Gaudium et Spes: The Church in the Modern World

eb1050dd-5a47-45db-9243-08b6c3276143This Newman Lecture is by the Rt Revd Philip Egan, Bishop of Portsmouth, whose title is also the title of the post.

Bishop Philip is a graduate of King’s College, London and the University of Birmingham (PhD, Theology). He undertook his formation for the priesthood at Allen Hall, London and the Venerable English College, Rome, and was awarded his Licentiate in Sacred Theology (STL) from the Pontifical Gregorian University.

He was ordained to the sacred priesthood in August 1984 and served as an Assistant Priest at St. Anthony’s, Woodhouse Park (1985-8), before becoming assistant chaplain at Fisher House to the University of Cambridge (1988-91).

He was appointed Chaplain to Arrowe Park Hospital, Wirral (1991-4) before doing further studies at Boston College, Ma. For twelve years, he was on the formation staff of St. Mary’s College, Oscott, the major seminary in the Archdiocese of Birmingham, where he was the College’s Dean of Studies and Professor of Fundamental Theology. He returned to Boston College as a post-doctoral research fellow of the Lonergan Institute in 2007, before being appointed Parish Priest of Our Lady and St. Christopher’s, Romiley, near Stockport in 2008.

In 2010 he was appointed Vicar General of the Diocese of Shrewsbury and in 2011 a Prelate of Honour to his Holiness Pope Benedict XVI and in 2012 a Canon of Shrewsbury Cathedral.

Bishop Philip is frequently asked to speak at theological symposia and at catechetical gatherings and he has regularly contributed to religious journals and magazines. He has written about the thought of Newman and Lonergan and recently published Philosophy and Catholic Theology: A Primer (Collegeville, 2009).

This is, sadly, the last of this years Newman Lectures. We have been proud to again bring them to you.

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Our lovely @NewmanLectures team – Tvm @SiobhanHoffmann@deeksgeorge@mattmediauea@TBaragwanath@Katyy_s#newman2016pic.twitter.com/pq033ggOOo

— John Charmley (@ProfJCharmley) April 25, 2016

 

One of the things that always fascinates me about these lectures is that while they are mostly done by Catholic clergy, how appropriate they are for us all. Here for example, in telling us about how Vatican II effected the Church, he also tells us a deal about why the Catholic Church is becoming not like us conservative Protestants, exactly, but perhaps why it has become so much easier for us to work with Catholics on matters of the faith. And besides, for all of us, John says it well, here:

 

And so, we come to the end of another year’s worth of Newman Lectures, we hope you have enjoyed and profited as much from them as we have. I also want to add my thanks to the team that works so hard to put these on.

And especially thanks to Professor Charmley and Deacon Andrew, for making these possible.

If you wish to review any of these just click the tab on the top of the page that says, “Newman Lectures’ at any time.

As always, sponsored by:

Diocese of East Anglia

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The Changing Faces of the Papacy

This is a fascinating overview of the last 50 or so years of the Catholic church, not so much a lecture as an audio/visual memoir. While he doesn’t take anybody’s side in the controversies racking our churches, he gives a perspective on why things are as they are, one of the best talks I’ve heard anywhere. I think you’ll enjoy it, and profit from it.

His Eminence Cardinal Cormac Murphy-O’Connor

Cardinal Cormac Murphy-O’Connor is a retired bishop and cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church, Archbishop Emeritus of Westminster and former President of the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of England and Wales. He was created a cardinal by Pope John Paul II in the 2001 Consistory.

The next, and last, lecture for this year will be Bishop Philip Egan, Bishop of Portsmouth

Sponsored by:

Diocese of East AngliaUEA

Newman Lecture: Bishop Graham James

From his biography:

The Rt Revd (Dr) Graham James
Bishop of Norwich

The Rt Revd Graham James was ordained in Peterborough in 1975 and later working in Welwyn Garden City, Church House – Westminster (where he had responsibility for overseeing the selection procedures for candidates for ordination in the Church of England), Canterbury (where he was appointed as Chaplain to the Archbishop of Canterbury, Robert Runcie, and later, George Carey).
He was consecrated Bishop of St. Germans in 1993, returning to his native Cornwall, but moved to Norwich at the end of 1999 and was enthroned as Bishop of Norwich on 29 January 2000.

Bishop Graham has been an active member of the House of Lords since 2004. He is currently Chair of the Ministry Division which is responsible for the selection and training of all candidates for ordination.

Bishop Graham has also been a Board Member of the Countryside Agency and been much involved in rural issues. In 2011, he was invited to join the Lords Select Committee on Communications and took up the responsibility as the Church of England’s lead spokesman on media issues. He is patron or president of over thirty organisations and a regular guest on BBC Radio 4’s Thought for the Day.

 

I found this to be a very interesting lecture, especially with regards to the modern history of the Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham, which as Jessica has told us, was before the Reformation one of Catholicism’s great pilgrimage sites. It seems in many ways to be becoming one again, it’s certainly on my list of places I want to go. I also find it interesting that the first Catholic Mass held at the Shrine was by the United States Army Air Forces, shortly after VE day.

Sometimes we forget, especially those of us that are Protestants, that our traditions, like our Roman brothers and sisters, go back to Jesus, not just to the Reformation.

Next week will be as Professor Charmley noted, a bit of view from the other side of the hill with Cardinal Cormac Murphy-O’Conner, former Archbishop of Westminster.

As always, sponsored by:

UEADiocese of East Anglia

 

 

 

 

 

 

Newman Lectures

Francis CampbellThose of you who were here last year at this time will remember that we carried, the audio of and some pictures (videos when the speaker agreed) from the Newman Lectures, sponsored by the University of East Anglia, and the Diocese of East Anglia. We are again going to carry them, as they become available, barring technical glitches, which do happen, as we all know.

This year has a very distinguished group of presenters

  • 4 April:   Francis Campbell, Vice-Chancellor, St Mary’s University, Twickenham
  • 11 April: Dr. Graham James, The Bishop of Norwich
  • 18 April: Cardinal Cormac Murphy-O’Connor, Former Archbishop of Westminster
  • 25 April: Bishop Philip Egan, Bishop of Portsmouth

I’m very excited about this lineup, and also again working with John, Andrew, and Siobhan. So if you can’t make it to Norwich, don’t miss out completely.


 

THE CHURCH IN SOCIETY AND ITS RELATIONSHIP TO THE STATE

The first Newman lecture this spring was by Francis Campbell. His CV is most impressive:

Currently Vice-Chancellor of St Mary’s University, Twickenham, Francis has had a long and distinguished career, working as – amongst other things – Policy Advisor and Private Secretary to the Prime Minister, Senior Policy Director with Amnesty International, and British Ambassador to the Holy See from 2005 to 2011.

Probably wouldn’t hurt to add for us Americans, a British Vice-Chancellor is an American university president.

Enjoy, a most interesting lecture.

These lectures are sponsored by:

UEADiocese of East Anglia

 

 

 

Next will be: Dr. Graham James, The Bishop of Norwich

‘John Lydgate’s Medieval Identities: Monk, Poet, and Graffiti Artist’ The Newman Lecture

CAPGo1jWMAA7Ab6So after our Easter break we have the last Newman Lecture of this season. This one is by Dr. Karen Smyth of the University of East Anglia speaking on John Lydgate’s Medieval Identities Monk, Poet, and Graffiti Artist.

Karen Smyth is a Senior Lecturer in Medieval and Early Modern Literature at the University of East Anglia.

As always, Professor Charmley’s live tweeting of the lecture is included in Storify form in the link following the Soundcloud. please do follow the link, there are a lot of pictures with this one.

‘John Lydgate’s medieval identities: monk, poet, and graffiti artist’ Dr Karen Smyth (with images, tweets) · ProfJCharmley · Storify.

CONFESSION: YESTERDAY AND TODAY: The Newman Lecture

Another fascinating lecture, which gave me some insights into my own life, as well as why ‘confession is good for the  soul’,. As usual the Storify is linked below the Soundcloud, and Professor Charmley outdid himself in live-tweeting this one, there is a huge amount of meat here for your digestion.

Professor Henry Mayr-Harting is former Regius Professor of Ecclesiastical History at the University of Oxford (1997-2003), amongst many other honors.

 

//storify.com/ProfJCharmley/confession-yesterday-and-today-professor-henry-ma/embed?border=false[View the story ” ‘CONFESSION: YESTERDAY AND TODAY’ Professor Henry Mayr-Harting” on Storify]
On a personal note, Yay! for me, I got quoted as well. 🙂
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