Thy will be done.

Basically speaking, 73.8 million prayers were lifted. The realist in me has come, sort of, to a reconciliation that the Biden/Harris ticket won. All that’s left to do is the crying.

It’s especially hard, I think, for Christians who do firmly believe in the power of prayer. How do we ‘measure’ the effectiveness of prayers against actualities not of our choosing? While we may be hurting, I think it’s important to step back and look at things dispassionately.

First of all, America has been moving in this direction for quite some time. We did little to recognize it, let alone stop it. We just went along because, well, we’re busy and who has time to work these things out while juggling kids and work and family issues and the day to day trials and tribulations of the work a day world. Secondly, who could have foreseen the tremendous accomplishments of President Trump when he assumed power four years ago – did any one of us think he’d have such breath-taking success?

The thing to remember, when we scratch our heads and wonder if God has deserted us, is that for God, this is all just one long day. He sees the beginning, the middle, and the end of all things all at one time. He knows and sees what we can never know and see. There is always a reason. There is always the fulfillment of His plan. This turn of events may be a chastening; it may have an outcome, over the next four years, that we simply can’t imagine. But whatever the future holds, He is still in charge and ultimately, His will will be done – on earth, as it is in heaven.

So, as folks say, buck up, buttercup. He’s given us the strength to get through all that we’ve surmounted throughout our lives and we’ve lived through tough times as a country and we will, with His help, get through this as well. Don’t stop praying for our country; don’t stop praying for the President of the United States no matter who he or she may be; don’t stop praying for our governments and the people who man them. He hears us. But always remember, “THY will be done”

The Last Man Standing

07 June 2007 – Hollywood, California – Sean Connery. 35th AFI Life Achievement Award Honoring Al Pacino held at the Kodak Theatrer. Photo Credit: Russ Elliot/AdMedia

When I was young, I had two, sort of diametrical heroes on film. the first surprisingly nobody was John Wayne. He epitomized what I thought an American man should be: taciturn, always fighting (and honorably) for the right, and persistent enough to accomplish the mission, even if he never really got the girl, even when, as Jess has said, he deserved to. Heck, I even liked The Green Berets, although even as a kid, I recognized it as a propaganda flick. But his films, especially the ones produced by John Ford still reflect my idealistic youth.

The other was Sean Connery who died last weekend at 90. He was the suave sophisticated Brit that not only saved the world but not only got the girl, he got all the girls, and what girls they were. Much as I always really liked Kate Hepburn, only Maureen O’Hara could hold her own in this company. What teenage boy wouldn’t like that gig?

He took Ian Fleming’s not very well drawn and ambiguous (in many ways) archetypical OO agent. and made him the only real competition the Duke had in my mind. Sure I liked Jimmy Stewart and as I learned more about him he grew in my eyes, But in my 13-year-old world, he was a much lesser man than Bond, James Bond. I doubt I was alone, in fact, I’m sure I was not. And almost all the girls I knew wanted to be with him, no matter what they said. He was a man in the same sense as the Duke, but he had a hell of a lot more fun.

The rest of the guys who played Bond just didn’t work for me then or now, although Daniel Craig comes fairly close.

But Connery was so much more than Bond. He was Robin Hood, and Indiana Jones’ dad (who was even tougher than Indy) personified. He made you believe that the Red October really could run away from the whole Soviet Flett, and he was a convincing British Paratroop Brigadier. The only thing he couldn’t do is play a victim or a milk toast type character. That wasn’t in him. He was a man’s man, and even more, a boy’s wanting to be a man’s man.

And so as we wish him Godspeed, we recognize that he may have been the last man standing. And that man was a hero to many of us. Mission accomplished, Mr. Bond.

Venezuela, and Maduro

On Saturday, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo addressed the United Nations Security Council on the situation in Venezuela. He was beyond outstanding, as he spoke very clearly indeed.

The UN, being its normal useless self, has, of course, ignored the situation, as SECSTATE says

“My former colleague, Ambassador Haley, lobbied for a year to get the council to address Venezuela but her pleas fell on deaf ears. This meeting is long overdue. And you all know why it’s overdue.” 

He also spoke of how bad it really is down there:

Maracaibo, Venezuela. Credit: pixabay. Free for use.

“Today nine out of ten citizens live in poverty. Millions lack access to drinking water and food. Three out of four hospitals have been abandoned. Three million Venezuelans have been forced to flee their homeland thereby flooding the region and threatening international peace and security.”

Then there clattered very loudly a gauntlet thrown on the floor, by the United States

“And now it’s time for every other nation to pick a side. No more delays, no more games. Either you stand with the forces of freedom or you’re in league with Maduro and his mayhem.

Some countries have publicly taken former President Maduro’s side. China, Russia, Syria, and Iran are just four of them. . . .”

And to be fair, some, especially in Europe, reluctantly picked it up, Spain, France, Britain, and Germany voting for a free Venezuela. Not, of course, that (other than Britain, perhaps) they’ll be of any real use. But at least they didn’t vote with Russia.

Scott Johnson over at PowerLine says he the best Secretary of State since George Schultz. I have no argument with that.

In something that may prove significant Venezuela’s military attache to the United States, Col. José Luis Silva issued a statement Saturday, as well.

“As the Venezuelan defense attaché in the United States, I do not recognize Mr. Nicolás Maduro as president of Venezuela.”

“My message to all armed forces members, to everyone who carries a gun, is to please let’s not attack the people. We are also part of the people, and we’ve had enough of supporting a government that has betrayed the most basic principles and sold itself to other countries.” [adding]

“Captains, commanders: Think about everyone who suffers. Don’t forget that your wives also can’t find milk for your children. Don’t forget that your mothers and fathers also can’t find pills for their [blood] pressure.”

In the meantime, the Russians sound like the Soviets with their warmed over rhetoric. I mean, really?

“Venezuela does not pose any threat to peace and security. The intention of the United States is to orchestrate a coup d’etat.” 

Washed up, repetitive and past their sell-by date, that’s the Russian Confederation. The world moves on, and they simply aren’t that effective a threat anymore. See ya around, Vlad.

And now I see that former Reagan administration Assistant Secretary of State Elliott Abrams is appointed our new special enjoy for Venezuela.  Excellent.

 

Video Thursday, Anglosphere Edition

Apropos of nothing much else I will say today, this is former Senator Bob Dole of Kansas, holder of the Bronze Star and the Purple Heart from his time as a Second Lieutenant in the 10th Mountain Division in the Second World War. Senator Dole was wounded badly by machine gun fire in Italy in April 1945 and now at 95 years old is unable to get out of his wheelchair, but he did, to salute his comrade, and his friend, President George H.W. Bush, in the Capitol Rotunda the other night. President Bush who was a Naval Lieutenant, and an aviator who flew 58 missions against the Japanese, and is a holder of the Distinguished Flying Cross, the Air Medal, and a Presidential Unit Citation.

https://www.mrctv.org/embed/535349

Whatever your politics, these men are great Americans, who need to be honored. Indeed it is men like Lieutenants Dole and Bush (and millions more) who earned their generation the title of ‘The Greatest Generation’.

And it also ends the presidents who served in that now distant war, George H.W. Bush, who was a Lieutenant, who enlisted on his 18th birthday will be the last of a line that started with General of the Army Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1953. All good men and true, whatever their politics. We are already missing them.


We damned well don’t do PC here, which you know, and so we will not be told what songs to listen to. From Neptune’s Daughter the original version of Baby, It’s Cold Out There. Enjoy

Then there is the UN Migrant Compact. The US and Australia, having a decent respect for their citizens have said that they will not sign it. The Canadian and British governments, who do not, say they will. Not much surprise, both are globalists nonentities, who apparently are merely in politics for themselves. In truth, my British patriot friends use much, much stronger language. I agree with them.

Sometimes we forget, the Canadians are some of the best and bravest people on earth. But they do elect the most detestable people sometimes.


Mark Levin, Heather MacDonald, do I really need to say more?

Well, I try to remember that the world has been going to hell in a handcart since the year 00, sometimes it doesn’t help much.

Trumping the UN, and Cutting Our Own Throats

If you haven’t seen President Trump’s excellent speech at the UN, here it is.

There are quite a few highlights, but the only one I’ll put here is this:

We cannot allow the world’s leading sponsor of terrorism to possess the planet’s most dangerous weapons. We cannot allow a regime that chants “Death to America,” and that threatens Israel with annihilation, to possess the means to deliver a nuclear warhead to any city on Earth. Just can’t do it.

Long ago, like Lou Aguilar at The American Spectator, I saw the 1953 movie The War of the Worlds. I remember it much the way he does, especially this:

The setup comes soon after the A-bomb fail. A desperate general tells physicist Gene Barry (in a superb stoic performance) that there’s nothing more his military can do against the Martian war machine, and the last best hope for Earth is for Barry’s band of scientists to develop some sort of chemical weapon. They drive trucks full of scientific equipment into the last city standing, Los Angeles, only to have its panicked residents manhandle Barry, smash his equipment, and seize the truck in a suicidal attempt to flee the Martians. “They cut their own throats!” declares the shaken Barry to his colleagues.

The image of a berserk crowd destroying its best long-term bet for illusory gain could be a metaphor for the upcoming midterm elections. Under the management of Donald Trump and the Republicans, this country has seldom been in finer shape. It enjoys record-high employment, consumer confidence, stock value, and rising wages. Two nuclear threats have been reduced, and a terrorist caliphate dissolved to attain that most elusive balance of peace and prosperity. And none are benefiting more from this condition than the three pillars of progressive identity politics — blacks, Hispanics, and women. Black, Latino, and female unemployment have never been lower.

He is exactly correct. These are by almost any measure, the good old days, and they are improving by the week. But what are we seeing? A slow moving soft coup in the government, a revolt of the opposition party who is putting their thugs into the streets, just as the Blackshirts and Brownshirts were in Italy and Germany in the 20s and 30s. Not to mention the spectacle of one of the best judges in the country dragged through the mud (not of his creation) for partisan political purposes. The whole garish spectacle has become sickening, and must be tamped down, or we will see violence in the streets.

This is all quite literally insane. It threatens the freedom of the United States, and cannot be tolerated. Jefferson wrote in The Declaration of Independence, and we all believe that: “Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed.”

Surely, one does not throw prudence to the wind when things are going well for almost everyone. Only a deluded fool or an ideologue (often the same thing) would even think of such a thing. But that is where the United States is.

Well, in just a few weeks we will have an election, the projections run from a blue wave to a red tide, with the blue wave getting more press (given the press’ bias, that should surprise no one) but even conservative pollsters are warning of such a thing

But Lou’s last paragraph is spot on so it will end my post as well.

It really is a War of the Worlds, between the real world and a fantasy one. Right now, the fantasists are leading. If people vote them into power this November, they will be cutting their own throats.

Through a Glass Darkly

One of the most reliably astute observers of the world is Victor Davis Hanson, one of those rare people known by their initials: VDH, nearly universally. But even he varies some in the quality of his observations, from excellent to outstanding. This may be as good as anything I’ve read from anyone, anywhere.

The Post-War Order Is Over

Empirically speaking, neo-Ottoman Turkey is a NATO ally in name only. By any standard of behavior — Ankara just withdrew its ambassador from the U.S. — Turkey is a de facto enemy of the United States. It supports radical Islamic movements, is increasingly hostile to U.S. allies such as Greece, the Kurds, and Israel, and opposes almost every foreign-policy initiative that Washington has adopted over the last decade. At some point, some child is going to scream that the emperor has no clothes: Just because Turkey says it is a NATO ally does not mean that it is, much less that it will be one in the future.

Instead, Turkey is analogous to Pakistan, a country whose occasional usefulness to the U.S. does not suggest that it is either an ally or even usually friendly.

And, perhaps, as a new sense of realism invades Washington, the actions of the US may begin to match that reality.

There is nothing much left of the old canard that only by appeasing China’s mercantilism can there be a new affluent Chinese middle class that will then inevitably adopt democracy and then will partner with the West and become a model global nation. China is by design a chronic international trade cheater. Trade violations have been its road to affluence. And it seeks to use its cash as leverage to re-create something like the old imperial Japanese Greater East Asia co-prosperity sphere. U.S. trade appeasement of Beijing over the last decades no more brought stability to Asia than did nodding to Tokyo in the 1930s.

There is also nothing sacred about the European Union. It certainly is not the blueprint for any continental-wide democratic civilization — any more than Bonaparte’s rigged “continental system” (to which the EU is on occasion strangely and favorably compared to by its proponents). The often-crude imposition of a democratic socialism, pacifism, and multiculturalism, under the auspices of anti-democratic elites, from the Atlantic to the Russian border, is spreading, not curbing, chaos. The EU utopian mindset has altered European demography, immigration policy, energy production, and defense. The result is that there are already four sorts of antithetical EUs: a renegade and departing United Kingdom, an estranged Eastern European bloc worried over open borders, an insolvent South bitter over front-line illegal immigration and fiscal austerity, and the old core of Western Europe (a euphemism now for German hegemony).

Interesting to watch the EU, isn’t it? The original conception was indeed a United States of Europe, consisting mostly of (The New) Germany and France, with England fully allied to the United States (not a vassal state by any means, a partner). If I understand what I read, that was Churchill’s conception. But!

As for Germany, it is no longer the “new” model West Germany of the post-war order, but a familiar old Germany that now pushes around its neighbors on matters of illegal immigration, financial bailouts, Brexit, Russian energy, and NATO contributions, much as it used to seek to expand Prussia and the Sudetenland. German unification now channels more the spirit of 1871 than of 1989. Call the new German attitude “Prussian postmodernism” — a sort of green and politically correct intimidation. Likewise, in terms of the treatment of German Jews, Germany seems more back in the pre-war than in the post-war world.

As far as the U.S., Germany has redefined its post-war relationship with the America on something like the following three assumptions: 1) Germany’ right to renege on its promise to spend 2 percent of its GDP on defense in order to meet its NATO promises is not negotiable; 2) its annual $65 billion surplus with the U.S. is not negotiable; 3) its world-record-busting account surplus of $280 billion is not negotiable. Corollaries to the above assumptions are Germany’s insistence that NATO in its traditional form is immutable and that the present “free” trade system is inviolable.

Soon, some naïf is going to reexamine German–American relations and exclaim “there is no there.”

I think some naif just did, and in his exclamation was the words, It is unfair for the United States to subsidize the welfare state of these Prussians, and so tariffs to export to the United States will increase until they are equitable.

And that’s important, the Germans need to export that steel, and be defended by the US (and British) Army far more than either country needs to import Mercedes. There is only one outcome for Europe, the only declining market in the world, in a trade war with the United States: They lose, probably badly.

The West Bank’s rich Arab patrons now fear Iran more than they do Israel. The next Middle East war will be between Israel and Iran, not the Palestinians and their Arab sponsors and Tel Aviv — and the Sunni Arab world will be rooting for Israel to defeat Islamic Iran.

And I notice that in the last week, Russia is starting to tell Iran to pull back from the Israeli border, before Russia gets engulfed as well. Iran’s economy is essentially as bad as Venezuela’s, and sanctions haven’t even been reapplied yet. The Iranian truckers, taxi drivers, teachers and probably others are on strikes, the nationwide protest continues, and calls for a revolution have started.

Finally, we’re seeing the end of the old truism that the U.S. was either psychologically or economically so strong that it could easily take on the burdens of global leadership — taking trade hits for newly ascendant capitalist nations that ignored trade rules, subsidizing the Continental defense of an affluent Europe, rubber-stamping international institutions on the premise that they adhered to Western liberalism and tolerance, and opening its borders either to assuage guilt or to recalibrate a supposedly culpable demography.

Historic forces have made post-war thinking obsolete and thereby left many reactionary “experts” wedded to the past and in denial about the often-dangerous reality before their eyes. Worse is the autopilot railing for the nth time that Donald Trump threatens the post-war order, undermines NATO, is clueless about the EU, or ignores the sophisticated institutions that hold the world together.

About the only metaphor that works is that Trump threw a pebble at a global glass house. But that is not a morality tale about the power of pebbles, but rather about the easy shattering of cracked glass.

There’s quite a lot more at the link above, you should read it.

That is pretty much what I see as well. All is in flux as it hasn’t been since 1940, where it ends is hard to see, maybe impossible. But you know, I’m inclined to think that the American people, in electing Trump, have found the leader who sees a way to lead his people into the next epoch, whatever it brings, successfully.

If I’m right, it’s a good time to be a friend of America, if I’m wrong, there is likely a new dark age approaching. Yeah, its a time for Churchillian terms.

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