddled artists and enforced unanimity through the instruments of a police state. Today, fortunately, we don’t face such overt forms of cultural control, but the trends in American and to some extent European mass culture are beginning to look almost Stalinesque in their uniformity. This becomes painfully obvious during awards season, when the tastes and political exigencies of the entertainment industry frequently overpower any sense of popular preferences, or even artistic merit.

Our cultural climate has become depressingly monochromatic. Award ceremonies, once a largely nonpolitical experience, have become reflecting pools for preening progressive artistes. Those emceeing the awards must be as politically pure as possible—sorry, Kevin Hart—and those winning acclaim get the best press if, besides thanking their producers and agents, they take a shot at Donald Trump.

This dynamic is not exactly the byproduct of popular demand. In recent years, ratings for the Oscars have fallen to the lowest levels since the awards were televised, down from over 40 million to fewer than 30 million. The ratings decline tracks the fall in movie attendance, which has sunk to a 25-year low. We’re a long way from a time when awards nights were dominated by popular mainstream winners such as West Side StoryThe Sound of Music, or even the original Lord of the Rings. The movie industry makes money now by producing sequels of movies based on comic books, with relentless action and violence but little character development.

As movies and television shows in both the United States and Britaintoday increasingly adopt the feminist, gay, and racial obsessions of their makers, they have written off a large portion of the less politically “woke” audience. Many of these shows, such as Britain’s venerable Doctor Whohave hemorrhaged viewers since taking on a more preachy, PC aspect. “It’s supposed to be entertainment,” one disgruntled viewer complained. Late-night television, now dominated by stridently anti-Trump comedians, also has seen ratings drop in recent years; no show has close to the number of viewers, let alone the iconic status, enjoyed by the late—and largely apolitical—Johnny Carson.

That’s certainly true for me. We turned off the TV portion of the cable (it’s the best value on high-speed internet) years ago. I have the stuff to watch most anything on my computer – but I don’t. I don’t think I’ve turned a TV broadcast on yet this year and don’t foresee doing so. Just not interested in anything they’re selling. I used to love Dr. Who, I didn’t make it 5 minutes with the new one.

The problem is they (pretty much every TV program, including the news) have become that preacher that always put you to sleep when you were a kid. They won’t shut up and they won’t change the subject, and so we’re tuning out, shutting it off. Who was it that said a fanatic is someone who won’t shut up and won’t change the subject? That’s US and UK news and entertainment media.

Welp, know what? That same software that lets me watch the current swill they call TV, lets me watch the old stuff. Not uncommon at all to sit back here and enjoy a John Wayne movie, hopefully with Maureen O’Hara, or at least Kate Hepburn, where men were men, bad guys wore black hats, the women were gorgeous and powerful in their own right, but still liked guys. You know kind of like the world most of us still live in. It’s better outside the left’s hothouse. I’m staying out, you’re welcome to join me. The whisky and cigars are on the bar.

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