Getting to know you

I think we’ll lighten up a bit today, I was out most of yesterday, and didn’t get anything prepared, sometimes life gets in the way, doesn’t it? In any case, back in the forties, the average American GI, didn’t have much idea of what the Brits were like, and it seemed to the War Department (Yeah, when will we change the Department of Defense back to its proper name?) that they should prepare our guys a bit. They even got the Brits to help.

The Videos below were part of that effort. Enjoy.

 

 

 

And, of course,

 

 

A good effort, I think, by all hands. Still, 75 years later, we still get sideways every once in a while, but we usually manage to work it out with the cousins, and it’s one of the wonders of the world.

The Hysterical Left, and Neil Gorsuch

w1056-4I seem to have developed some form of flu. It’s rather distracting, so a short one today.

In any case, I think Melanie is on to quite a lot here. It was an instructive year, as I watched (and participated in) as Britain discovered the words of the American founders to urge on the Brexit forces, and then, in turn, support us as we elected Trump. It was indeed an Anglosphere effort.

 

I too was moved when Mrs. May said in Philadelphia what is so often said here. Britain (and especially England) and America have built the modern world in all its freedom. And what we are hearing now is what can only be described in Hollywood terms, “To crush your enemies — See them driven before you, and to hear the lamentation of their women!”

It’s not over, not by a long shot, but I think, on both sides of the pond, we have turned a corner, and at last conservatives are fighting back, not merely better managing the decline.

And yes, there is something about that English accent. At least for this American guy. 🙂

[Added] And speaking of Mrs. May, question time in the House was quite a scene. She increasingly reminds me of Maggie Thatcher (and that is the highest praise I can offer a British Prime Minister).


c3h1m-kvuae7_imThen there is the news we have been waiting, Trumps first pick for the Supreme Court. Well, one problem with Trump is overuse of superlatives, but Gorsuch is simply awesome. Probably as good as Scalia, and in some areas perhaps even better. As near as I can tell (not my field) there simply is no downside to him, heck he even looks the part. I can’t see the hook the Democrats can use to derail this, other than hysteria, of course. But I think America has had just about enough of that nonsense, and 2018 is coming. Here’s a sample from Judge Gorsuch.

…judges should instead strive (if humanly and so imperfect- ly) to apply the law as it is, focusing backward, not forward, and looking to text, structure, and history to decide what a reasonable reader at the time of the events in question would have understood the law to be— not to decide cases based on their own moral convictions or the policy consequences they believe might serve society best. As Justice Scalia put it, “[i]f you’re going to be a good and faithful judge, you have to resign yourself to the fact that you’re not always going to like the con- clusions you reach. If you like them all the time, you’re probably doing something wrong.”

For a lot of us, the Supreme Court had a lot to do with who we voted for, for President. I think our trust has been repaid. And since he’s only about 50, he may well be there for almost a generation. If so, he’ll do much to secure our legacy.

 

A Bit of American Leadership

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Sometimes that’s all it takes to change the world. Recently, Paul Bonecelli, wrote in The Federalist:

President-elect Trump’s nomination of Rex Tillerson is clear evidence that Trump wants to change U.S. foreign policy and its posture in the world. For him, arguably no other choice would do but of an outsider with a record of setting and achieving goals internationally.

That’s good, because the American people want a fundamental transformation of our foreign policy. They want an about-face in not just our policy but also our posture. Over the last eight years we have seen President Obama avoid conflicts whenever he could while an aggressor advanced its own interests (China). We have seen him reluctantly engage in conflicts but with no plan or intention to win (Iraq, Afghanistan, Syria, the Islamic State). We have also seen him make one-sided deals favoring our enemies in order to burnish his image with the Nobel and academic crowd (Iran, Cuba).

Americans have seen all this and the collateral damage that ensues: our erstwhile allies express doubt about our commitments to them in the face of our enemy’s aggression, and our enemies gather courage and leverage as they press toward their goals, which are always national and always strengthen the ruling cliques in these countries.

What have American goals been under Obama and Secretary of State John Kerry? Whatever the ill-defined international community thinks they should be, from war and peace to climate change to refugees to trade. Obama and Kerry have not defined and defended American interests first and then sought to convince allies and enemies to join or accommodate us, respectively. Rather, Obama and Kerry have accepted whatever our opponents and various international bodies want to offer us.

via Rex Tillerson Is The Change America Needs And Our Enemies Deserve

Yep, and it’s putting it very kindly as well. I note that in World War II, the American people never flinched, even as the casualties mounted towards the end of the war, in the horrific campaigns in the Ardennes, on Iwo, and Okinawa, nor would they have in the Invasion of Japan. But they did in Korea, in Vietnam, and now in the GWOT. I don’t think America changed all that much, through Vietnam, it was mostly the same people. It was that the government went about the whole war thing half-heartedly, without trying for a victory. And the last eight years have been even worse, as the Obama administration bobbed about like dismasted Hobie Cat instead of the once magnificent ship of state.

And that’s why Trump, and especially Tillerson. Like him or not (I do), he, like his boss, always fights his corner, and does it effectively, and he does it creatively, and more often than not, he has won. Did you see this, from WAPO, via Powerline

Chavez responded by nationalizing ExxonMobil’s considerable assets in the country, which the company valued at $10 billion. The losses were a big blow to Tillerson, who reportedly took the seizure as a personal affront.

Only Tillerson didn’t get mad, at least in public. He got even.

Guyana, one of the poorest countries in South America, adjoins Venezuela to the East. ExxonMobil got rights to explore for oil off Guyana’s coast, and in May 2015, the company made a stunning announcement:

In the deep blue waters 120 miles off Guyana’s coast, the company scored a major oil discovery: as much as 1.4 billion barrels of high-quality crude. Tillerson told company shareholders the well, Liza-1, was the largest oil find anywhere in the world that year.

For tiny Guyana (population 800,000), the continent’s only English-speaking country and one of its poorest, it was a fortune-changing event, certain to mark a “before and after” in a country long isolated by language and geography.

And now, Venezuela is starving in failure, and Guyana is getting rich. All because of American leadership. More is going to happen, too. And not just in South America.

If you recall, Britain help draft and voted for the execrable UN Resolution 2334, just a couple weeks ago. But then in a stunning reversal, PM May sent Kerry to the naughty step for attempting to interfere with internal Israeli politics, and turned what was supposed to be culmination of Obama’s anti-Israel policy – the so-called Paris peace talks into a farce. All because Trump agreed with the American people that one doesn’t send one’s best friend to the end of the queue, one supports them. And what’s even better? This is

I note that both the FTSE and the Dow are up.I doubt it’s coincidental.

Reagan and Thatcher redux? Unlikely, but it would be wise to at least let Trump take the oath first. But we are beginning to see a more congenial atmosphere in the world already. There will be setbacks, there will likely be trouble, for oxen will be gored, and there will be alarums in the night, and rumors of war. But, those are all things that will happen anyway, and it is better for the people of the world, as opposed to their rulers, for the Great Republic to shape events than to be shaped by them.

And so, we end with two truths.

  1. One more day until the inauguration. And look what Trump has already accomplished!
  2. Hillary Clinton will never be president.

Freedom Of Speech?

imagesMark Steyn writing in NRO‘s Corner the other day had some interesting things to say (as he usually does). one of the thing that the left seems to have a problem with is the “Goose and Gander Rule”, you know the one that says that what is sauce for the goose is also sauce for the gander.

I’m not a huge fan of Pamela Geller, at the risk of being called sexist, she’s a bit strident for my taste (and yes I’d say the same if she were a he, so stuff it) that emphatically does not make her wrong, it doesn’t make her right either, but her facts do.

And if she’s not exactly my cup of tea, she’s flat wonderful compared to say Anjem Choudray, who openly calles for the murder of the British PM.

So, of course, Choudray is welcome to spout his nonsensical venom all over the UK, while Ms. Geller is banned from telling the British the truth.

Here’s Mark.

Three snapshots of western liberty:

1) A few weeks ago, I wrote about a Canadian police department’s diversity enforcer attempt to shut down a Pamela Geller speech by getting her bounced from a Toronto synagogue. In Britain, the shut-up-he-explained crowd cut to the chase: They went to the (supposedly Conservative) Home Secretary, the ghastly Theresa May, and got Miss Geller and Robert Spencer banned from the entire country on the grounds that their presence in the United Kingdom would not be “conducive to the public good“.

By contrast, the presence of, say, Anjem Choudary, philosophical mentor of the Woolwich head hackers and a man who calls for the murder of the Prime Minister, is so “conducive to the public good” that British taxpayers subsidize him generously and provide a half-million-dollar home for him to live on. Mrs May’s Home Office has just admitted to the UK Muhhamed al-Arefe who advocates wife-beating. Perhaps Mr May will try out Imam al-Arefe’s expert advice on the beneficial effects of “light beating” on Theresa this weekend – or is spousal abuse only “conducive to the public good” of Muslim women?

The reflexive illiberalism of Britain’s so-called liberals – the urge to ban the debate rather than win it – is now so deeply ingrained they will soon be hungry for new victories. Nearly four centuries after Milton’s Areopagitica, freedom of speech is dead in England. In denying her charges access to dissenting ideas, Mrs May is inviting them to find alternative means of expression. No good will come from this.

Continue reading One Step Forawrd, Two Steps Back

Of course, Americans have funny attitudes, we are inclined to let everybody speak and take what all they say and see what makes sense compared with what we see around us. (You know, like assassinated soldiers and such) and figure out the truth from there. I suppose it makes a quieter society when you only allow one side to present its views, especially when that side calls for your death, and means it.

Freedom of Speech, you really should try it, Great Britain.

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