The Political Class and Assisted Suicide

I’ve been reading Clarice Feldman, albeit sporadically since Obama’s first term. What with one thing and another, I quit reading American Thinker, not because of anything they wrote, more of a time issue than anything else. But with all three Spectators behind a paywall, I needed something to fill that niche, and Thinker works admirably.

Clarice’s Pieces for this week is one of my favorites in a long time. As usual written in a fairly light, easygoing style, but making a solid point. It’s entitled, The Political Consultants Assisted Suicide Center. Enjoy!

My neighbor, E.Z. Ryder, fancies himself a farsighted entrepreneur and is always full of imaginative ideas. He was sitting on his front porch shuffling through a stack of blueprints as I pulled into my driveway. He waved and motioned me to join him, so I walked over.

“See these plans? This is by best idea ever — an assisted suicide center for political consultants.”

“What? Why?”

“I got this idea during the last presidential campaign, and this article in the Atlantic confirmed it,” Ryder said. “Political consultants burn through billions of dollars and have no idea what they’re doing except to enrich themselves.

“They do a number of things over and again of limited effect: TV and radio ads, direct mail, robocalls. And burn through money they do. Jeb Bush’s campaign famously spent $139 million and he dropped out early after having won only four delegates. Top men. Hillary’s campaign juggernaut was defeated by Donald Trump who had no super PAC, no traditional fundraising operation, no campaign pollster, speechwriter, or campaign strategist.”

I couldn’t help but agree. “He utilized Twitter and Facebook, mass rallies, and sold campaign gear like MAGA hats, didn’t he? And he spoke his own words, not something poll tested by his staff. He mapped his own strategy, paying attention to voter sentiment and things like the Electoral College.”

Ryder chuckled. “No one pays much attention to those annoying campaign robocalls and the TV ads help only those who sell snack foods or need bathroom breaks.”

“They do spew out slews of talking points for the media,” I pointed out. “If your candidate is a Democrat, that may be helpful, but it is of little use to Republicans. Media love stuff they only have to republish with minor changes — like the headers indicating the source, but first and foremost they are Democrat operatives.”

Keep reading.

I think she raises a valid point here. The consultants and other assorted wannabe wizards seemed to work for years, but those were the years when the electorate wasn’t paying much attention, cause things were pretty much going OK. But that isn’t really true anymore, is it? Actually, things are going quite well, but a fair proportion of the country hasn’t got over losing the last election and have continually thrown their toys out of their playpen, and so for a lot of us, well we’re bloody well tired of the damned noise. Personally, I’ve been an independent all my life, but for the life of me can see no reason at all to ever vote for a Democrat again. They’ve simply proved that they run the gamut from untrustworthy to seditious. So my choice of candidate will be in the primary, and to be honest, the more a candidate is like Donald Trump, the more he will appeal to me.

You see, I’m one of what is called a character voter, if you’re honest and fairly close to practical, preferably with some real-world experience, I don’t have a need for us to agree on every jot and tittle. Broadly, almost all of us who have earned a living tend to agree on the basic things. That is what I like about Trump, he’s worked hard, screwed up and more or less failed (like so many of us) got back up and started over. That my sort of guy or girl.

I used to know some Democrats like that, but they’re gone, all that’s left in that party are the grifters, that have legally or not made a living off the public purse all their life. The country is too screwed up now to take a chance on them as dogcatcher let alone what their overweening ambition makes them think they should be doing.

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