The Weekly Nonsense

Pretty good idea, I think!

That one is rated as fake – but true.

And that’s the problem with parody accounts, she’s apparently stupid enough to tweet this, so it’s hard to parody.

Of course!

As usual, mostly from Bookworm and PowerLine.

Have a good one!


The Late Week in Review

Well, Good Morning or Afternoon or whatever, somebody seems to have stolen an hour last night. What a joke DST has become.

Almost as big a joke as International Woman’s day, which seems to celebrate leftist, women with good jobs, and without the brains to hold them. Or something.

On March 5, 1982, Actor and singer John Belushi died from an overdose of cocaine and heroin.

On a Mission

A bit wordy, but…

Really, BBC? Even for you, that’s pretty bad.

Yesterday was Chuck Norris’ Birthday. Happy Birthday, Mr. Norris

Of course he’d approve.

As usual, most from PowerLine and Bookworm, and a couple from various posts at Ace.

Have a good week.


Another Week

Let’s start with a bit more from the recent CPAC. We all know Ben Shapiro, and yes, he is one of our great rising voices, but what I find fascinating is that as well as he resonates with us, he speaks just as well to the cousins, who increasingly find our outspokenness to be vital to the cause of saving our freedom.

But it is a two-way street, has been since before America was America, we have looked to England as we learned how to be ‘the land of the free’ and they still produce leaders worth listening to. So a bit of payback, here’s one of theirs, talking to us.

And if there is anything Americans have learned, its how great conservative women are, the American ones, surely, but our British cousins have some great ones too.

And so we continue the mission, knowing that freedom will never be secure, that it must be won in every generation, and also knowing that it is well worth it.

This has been a week filled with sound and fury (most are lately) this week the emphasis has been the continuing effort to disarm the American people. Nothing new, really, just an attack on freedom from a different angle. I predict we will again stand firm.

My kind of guy!

From Ace.

Hard earned wisdom?

Mostly from PowerLine, as per.

Have a good week.


A Weak of Portraits

Why? Why not!

Well, it was the weak err week of the Obama portraits. Well, what did you expect?

Which of these is not like the others?

Prophetic, maybe.

I’m surprised they didn’t pick these!

From the upcoming documentary “CNN: The Obama Years”.

Thanks, OregonMuse at Ace’s


Somehow, this doesn’t seem to happen at my house.

Then there is the Olympics, I guess.

Did you think I’d forget?

Thanks to PowerLine and Bookworm as always.

And one more thing:

Have a good day!



Another Week Gone!

Another week that we’ll never have to live again.

From Ace.



I want need one of these!

Well, OK, I guess, if you say so.


The answer to controversial speech has always been more speech, not less. As Vince Herron writes in the Southern California Law Review, censoring speech is “as ineffective as fighting a fire by spraying water on the tips of the flame while allowing the house to continue to burn.” The fire will never cease to burn. When colleges censor certain viewpoints that are problematic, more harm than good comes from it. Silencing provoking speech does not address bigotry at the root; rather, it is pushed underground and excluded from a robust and uninhibited political discourse that could have occurred. Bhargavi Garimella

Wish I had been that smart in High School!

No wonder Americans are fat, those kute, korner krack dealers are back!

And the highlight of the week!

Mostly from PowerLine this week. Have a good one.


B-Ball and the Chaos Before the Storm

In one of those unpredictable things, last night turned into movie night here, first with Hoosiers and then with Darkest Hour. It is an interesting pairing.

In the first, we have the eternal American story of the underdog, the Milan Huskers, overcoming the big city South Bend Central Bears, a quintessentially American story of the underdog overcoming the big city favorite. And all the better for being true.  See this post. But it carries over to the Darkest Hour as well.

Here we have Britain, holding firm alone amongst the Europeans against the Nazi Germans. When all the others buckled, there was Britain, standing alone, as it had against Napoleon. The nation of shopkeepers standing alone, waiting for the new world to step to its rescue.

And here again, a half-century later it becomes true again. The ruling class in the UK has sold out to the left and left the real conservatives without representation, but we know many proud Britons remain. And so. once again the New World prepares to rescue the Old World.

We know what they do not wish to acknowledge, and we are OK with that, but that is the situation. I always wonder if the situation would have worked out if Winston Churchill’s mother hadn’t been Jennie Jerome, an American. It’s an interesting point to ponder.

And we see it once again, the British establishment unable (or unwilling) to confront the leftist tide in their own society, the right taking their cue from their own daughter society, the United States. That is not a bad thing, when necessary we too have taken inspiration from our British forebearers. As I’ve said before, the difference is that we wrote it down.


You know as I continue with these subjects, increasingly it strikes me that only Americans recognize the difference between good and evil as opposed to what sounds good, feels good, but is in reality not good at all.

As for the movie, Darkest Hour, I liked it. Yes, the scene in the underground that so many have talked about is jarring and unbelievable but is there to make the point about the differences between normal and those in the ruling class, who then and now, existed in a bubble.

But do see it, in truth since both are out, pair it with Dunkirk, they portray nearly the same week, and the difference between the calm of London with the chaos of the evacuation beaches is important itself.

No movie is really historically accurate, and that is true for all three we’ve mentioned here. But movies can make a point that is hard to convey in written words, and all three do here. Hoosiers remind me of much of what I loved about growing up in Indiana, some of which is lost forever, as it always is.

The other two speak of a time just a bit before mine, when the entire world was chaos, and a very few people took the duty to lead us through the storm and did it without thinking overly of the effects it would have on them. For all of us today, these are the people who built the world we live in, and it behooves us to try to understand them, as once again chaos threatens us.

In any case, see the movies, you’ll enjoy all three.

%d bloggers like this: