Global Warmists Angry Half The Earth Isn’t Covered In Ice

I’ve said any number of times that I don’t believe that the case has been made for anthropogenic global warming/global cooling climate change. That’s especially true in the last 50 years as the industrial nations have cleaned up their act, well the first world ones, anyway.

Climate change has been happening ever since climate got started, that’s a different story. Is it conceivable that we did affect the climate when the industrial revolution was going strong. Yes, it is. Like the current scenarios, it’s not proven but as this article shows, I think it is more likely than the current crony capitalist/rent seeking scenario. Think about this for a while, maybe industrialization came just in time to save us from an ice age. Wouldn’t that be ironic?

A newly published study indicates human-caused global warming starting shortly after the Industrial Revolution may have helped the Earth narrowly avert a catastrophic ice age, and global warming advocates and their mainstream media allies are very angry about it. Yes, really.

For the past 3 million years, the Earth has undergone a regular cycle of long ice age glaciations occasionally interrupted by short warm periods. The glaciations last approximately 100,000 years and the warm periods last an average of only 10,000 years. Our present warm period has been in existence for 10,000 years, leading many scientists to worry that a new ice age glaciation may be imminent.

A study in the science journal Nature examined the natural cycles that cause the cyclical glaciations and warm periods and concluded that by the 1800s—after 500 years of cooling temperatures during the Little Ice Age—the conditions were at hand for the Earth to end its 10,000-year warm period and plunge into another full-blown glaciation.

During glaciations, ice sheets more than a mile deep cover much of Europe, Asia, and North America. The Nature study concluded human-caused global warming may have been the deciding factor preventing the plunge into another ice age. The study also noted that ongoing human-caused global warming may be preventing such a plunge even today.

via Global Warmists Angry Half The Earth Isn’t Covered In Ice.

Someone We Should Remember

English: Commodore Grace M. Hopper, USNR Offic...

English: Commodore Grace M. Hopper, USNR Official portrait photograph. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

What does it take for someone to have a navy ship named for them, and a tech conference as well? How about if it’s a woman? It takes a lot. Likely though, you’ve never heard of her.

I’m lucky, I guess, I have. She was the graduation speaker (a good many years ago) when my niece graduated William and Mary. She was also a pretty good speaker. Who was she? Professor Admiral “Amazing Grace” Hopper, PhD.

Grace Hopper isn’t a household name. But it should be.

As Megan Smith, Chief Technology Officer of the United States, noted in the short documentary The Queen of Code:

“She’s like an Edison of our day. Like a Turing. And yet Hopper isn’t with those names in the history books. And it needs to be.”

Why Should Hopper’s Name Be in the History Books?

Let’s start with this: To the best of my knowledge, Grace Hopper is the only person in history to have both a tech conference (the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing — the world’s largest gathering of women technologists) and a U.S. Navy destroyer (the 500-foot, 7,000-tonU.S.S. Hopper) named in their honor.

Those two accolades might begin to give you a sense of just how extraordinary the accomplishments of Professor Admiral “Amazing Grace” Hopper, PhD truly were. (And yes, those titles are legit.)

In 1934, Hopper became the first woman to earn a PhD in mathematics from Yale (which she earned in absentia while teaching math and physics at Vassar College). Then, in 1985, at the age of 78, she became the first woman to reach the rank of Admiral in the U.S. Navy.

As you might imagine, a lot of stuff (in this case, stuff that would revolutionize the world of computing) happened in-between those two events.

In 1943, Hopper joined the Naval Reserves. Three years later, she was assigned to inactive duty at Harvard’s Computation Laboratory, where she worked on programming the Mark I — the first computer that could automatically execute long computations.

In 1949, she joined the Eckert-Mauchly Computer Corporation, where she worked on programming the UNIVAC I — the world’s first large-scale electronic computer.

Hopper was one of the first computer programmers … ever.

Know the expression “debugging” a computer? Hopper was one of the first people to use it. And at the time, it referred to literally removing bugs (moths, in particular) from computer components.


During her time at Eckert-Mauchly, Hopper had a breakthrough idea — an idea that would come to define her computing career. After noticing that her fellow programmers were constantly writing the same commands over and over, Hopper suggested that they write their commands down once and then store them in shared libraries.

By 1952, this idea had evolved into the world’s first compiler (Hopper’s greatest innovation), which allowed programmers to store and recall code using English language-based commands.

But You’ve Probably Never Heard of Her

Source: There’s a Navy Destroyer & a Tech Conference Named After This Person — ReadThink (by HubSpot) — Medium

A truly great woman, who get far less recognition than she deserves for her seminal, and objectively stunning contributions, that in large part have made the world we live in possible. Another Edison? Yes, but maybe even more, perhaps another Nikola Tesla, because of the wide range of applicability of her inventions.

Whittle, Cruz, and Polls

Bill Whittle on Ted Cruz and media bias.

You know that may explain something. Have you noticed, as I have, that in the age of Obama, we conservatives/Republicans (whatever, whichever, and don’t forget right libertarians either) can’t seem to win a national election, but we have something like 75% of the state legislatures, most of the governorships, and everything else? Could this be the effect of the media’s completely unbecoming (and beclowning) love for Obama? I think it might be.

We’ll see, if the presidential candidates can manage to quit thinking that they can ingratiate themselves with the hostile media, and play through (around, over, and under) them, to the people, we may see both the demise of some very rotten edifices and a fresh new breeze in politics.

Frankly I have no problem with biased press outlets, they always have been. Don’t believe me? Look into the election of 1800. Our problem today is that they are all biased one way. Nor does it help that they are catastrophically wrong, unAmerican, anti-Christian, and a few other things, not to mention very, very intolerant.

I think this may very well be connected as well

For the most part, with some notable exceptions, the polls have been pretty accurate predictors of presidential and midterm elections. That was until the recent midterm elections in the United States in 2014. While they predicted the GOP would pick up some senate seats with an outside chance, if everything went right, of taking over the Senate, none of the polls predicted the tsunami wave by the GOP in not just winning the senate easily with room to spare, but also with big gains by the GOP in the House of Representatives and in pickups in the state houses and governorships.

The reliability of the polls was questioned by some, but not by many as you could say one election, as big as it was, do not the polls make. But then you had a couple of big foreign elections that were missed by the pollsters and missed in a huge way.

In March of 2015, Benjamin Netanyahu’s Likud Party won in a landslide victory, and re-elected for an un-precedented 4th time Bibi Netanyahu as Prime Minister, that no poll showed would happen. In fact, every single poll in Israel just days before the election had Netanyahu and Likud losing and losing in a big way.

Then in May of 2015, you had polls showing that in Great Britain there was a very tight race for Prime Minister with a good chance the Conservative Party was about to be thrown out of power. What happened, a huge win for the conservative party and re-election of David Cameron as Prime Minister.

So, beginning with the 2014 Midterm elections, and continuing with major elections in Israel and Great Britain in 2015, the polls have been not just wrong, but not even close to predicting the correct results.

You might conclude that it shows you can’t rely on the polls in a major general election not just in the United States but around the world. No, that would be the wrong conclusion. That is one of the secondary conclusions you might surmise from this downward slide of accuracy by major pollsters but not the correct one.

There is one common thread that those variances of what the election results showed with the polling results before hand. In the United States midterms, and in Israel, and in Great Britain, the pollsters were wrong and wrong in a big way, all in one direction. Their polls were all off in determining the strength of the conservatives [party’s/individual candidates] in those countries and in overstating the strength of the liberals [party’s/individual candidates]. Could that possibly be just an amazing coincidence or indicative of skewed polling results that we will be seeing in future elections? Fool us with one bad polling result, shame on you. Fool us with 3 bad polling results, and we still believe in you, shame on us.

Source: Reliability of General Election Polls Continue Downward Slide In One Direction.

Do you follow my reasoning here? Again we have a business based and linked to both the national governments, and the corrupt press, who pays their bills. Yes, there are new difficulties in polling, such as so many people no longer having landline telephones (and others). But while that could well affect accuracy, one would expect it to effect it in both directions, but that’s not what we’re seeing, is it? It’s always favoring the more liberal (American sense) candidate, and never the more conservative (Classically liberal). And so as it becomes an increasingly inaccurate tool, something will have to change like, I don’t know, real reporting, maybe!

Ave atque Vale

Vulcan-Last-Touchdown

The Last Touchdown

One of those planes, an old friend who helped keep us free, and helped Maggie remind the Argies who they were messing with, made its last flight the other day.

She is a beautiful lady to watch, and if you haven’t seen footage of her at the airshows, or on the Port Stanley raid, look it up. There’s three still running and able to taxi, but the flying is past. But when you’re running out of riggers and fitters, that’s what happens. From WeaponsMan:

Even the name was over the hill: Avro, the company named for dawn-of-flight founder A.V. Roe, went the way of one firm after another: merged into a soulless, nationalized conglomerate in a series of Socialist-policy forced consolidations of the British aircraft industry. In the end, they wound up sending British aero engineering talent to Canada, and Canadian bungling (with the Canadian Avro company front and center) banked them off and down to the United States, where they were critical to the success of Apollo. The Avro Vulcan was the last of the line that began with spindly triplanes of bamboo and muslin and that rained terror and death from the night skies over Germany.

“If a single bomber gets through,” boasted Hermann Göring, today dismissed as a buffoon but a leading World War I ace, “you can call me Meier!” And a single bomber didn’t get through, but hundreds, and then a thousand — Handley-Pages and Vickers and, chief among them, Avros, every night the weather enabled flying, and some nights it really didn’t, and by day the Americans gave the repair crews and fire brigades no rest.

In the late 1940s, Britain was a nuclear power, and it had one of the world’s most powerful navies and a first-class air force. The British nuclear deterrent originally comprised a fleet of bombers, and for this purpose, three new airframes were designed, the “V-bombers,” the name redolent of V-E Day and referring to the plane’s names. Three airframes were chosen because the performance demands were so high that some of the engineering teams were taking great risks. One jet was a very conservative design (the Vickers Valiant), in case of failure of the two using radical wing planforms: the sickle-shaped “crescent wing” Handley Page Victor and the delta-winged Avro Vulcan. All three planes succeeded, but the performance of the Victor and Vulcan ensured a short life for the Valiant.

Source: Ave atque Vale: Flying Avro Vulcan | WeaponsMan

Vulcan-VX770

Over here we have a saying, that describes her well:

The Sound of Freedom

She’ll be missed.

It’s time to shatter the myths of the Battle of Britain

Today commemorated the climax of the Battle of Britain. You know the one, the one they made films about. And those few we still remember

‘The Few’ were immensely courageous, but the image of plucky Little Britain, David against the Goliath of Nazi Germany, is completely misleading

Seventy-five years ago today, fierce aerial battles were taking place over London and southern England, and later that evening, after the fighting was over and there was still no sign of a German invasion, reporters on the news announced some 185 enemy planes had been shot down. To all who heard it, and a large proportion of the population did, it appeared a significant victory had been won. Later, it emerged Sunday September 15 had also been the target date for Operation Sealion, the planned German cross-Channel invasion. With the RAF Fighter Command still in robust health, attempting such a high-risk venture was unthinkable. Two days later, Hitler postponed Sealion and then, on October 12, put it off indefinitely. Air battles continued and the night-time blitz lasted until May the following year, but the risk of invasion had passed.

Britain won because it was ready and prepared to fight such a battle

Few moments in British history have been so mythologised, however. Woven into the story is the image of plucky Little Britain, David against the Goliath of Nazi Germany. We portray ourselves as backs-to-the-wall amateurs, with those young and gallant Few the last line of defence against the mighty Molloch – after all, the Home Guard were not going to be much good against hordes of Panzers. By a whisker, we held out – but it was a close run thing and thank God Hitler decided to switch from attacking airfields and turned on London instead. It was tough on the East End, but it gave the RAF breathing space and the fight back was on.

Source: It’s time to shatter the myths of the Battle of Britain – Telegraph

That’s pretty much true, and I think we should add that fully integrated air defence system (in the summer of 1940) is above all one of the bequests to his country of Neville Chamberlin. For this is what he bought for Britain at Munich with his ‘piece of paper’. He too is one of the few, who placed his honour and his courage at the disposal of his country. Americans will recognize that we had nothing like it in Hawaii, over a year later.

And here is a bit more of the most beautiful aircraft ever built.

 

 

 

Downtown

You all know that I don’t subscribe to ‘The Cult of Celebrity’. but in a fairly long lifetime, there have been a few exceptions, in the field of popular music there is only one, and we’re going to talk about her today.

One of you this week linked to my all time favorite singer, and one of my favorite songs, that she sang. When it burst out of the car speaker, late in 1964, a lot of things changed, for American music, for her, and maybe more.

This is the version from The Dean Martin Show in early 1967, and yes it was still getting some airplay.

When Downtown came on the radio, it was completely different, and it spoke to something in us all, I think. her voice is very obviously British, in that exact way, that Americans adore, and as far as us kids were concerned she was was one of us, although our dads (sometimes) did tell us that she had been recording since during World War II, and was a TV star as well, in the UK.

That’s all true, but she was also the first British female to make it onto the Billboard chart since Vera Wang in 1952. Downtown was #1 starting the week of 23 January 1965. The song was also #2 in the UK, and Ireland, and number one in  Australia, New Zealand, Rhodesia and South Africa, and was also a hit in Denmark (#2), India (#3), the Netherlands (#3) and Norway (#8). She was far from the last, though, the Atlantic got very narrow there for a few years, and American top 40 radio sounded an awful lot like BBC 1. And after Downtown, she would have fourteen more consecutive hit on the Billboard chart, and there was plenty of competition those days.

When asked why he approved it for a quick release in the States since it was so very English. Joe Smith of Warner Brothers replied: “It’s perfect. It’s just an observation from outside of America and it’s just beautiful and just perfect.” And you know, it was, and it is still.

But there was a lot more to Pet, than that wonderful voice, she is perhaps one of the greatest female entertainers of the twentieth century, like Julie Andrews, Judy Garland and such. In fact I think she could have been  better than them all, by a fairly wide margin. here’s a bit more about her.

When they talk about how she became Norma Desmond in the play, it’s sort of creepy, isn’t it, but that is what the great actors do, it’s why we are able to suspend our disbelief for a while. Petula could, and did, do it too, even on the concert stage. Watch her eyes her, closely, this is more than singing, I think she is feeling it, even as she shares the emotions with us.

So let’s head on Downtown, but remember Don’t Sleep on the Subway.

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