Hurricanes, and Language Without Politics

Well, I don’t know about you, but with a monster hurricane blowing the through the Caribbean only a week or so after Houston got flooded, with reports last night of a big earthquake in Mexico, and with nuclear sabres rattling around, I having trouble focussing on politics, and so I won’t today.

If you’re even close to the threatened zone from Irma you should probably take the Unit’s advice, after all, he’s lived his life down that away. He’s said this last night.

For anyone following Irma, Mark Sudduth out of North Carolina does about the best job of explaining what to expect from her. I think this link will take one to his site.
http://hurricanetrack.com/

Hunker down, guys!

Other than that Bookworm found something interesting.

The English we hear when watching a Shakespeare play is not how Shakespeare spoke. Watch this video and be amazed how familiar he would have sounded.

One of the fascinating things linguists do is trace accents back through history to try to find the “root” accent. I’ve long known that people in Appalachia, Australia, and New Zealand probably speak an English closer to 16th-18th century English than any other English speakers in the world. That’s because they left England during those eras and, being sparsely populated and without a lot of population movement, preserved the English that they brought with them from the “Mother Country.”

Knowing that, though, and actually hearing it are two different things. Here is a short, delightful disquisition about Shakespeare’s English versus the modern “received” version. Incidentally, if you’re anything like me, you’ll find the Shakespearean version easier to understand. Perhaps that’s because I have an American ear for language:

She’s right, I did too. Was that true for you as well? But the English language tells of the journey our people have made, all the way from the island of Frisia, around the world and to the moon. It’s part of us, and it’s become part of all those who have dealt with us, and they too are represented in our language. It’s part of our history of where we’ve been, from the sagamen of the Saxons to the A-OK of the astronauts and well beyond.

And one for us Americans

She does a superb Minnesotan! 🙂

And on if you, like me, struggle to figure out what the natives are talking about in Britain. 🙂

And this might be useful when they tell you to sod off cause you speak better English than they do.

In any case, enjoy the day.

 

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