25 or 6 to 4

Usually, I let Audre handle our nostalgia for our America posts but I’m going to put my size eleven Hiliners in here. Back in 2013, I talked about the music growing up around Chicago in the ’60s. The relevance will become clear later. But as Audre said, “We had the best music”. She’s right and it came from Chicago. I said this then.

And after those games there was often a sock hop, and while sometimes there was a DJ, there was always a live band, and some of those DJ’s you’re going to meet here today. Why? Because Chicago was a huge music center in the 60s. You see in those day we all listened to AM radio, FM barely existed, and even 8 tracks were uncommon (and expensive). By the way did you know that for a few years you could buy a record player that mounted under your car dash-they actually worked pretty well, too.

But those AM radio stations, in Chicago there were two who did what we would call top 40 now, although then it was more just plain current rock, both 50,000 clear channel stations. Anybody that was around can tell you about WLS and WCFL even all these years later. They were part of our life, back and forth we went, second button on the car radio was usually LS and third CFL. Like all the early American call letters, they meant something, WLS stood (originally) for the World’s Largest Store (Sears Roebuck and Co.) and WCFL for the Chicago Federation of Labor.

The clear channel thing meant that in North America there was no other station on that frequency, 890 and 1000 Kilocycle/second (hertz) respectively. Especially at night, you could hear them from Pittsburgh to Denver, and down to the Gulf of Mexico, depending on some variables. And those bands I mentioned, I’ll be you’ve heard of some of them, here, let’s let them talk for themselves

It was glorious, about the only outsider that penetrated for me was Petula Clark, well what can I say a cute redhead. But the only one who survived was the revolution that Sgt Pepper inaugurated was Chicago, and they had to move to California to do so. One of their big hits was this.

It’s still great, isn’t it? This is the sound that came from a Chicago garage band, albeit one at DePaul University. But you know, it’s still current. Watch this.

How about that 50 years later and still relevant to our young people. Chicago always rocked, and they still do.

And just because I can, my other favorite from the period, which is also applicable to much. Crank it, the louder the better it is.

See you at Bifrost

Hat tp to RS McCain.

 

Critical Race Theory

We really shouldn’t go around criticizing and demanding that things should not be taught to our kids or forced on us without understanding what they are. That’s pretty much common sense. So what is Critical Race Theory that has led the President to uncompromisingly condemn it? The best explanation I have seen comes from Sargon, and it’s easily worth 20 minutes of your time.

 

I think he is spot on correct. The whole thing is not so much anti-white as it is anti English and American. Why? Because for the last 500 years the English and the Americans have led the world in freedom, in prosperity, in almost any measure that indicates a better life than any other, at any time in history.

The only place where I mildly disagree with him, and its a matter of degree, nothing more, is that all these characteristics are more emphasized in Americans than they are in the English.

There are several causes of this, one is that when our first founders came over they were the generation of English who most adored freedom, to the point that it wouldn’t be long before they fought a war against the King, and executed him. Many of those first and second generation proto-Americans returned to England to take their place in the Parliamentary ranks. The situation of the frontier from then until at least 1900 also shaped us to understand that these characteristics were the way, and the only way, we were going to survive, let alone thrive.

And his example towards the end is very illustrative. Do you know anybody who would want to associate let alone consider her (I guess) a friend? Sorry, I’m not even close to being egalitarian enough to have any interest in being equal to that individual in anything at all. I choose not to run around demeaning myself or any other person, as long as they are doing their best. The only equality I care to share with this person is equality under the law.

Another place where Sargon is correct is when he reminds us not to let the enemy define the terms we use.

Sunday Funnies; The Nomination and More

And so, now we know

Keep this in mind, it is not Ginsburg’s seat nor is it a liberal seat. It belongs to the American people, and we long ago gave the President the power to nominate and the Senate to advise and consent on whom we allow to sit in it. They are doing what we said.

 

The Redhead of the week will never be as beautiful as this one. Right, Jess? Although I can think of one candidate.

Heh! My kind of Governor

But be careful fishing!

And of course

Blackstone, Marshall, Court Packing, and RBG

So, we expect the President to nominate a Supreme Court justice within a week. This is news but it should not be an earthquake in Washington, yet it is. Why?

In large measure, it harks back to Marbury v Madison, the case that established judicial supremacy over the constitutionality of a bill. Thanks, Chief Justice John Marshall. I’m actually fairly well persuaded by his reasoning that he got the meat of the argument correct. Yet in a curious reversal of normal procedure, after he heard the arguments and found for the plaintiff (A Justice of the Peace in DC William Marbury) whom Jefferson declined to send his commission to, a clear duty of Secretary of State James Madison.

Then and only then, did Marshal by finding the Judiciary Act of 1789 was unconstitutional, violating Section III of the Constitution by giving the Supreme Court original jurisdiction where the Constitution gave it only appellant jurisdiction, Interestingly, in something current readers will recognize this was a case of a Writ of Mandamus, just as the revocation of the FBI’s charges against Lieutenant General Flynn is.

A Writ of Mandamus is sort of a catch-all for when there is no other relief available. Blackstone says in the third volume of his Commentaries, quoted by Marshall that:

‘In all other cases,’ he says, ‘it is a general and indisputable rule, that where there is a legal right, there is also a legal remedy by suit or action at law whenever that right is invaded.’And afterwards, page 109 of the same volume, he says, ‘I am next to consider such injuries as are cognizable by the courts of common law. And herein I shall for the present only remark, that all possible injuries whatsoever, that did not fall within the exclusive cognizance of either the ecclesiastical, military, or maritime tribunals, are, for that very reason, within the cognizance of the common law courts of justice; for it is a settled and invariable principle in the laws of England, that every right, when withheld, must have a remedy, and every injury its proper redress.

I include this mostly as a reminder on how US law grew out of the English Common Law. In any case, Madison v Marbury is really an insignificant case involving not very much, except for the rendering invalid of  The Judiciary Act. This is where the Court obtained the power to invalidate a law duly passed and signed.

Not much else bears on the subject until we get to the 1930s. The Supreme Court was deluged by a huge number of cases contesting the constitutionality of almost all the New Deal legislation, and nearly always finding it unconstitutional. The old conservative federal courts at work, as usual. But Franklin Roosevelt was incensed, he wanted to run the economy centrally from Washington, because he was smarter than the average citizen and knew what was best for them, and what was best was a cradle to grave welfare system. He basically owned Congress, with supermajorities subservient to his every whim, but the Court was blocking him.

This is the point where in 1937 he threatened to pack the court. The Democrats in Congress, to their credit, were aghast at the effrontery and the threat to the Consitution, but he submitted his bill to the House (as was customary), if I recall it never came to a vote, then he submitted it to the Senate with the same result. And so he was stymied, as designed by the founders.

But the threat scared the Court, and suddenly it changed course and we got the New Deal which made the Great Depression both longer and worse than it had been. To the point that the man that ended it was a guy by the name of Adolph Hitler.

From that time on, the Democrats have used the Court as a super legislature, doing things that the American people would never approve of. The two things we speak of most are abortion and gay marriage, neither things that would pass in any American Legislature, other than California, maybe.

In short, we live in what can be fairly termed a kritarchy, a regime ruled by judges.

And that makes the next Supreme Court Justice a matter of life and death both for the Republic and for the Democrats.

Random Observations

If we are lucky – and realistic – we come to the conclusion that the way we are right now is not such a bad thing. We come to a kind of comfortable place with that person in the mirror.

I no longer worry if my butt “looks big in these jeans”; it has become completely irrelevant to me whether I have big boobs or members of the ‘itty bitty titty committee’; that a ‘bad hair day’ is going to ruin someone’s opinion of me; my very short fingernails are just fine without rainbows and glitter and junk embellishments pasted on; that I needn’t worry about how I look because nobody looks at a woman my age anyway (although I do have to admit, I try to look presentable whenever I go out – I strive to not be a Walmart shopper video). It’s a process. When we were babies, we had to learn to sit up (and stay up!), learn to eat, learn to talk, learn to walk. At the other end of that, we have to learn to edit what we eat, sitting up can sometimes be exercise, we need to stand for a moment to make sure everything is lined up properly before we take a step, we sometimes need to search for a word. It’s a process.

By and large, it ain’t all that bad. And neither am I. And neither are you. We’re still shakin’ it the best we can. What I used to do on a dance floor, I now do in a desk chair to certain music videos. I think a little more before I do anything so I don’t wind up looking ridiculous or hurting myself and thinking more is always a good thing. I have found more forgiveness – for myself and others. I have reached the conclusion that ‘they’ were right all along – material things don’t make you happy; they may make you more comfortable but not necessarily happier. ‘Happy’ is within you when you come to that point of realization that it wasn’t all about you after all. Who needs that kind of pressure? My work, it turns out, didn’t define me, it was simply what I did. What defines me is my kids and how they turned out; my siblings and the fact that we still all love and enjoy each other. That I have been able to share my faith journey and help others on theirs. That the best Thanksgiving dinner wasn’t the one that turned out perfectly but the one where I ruined the gravy – they still talk about that. I created the only gravy known to man that could be spread on bread. The simple joys are the best ones and it’s exactly because they are simple.

I find that I am content. That’s quite a statement to make. There’s a lot to be said of contentment; it’s kind, warm, comfortable, and reassuring. I think it’s a reward for having made it this far. If it is, I’m all for it.

 

Samizdat

Samizdat is the name given to the underground passing of messages between dissidents in the old Soviet Union. Where everybody knew that Pravda was lying to them. Now it refers to all of us, bloggers, news aggregators, citizen journalists, even legal monitors the most famous being Judicial Watch.

It’s happened in the United States and Great Britain for the same reason it did in the Soviet Union, the legacy media almost never tells us the truth. And now, if you read these sources, you know more about what is happening than anybody at the NY Times or the Guardian, in the boardroom of any of our large corporations or especially broadcasters like CNN (coming to be better known as XiNN) or the BBC.

One of the reasons this grassroots (real ones) effort is so successful is simply because it bounces around the Anglosphere so quickly. You may well get a story from Australia first here, or on some British blogs before your local Australian paper deigns to cover it (if they ever do). Just as happened with that young, pregnant mother arrested and handcuffed in front of her kids for making a Facebook post.

Somebody else who has noticed is Jack Cashill writing at American Thinker. He says:

[Speaking of professional sports] The players all endorsed the BLM movement or appeared to. So did the sportscasters, the advertisers, the TV networks, Hollywood, Big Tech, the New York Times, the major magazines, and just about everyone with a prominent soapbox except for Fox News — and even Fox waffled.

Had the execs been paying attention, however, they would have understood that the same forces that supported the BLM protest also supported Hillary Clinton. In 2020, as in 2016, the major media’s collective control of the BLM messaging was subverted by the samizdat’s ability to record and distribute the facts on the ground. For the first time in history, ordinary people know more real news than do the people in control of America’s major newsrooms.

V.P. candidate Kamala Harris has yet to catch on. Allying herself with Kenosha’s Jacob Blake, Harris paid a visit to Blake’s family last week and spoke to Blake on the phone. “I mean, they’re an incredible family,” said Harris. “And what they’ve endured, and they just do it with such dignity and grace.”

Times readers applauded. They, like Harris, did not know what the samizdat knew. For starters, the dad of this incredible family, Jacob Blake, Sr., is likely no fan of the Times, having tweeted not too long ago, “The Jewish controlled media tells you what they want you to hear.” This was one of many anti-Semitic tweets from the old man.

The samizdat also know that the son from this incredible family, Jacob Jr., broke into the home of an ex-girlfriend, digitally raped her in front of a sleeping child, and stole her car keys and debit card. Police issued an open warrant for Blake’s arrest on sexual assault charges and a restraining order, the violation of which prompted a call to the police.

The day when Joseph Pulitzer could tell a photographer, “You provide the photographs and I’ll supply the war.” are long gone.

It’s most advanced in the United States, but Britain and Australia are quickly narrowing the gap. And those who know are getting angrier by the day. Yes, we have President Trump, who knows this, but they haven’t managed to find their equivalent yet. I predict they will.

Kipling was right though, and they should fear his words.

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