The Week, mostly on Twitter

From Breitbart:

The House held hearings on reparations the other day. I doubt the Democrats liked what Super Bowl Champion Safety Burgess Owens had to say. But I do and I suspect many of you will as well.

Pretty much a nuclear truth bomb – delivered from orbit.


Senator Tom Cotton is not pleased that so many corporations are explicitly pushing liberal dogma, especially infanticide abortion on their employees and the rest of us. Here’s why: [via Ace].

I’m very rapidly turning into a huge fan of Senator Cotton. I just ordered his book on his tour with the 3d Infantry (the Old Guard) as well.

His points here are welcome ones. Too often we in business forget there are many things more important than the bottom line, especially the quarterly one, which is the one a lot of libertarians and finance types think is the be all and end all.

Floppy Joe Biden inserted his foot in his mouth the other day (yes, I know, a regular occurrence) about getting along with segregationists (not to mention racists) in the old days. Senator Cotton had something to add to that, as well. [via The Right Scoop]

Yes, indeed. It is long past time that we call the Demonrats out every time they try to shift the scumbags off on us. Good on both of you Senator and Mr. Trump.

Speaking of Trump, President Trump in this case, his campaign kickoff the other night was amazingly good.

John Hinderaker at PowerLine calls him a force of nature. I agree, and in so being he makes America one once again. And I note that CNN couldn’t stand the heat and cut off the broadcast as soon as he started talking about them and the rest of the fake news media. Typical. They spent a fair amount of time wingeing, but then they made their bed and they can damned well lie in it. With luck, it will be their deathbed.

And along that line, you’ll know that Iran shot down an American drone the other night. Apparently, the return strike was aborted at about T-30 seconds. Nobody knows why the President so decided, but the Mullahs would be very wise to consider it a final warning.


I hear we are going to start mass deportations of illegal immigrants next week, starting, I trust with lawbreakers and troublemakers. Not everybody is pleased.

So, it’s pretty obvious if Senator Harris thinks that removing these illegal immigrants, who are forbidden to vote in federal elections is changing the electorate, it follows that Senator Harris’ party has been attempting to change the electorate by using illegal immigration and also by committing vote fraud which is a felony.

Probably shouldn’t have said that for the record, Senator, but few have accused you of intelligence, most people who sleep their way to a better job aren’t too bright after all.

Hong Kong Protests

Hong Kong: Anti-extradition protesters block government HQ | World News | Sky News

Have you heard much out of Hong Kong lately? Me either. But there is a lot of protesting going on there. Why? Because China wants to extradite people to stand trial in China rather than Hong Kong with its western (British) rule of law. From Reuters.

Hong Kong braced for strikes, transport go-slows and another mass demonstration in protest against a proposed extradition law that would allow people to be sent to China for trial, as the Chinese-ruled city’s leader vowed defiance.

Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam said she would push ahead with the bill despite deep concerns across vast swaths of the Asian financial hub that triggered its biggest political demonstration since its handover from British to Chinese rule in 1997.

In a rare move, prominent business leaders warned that pushing through the extradition law could undermine investor confidence in Hong Kong and erode its competitive advantages.

That’s no doubt true, but I doubt it is the most important reason than HK with its westernized population, used to proper courts and such, is up in arms.

Britain handed Hong Kong back to China under a “one-country, two-systems” formula, with guarantees that its autonomy and freedoms, including an independent justice system, would be protected.

But many accuse China of extensive meddling, denying democratic reforms, interfering with local elections and the disappearance of five Hong Kong-based booksellers, starting in 2015, who specialized in works critical of Chinese leaders.

Sunday’s protests plunged Hong Kong into political crisis, just as months of pro-democracy “Occupy” demonstrations did in 2014, heaping pressure on Lam’s administration and her official backers in Beijing.

She warned against any “radical actions”, following clashes in the early hours of Monday between some protesters and police after Sunday’s otherwise peaceful march.

Police erected metal barriers to secure the council building as a small number of protesters started to gather on Tuesday evening despite torrential rain and thunderstorm warnings. Police conducted random ID checks at train stations.

Nearly 2,000 mostly small retail shops, including restaurants, grocery, book and coffee shops, have announced plans to strike, according to an online survey, a rare move in the staunchly capitalist economy.

Eaton HK Hotel, which is owned by Langham Hospitality Investments and operated by Great Eagle Holdings, said it respected workers’ “political stances” and would allow them to rally.

The student union of several higher education institutions and the Hong Kong Professional Teachers’ Union urged people to strike on Wednesday. Nearly 4,000 teachers said they would rally.

Human rights groups have repeatedly cited the alleged use of torture, arbitrary detentions, forced confessions and problems accessing lawyers in China, where the courts are controlled by the Communist Party, as reasons why the Hong Kong bill should not proceed.

“When the fugitive extradition bill is passed, Hong Kong will become a ‘useless Hong Kong’” said Jimmy Sham, convenor of Civil Human Rights Front. “We will be deep in a place where foreign investors are afraid to invest and tourists are afraid to go. Once the ‘Pearl of the Orient’ (it) will become nothing.”

The Catholic Diocese of Hong Kong called on the government not to pass the bill “hurriedly” and urged all Christians to pray for the former colony.

Read it all, I have little to add, save that there is little we, Britain, or anybody else can do. I had a bad feeling when the UK handed the colony back, even if the lease was running out. In truth, it lasted longer than I thought it would, but it has worked to China’s advantage, apparently China no longer thinks it does.

But it wasn’t one of Britain’s greatest hours.

Making Sense of American Conservatism

And so, time to start trying to make sense of the world again, I guess, Matthew Continetti has a long piece up at The Washington Free Beacon called Making Sense of the New American Right. It’s a valiant effort at a nearly impossible subject. Let’s look.

The story goes that, for many years, American conservatives adhered to a consensus known as “fusionism.” Economic and social conservatives put aside their differences. Freedom, they decided, was necessary for the exercise of virtue. The struggle against and ultimate defeat of the Soviet Union was more important than domestic politics or intramural disagreements. Conservative intellectuals eager to privilege either freedom or virtue like to attack this consensus, which they often describe as “zombie Reaganism.” The truth is that the strength of fusionism always has been exaggerated. The conservative intellectual movement has been and continues to be fractious, contentious, combustible, and less of a force than most assume.

Episodes of division and strife are far more common than moments of unity and peace. The more you study the history of American conservatism, the less willing you are to describe it in monolithic terms. There isn’t one American right, there are multitudes, every one of them competing for the attention of politicians and policymakers. The most prominent and politically salient varieties, as expressed in William F. Buckley Jr.’s National Review, Irving Kristol’s Public Interest, Norman Podhoretz’s Commentary, and William Kristol’s Weekly Standard, have weakened or disappeared altogether. One of the reasons the intra-conservative argument has become so personal and acrimonious is that nothing has replaced them.

Indeed, the situation today is awfully similar to that which confronted conservatives in the 1970s. Then, the Buckley consensus had to find a modus vivendi with neoconservatives as well as with the Catholic integralists around Triumph magazine, against the background of a populist revolt that called out failing elites while relying on racial and ethnic appeals that sometimes crossed the border of decency.

Indeed, that consensus is what many of us to today deride as ‘cocktail party conservatism’. It is one of the things that Donald Trump blew up on his way to the White House, with the willing help of many of us. We also tend to believe these are the people who gave us never-ending wars, mostly to enrich their friends, while denigrating our troops.

The rise of Donald Trump, Brexit, and nation-state populism throughout the world certainly suggest that something has changed in global politics. American conservatism ought to investigate, recognize, and assimilate the empirical reality before it. The trouble is that no one has concluded definitively what that reality is.

Not for lack of trying. Beginning in 2016, intellectuals who favored Trump have been searching for a new touchstone for conservative thought and politics. These writers are often described as populists, but that label is hard to define. Broadly speaking, they have adopted the banner of nationalism. They believe the nation-state is the core unit of geopolitics and that national sovereignty and independence are more important than global flows of capital, labor, and commodities. They are all, in different ways, reacting to perceived failures, whether of Buckley conservatism, George W. Bush’s presidency, or the inability of the conservative movement to stop same-sex marriage and the growth of the administrative state. And they have turned away from libertarian arguments and economistic thinking. Not everything, these thinkers believe, can be reduced to gross domestic product.

And that is an important concept. Too many, whom some call the ‘Chamber of Commerce’ Republicans do believe it is all about the GDP. And what is even worse, they tend to believe the best GDP is taken from the quarterly balance sheet. This very short term thinking has led to the deindustrialization of the US (and Britain and some other nations). There is nothing wrong in profit-seeking, but there is in putting short term profit ahead of the firms long term best interest. And that is what I see all too often.

That is rather the foundation of what we are going to be talking about, there is a lot out there, both in the linked article and some others. So much that there is at least one but probably two (maybe more) articles in it to talk about, since I write articles and not books here. So let’s discuss this much and we’ll continue, hopefully, tomorrow, if the creek doesn’t rise too much.

Sunday Funnies: D-Day 75

D-Day 75, The President and the Queen, The beat goes on.

Meanwhile

Women in Stem

And, of course

 

The State Visit Begins

And so it begins, as always without public drama from the principals, although Trump has already told Khan to STFD, although he was rather kinder about it. Here’s what it looked like at Windsor Castle

It’s nice to have Russia today, that way we don’t have to listen to the very nearly hateful commentary from British and American commentators.

The main point of the week is, of course, to pay honor to the warriors of the Anglosphere who, starting this week, 75 years ago freed the continent of Europe from the Nazis.

A bit before my time, but not all that much, and I remember men who were there, and who lost friends on those much-honored beaches.

Interesting this morning, that my favorite British political blog, The Conservative Woman has no less than three articles that bear on the President’s visit.

  1. Donald backs Nigel – so how about you, Tory hopefuls?
  2. Thirty reasons why we welcome you, Mr President

  3. A guide to Britain for Trump – and the Remainers

All good, and touching on different facets of our special relationship.

There is also this, from one of the most sensible men in Parliament, Sir John Redwood

Why President Trump deserves Britain’s respect

He’s right of course, but neither should we forget the respect we owe Britain. Our conceptions of liberty, freedom, and all things to do with a proper society come from this foggy little island. They talk about the Mother of Parliaments, and they are not wrong, but there is so much more, here is where the power of the king was first checked by the Barons, and then by the Commons, and now the people are undertaking the task of checking the power of the Commons, and their very own version of the swamp that we too are fighting.

And remember, of us all, this week. the British are the ones who voluntarily entered the war to try to save Poland, the rest of us responded to attacks. These are incredibly brave and moral people. They like us, worry that things have changed, well, I’ll be surprised if they really have.

And yes, it was fun to see the Queen and the President reviewing the troops while the band played the US service songs. As we’ve often said, “Nobody does it better!”

Heritage and Pride

So the President the other day, gave the graduation speech at the US Air Force Academy. Typically, it was a good and well-researched speech. Here it is. You won’t miss much if you start 15-20 minutes in.

I noticed that the Secretary of the Air Force quoted TS Elliot’s Little Gidding, a great favorite around here. The President was, as usual, excellent and on point. How refreshing it is to hear an American leader use the word victory, and to mean it.

I’m also impressed that he chose to shake the hand and return the salute of every graduating senior/lieutenant. Not many would, it’s one of the reasons he shows as a proper leader. Something those shiny new lieutenants will remember all their lives.

And so, the Long Blue Line extends another thousand people long. I’ve known quite a few over the years, they are the best of America, as are the people from the other service academies. But this is the one that I wanted to go to, but couldn’t get a waiver.


Meanwhile, the Foreign Minister of Mexico sits in Washington wondering if he’ll get to talk to anyone before those tariffs kick in. Seems to me there isn’t much to talk about, either the invasion of the United States ends, or the tariffs kick in. Pretty basic stuff.


And then it’s off to England to have dinner with the Queen, but not Jeremy Corbin or the Mayor of London, no loss in that. Probably find time for a chat with Nigel and Boris as well.

And then to Portsmouth to celebrate that seventy-five years ago, the Anglo Saxons once again rescued a continent from tyranny and that the continent hates us still for it. Well, Lions and Eagles care little what prey thinks about things. And in truth, there is no doing things for some people.

But we’ll continue on over to Normandy, because the French people do remember, whatever the faults of their leadership, and it is time to again visit our dead, who died to make Frenchmen free.

It is going to tax even President Trump to top another American President who thirty-five years ago said this.

The Rangers looked up and saw the enemy soldiers — the edge of the cliffs shooting down at them with machineguns and throwing grenades. And the American Rangers began to climb. They shot rope ladders over the face of these cliffs and began to pull themselves up. When one Ranger fell, another would take his place. When one rope was cut, a Ranger would grab another and begin his climb again. They climbed, shot back, and held their footing. Soon, one by one, the Rangers pulled themselves over the top, and in seizing the firm land at the top of these cliffs, they began to seize back the continent of Europe. Two hundred and twenty-five came here. After 2 days of fighting, only 90 could still bear arms.

Behind me is a memorial that symbolizes the Ranger daggers that were thrust into the top of these cliffs. And before me are the men who put them there.

These are the boys of Pointe du Hoc.

These are the men who took the cliffs.

These are the champions who helped free a continent.

These are the heroes who helped end a war.

Gentlemen, I look at you and I think of the words of Stephen Spender’s poem. You are men who in your “lives fought for life . . . and left the vivid air signed with your honor.”

I hear that the Queen likes President Trump, not that I know it, but it seems likely, he must remind her a bit of those Americans she met back in the day when she was Princess Elizabeth learning to fix and drive that ambulance. Here she is, the very last veteran of that long ago war, still doing her duty, to God and Country. Long Live the Queen!

And so, next week, the rabble will once again protest an American President, but many will also remember what the poet said in the weeks before D-Day.

Boadicea from the Bridge looked down,
And saw the Yankee tanks invade the town.
Boadicea held her head more high
To hail the Sherman and the proud G.I.
‘Eyes right!’ she said. ‘Fine fellows though you are,
You’re not the first to drive an armoured car.
Halt, soldiers, halt! For here is one can tell
A tale of fighting chariots as well.
Look up, brave girls. In a.d. 61
I led the lads, and saw the Roman run.
God speed you too against an alien mob:
God bless you all for joining in the job.
By Grant! By Sherman!’ said the queen of queens.
I wish I’d had such men, and such machines.’

They passed. And Parliament, across the way,
Discussed the principle of equal pay.

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