Charlie Gard: an Update

Charlie Gard, who was born in England with mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, is pictured in this undated family photo. The baby’s parent, Chris Gard and Connie Yates, have lost their legal battle to keep Charlie on life-support and seek treatment for his rare condition in the United States. (CNS photo/family handout, courtesy Featureworld) See ACADEMY-BABY-LIFE-SUPPORT June 29, 2017.

Well, I hope you enjoyed the interlude, of our traditional 4th of July posts. One of those times that there is little new to say, and I was pretty happy with the way I said it before.

The last few days, we have been celebrating these words, above all others,

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.

Apparently, the British, after all these years, still don’t agree.

There is was an update the other day from the Catholic Herald on the status of Charlie Gard. Charlie, you’ll likely remember, is the infant in London with mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, for which there is an experimental treatment in the United States (risky, but he has little to lose) and for which his parents have raised $1.3 million dollars with a go fund me. When they asked Great Ormond Street Hospital they were refused permission to take him to America, and so they sued all the way through the British courts and on to the European Court of Human Rights. All of which said no.

Here’s the start of that update.

Terminally ill Charlie Gard cannot be transferred to the Vatican’s children’s hospital for treatment, foreign secretary Boris Johnson has said.

Mr Johnson told his Italian counterpart, Angelino Alfano, legal reasons prevented Charlie being moved out of Great Ormond Street Hospital.

The president of the Vatican’s Bambino Gesù hospital had offered to take Charlie into their care after the European Court of Human Rights ruled doctors had the right to turn off his life support.

The BBC reports Mr Johnson said it was “right that decisions continued to be led by expert medical opinion, supported by the courts”.

The Prime Minister added some pabalum to the mix. The British government appears to be bound and determined to make sure this baby dies. I hope they enjoy explaining themselves to the one true Judge. Hell of a note for a Vicar’s daughter to take this stand.

But all is not quite lost yet.

And there is this.

 

What the whole sickening thing says to me is that in Britain like the rest of Europe, you, even if you’re a helpless baby, whose parents have found some possible help for, remain the property of the state, to be judicially murdered if it suits them.

Indeed we are!

One thing I love about the US Pro-Life movement is that it completely understands that the right to life is damned well the right to life, you may lose it through no fault of your own, or disease, or even because of something you did, but no one: no individual, no group, and no government has the right to take it, especially without your permission, or if you’re a child your parents.

We used to have a different word for that situation – it is called slavery.

Royston Allen wrote a poem called Freedom, it applies here

Freedom to give
Freedom to live
Freedom to question why

Freedom to walk
Freedom to talk
Freedom to live or to die […]

Freedom that’s mine
Freedom divine
Freedom no money can buy

#CHARLIEGARD #ISTANDWHITCHARLIEGARD

I note that as I write this, there are rumors circulating of a couple things connected with this, if they prove true, I will update.

Continuing the Mission

One year ago today, the day of the Brexit election, my post started with a quote from Thomas Paine, this one

THESE are the times that try men’s souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their country; but he that stands by it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph. What we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly: it is dearness only that gives every thing its value. Heaven knows how to put a proper price upon its goods; and it would be strange indeed if so celestial an article as FREEDOM should not be highly rated. Britain, with an army to enforce her tyranny, has declared that she has a right (not only to TAX) but “to BIND us in ALL CASES WHATSOEVER” and if being bound in that manner, is not slavery, then is there not such a thing as slavery upon earth. Even the expression is impious; for so unlimited a power can belong only to God.

It was true in the winter of 1776, and it was true last year, and it is still true. But the British, being the steadfast friends of freedom they have always been voted to leave the EU regardless. They’ve had a tough year. They will stay the course, I think. We’ll talk about that later, but just for comparison what happened in the year after we Americans declared independence? A quick overview from BritishBattles. com.

  • Battle of Long Island:The disastrous defeat of the Americans on 27th August 1776 leading to the loss of New York and the retreat to the Delaware River.
  • Battle of Harlem Heights:The skirmish on 16th September 1776 in northern New York island that restored the confidence of the American troops.
  • Battle of White Plains:The battle on 28th October 1776, leading to the American withdrawal to the Delaware River and the capture of Fort Washington by the British.
  • Battle of Fort Washington:The battle on 16th November 1776 that saw the American army forced off Manhattan Island and compelled to retreat to the Delaware River.
  • Battle of Trenton:George Washington’s iconic victory on 26th December 1776 over Colonel Rahl’s Hessian troops after crossing the frozen Delaware River; the battle that re-invigorated the American Revolution.
  • Battle of Princeton:The sequel on 3rd January 1777 to the successful Battle of Trenton: the two battles began the resurgence of the fortunes of the American Colonists in the Revolutionary War.
  • Battle of Ticonderoga 1777:The humiliating American abandonment of Fort Ticonderoga on 6th July 1777 to General Burgoyne’s British army.
  • Battle of Hubbardton:The hard-fought battle on 7th July 1777 in the forest south-east of Fort Ticonderoga.

The next winter will see the naked Continental Army starving at Valley Forge. We didn’t win our independence until 1783. I think the cousins will have a somewhat easier time, but their perils are also different. But amongst other things, they have us. As they started this trend, we picked it up last fall, not a little encouraged ourselves by Brexit.

Dan Hannan recapped the status the other day for us.

An unexpected defeat is always unsettling. I suspect many ConservativeHome readers were disoriented when two in five people voted for Jeremy Corbyn. We wondered how we had so misunderstood our own country; and that was following a vote that we had won.

In the days following the referendum, three false assertions became widespread. First, that Leave had won dishonestly. Second, that the country had become more racist. Third, that the 52 per cent had wrecked the economy.

The “liars” complaint is levelled the losers of every vote. Political campaigners are not trying to behave like neutral academics: they are trying to win. Both sides make good and bad arguments; both sides get to rebut each other’s claims.

Remain told us that a Leave vote would trigger a recession in 2016, cost every family more than £4000, cause Scotland to leave the UK and transplant the Calais refugee camp to Kent. In fact, Britain boomed after the vote, support for Scottish separatism plummeted and the Calais jungle was dismantled. […]

What of the idea that the referendum somehow unleashed xenophobia? The notion that the Leave vote had been “all about immigration” was endlessly repeated in Remain circles and on the BBC. In fact, every opinion poll showed that sovereignty had been the main motivator. Lord Ashcroft, for example, carried out a massive survey on the day, interviewing more than 12,000 people, and found that democratic control was by miles the biggest issue for Leavers (49 per cent of them named it as their main reason for backing Brexit), with immigration a distant second (which was cited by 33 per cent). But opinion polls, for many Remainers, were no match for anecdotes: “Well, one Leaver I spoke to said…” […]

Saddest of all, though, was the determination to believe that Britain would become poorer. To be fair, several experts thought there would be an instant crash. A week after the poll, 71 per cent of City economists surveyed by Bloomberg expected a recession in 2016; in fact, Britain grew faster in the six months after the vote than in the six months before it. Another survey, by Reuters, found that the consensus among economists was that unemployment would rise by 9,000 a month in the second half of last year; in fact, it fell by almost exactly that amount.

Well, almost none of that happened. In fact, Britain is booming.

From Euro-Guido:

UK manufacturers’ order books are at their highest level since August 1988. A CBI survey of 464 firms found a “broad-based improvement” in 13 out of 17 manufacturing sub-sectors, with food, drink and tobacco and chemicals leading the British-made boom. Meanwhile, export orders rocketed to a 22-year high. CBI Chief Economist Rain Newton-Smith said:

“Britain’s manufacturers are continuing to see demand for “Made in Britain” goods rise with the temperature. Total and export order books are at highs not seen for decades, and output growth remains robust.”

Outstanding!

Britain’s got some serious problems, many of them caused by uncontrolled immigration, and by a Conservative Party which seems to have lost its mooring in history. Not to mention a press that is at least as biased as the American one. So it ain’t all beer and skittles. But remember what Paine wrote, and hopefully they will get themselves back on track one way or another. Along that line, I was thinking the other day that Tom Jefferson and George Washington were miles prouder to be British (until arbitrary government forced them out) than Jeremy Corbyn ever dreamed of being. Sad for a prominent politician to owe his allegiance to something outside his country, mostly for his own aggrandizement. Right General Arnold? Was Peggy Shippen worth it?

Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more

London, Again

NBC News

Well, 30 + injured about 6 dead, it’s been done again, in London, this time. Well, we’ll pray for them all, the dead, the injured, and yes, our British cousins, in general. It’s what one does when one can’t do much else. This may be the saddest Tweet I’ve ever read, One should never see such a warning about one of the most civilized cities in the world, but we know it could easily have been New York, or Omaha, or a thousand others both here and there.

Thursday the British will vote in the General Election, they will be voting for their Member of Parliament, who will choose the next (or the same) Prime Minister. It’s considerably different from our system, but like ours, it has defended freedom for a long time.

Terrorism raises major and fundamental problems for a free society. How much of our freedom should we give up to our intelligence agencies who may well need that information to defeat this type of threat, but it is still none of the government’s business what you do and say, within very broad guidelines. All solutions are imperfect, I don’t have the answer if there is one, neither does President Trump, or Prime Minister May, or anybody else. The solution rests, I suspect, on the other half of our rights of freedom, our duty to defend it. Pay attention, and act as a responsible person would. That is your duty. And duty is a much-underused word, and yes, concept, in our countries these days.

That also lends point to why we, and Britain, all countries who are, or aspire to be, free must control their borders. There are very strict limits to the constraints we can impose on our citizenry, and very rightly so. But we can control who enters the country, and we must. This is a most insidious form of supporting terrorism, but support it is.

And I was quite impressed with the Metropolitan Police last night, both in the way they flooded the zone, and in the fact that within eight minutes of the attack kicking off, the perpetrators were assuming room temperature, and that in a country where the average cop is not armed. Heck, it would be good in any of the heavily armed US cities. Well done, guys and girls. They have also been doing a pretty good job of letting people know what is going on.

Donald Trump Tweeted this last night:

That’s nearly all any of us can do, at this point, but we are here, as always.

Soon, it will be time for free people to find a way to remove this scourge, and we will be there then, as well. For truly, as Burke wrote…

When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall one by one,

an unpitied sacrifice in a contemptible struggle.

Getting to know you

I think we’ll lighten up a bit today, I was out most of yesterday, and didn’t get anything prepared, sometimes life gets in the way, doesn’t it? In any case, back in the forties, the average American GI, didn’t have much idea of what the Brits were like, and it seemed to the War Department (Yeah, when will we change the Department of Defense back to its proper name?) that they should prepare our guys a bit. They even got the Brits to help.

The Videos below were part of that effort. Enjoy.

 

 

 

And, of course,

 

 

A good effort, I think, by all hands. Still, 75 years later, we still get sideways every once in a while, but we usually manage to work it out with the cousins, and it’s one of the wonders of the world.

The Hysterical Left, and Neil Gorsuch

w1056-4I seem to have developed some form of flu. It’s rather distracting, so a short one today.

In any case, I think Melanie is on to quite a lot here. It was an instructive year, as I watched (and participated in) as Britain discovered the words of the American founders to urge on the Brexit forces, and then, in turn, support us as we elected Trump. It was indeed an Anglosphere effort.

 

I too was moved when Mrs. May said in Philadelphia what is so often said here. Britain (and especially England) and America have built the modern world in all its freedom. And what we are hearing now is what can only be described in Hollywood terms, “To crush your enemies — See them driven before you, and to hear the lamentation of their women!”

It’s not over, not by a long shot, but I think, on both sides of the pond, we have turned a corner, and at last conservatives are fighting back, not merely better managing the decline.

And yes, there is something about that English accent. At least for this American guy. 🙂

[Added] And speaking of Mrs. May, question time in the House was quite a scene. She increasingly reminds me of Maggie Thatcher (and that is the highest praise I can offer a British Prime Minister).


c3h1m-kvuae7_imThen there is the news we have been waiting, Trumps first pick for the Supreme Court. Well, one problem with Trump is overuse of superlatives, but Gorsuch is simply awesome. Probably as good as Scalia, and in some areas perhaps even better. As near as I can tell (not my field) there simply is no downside to him, heck he even looks the part. I can’t see the hook the Democrats can use to derail this, other than hysteria, of course. But I think America has had just about enough of that nonsense, and 2018 is coming. Here’s a sample from Judge Gorsuch.

…judges should instead strive (if humanly and so imperfect- ly) to apply the law as it is, focusing backward, not forward, and looking to text, structure, and history to decide what a reasonable reader at the time of the events in question would have understood the law to be— not to decide cases based on their own moral convictions or the policy consequences they believe might serve society best. As Justice Scalia put it, “[i]f you’re going to be a good and faithful judge, you have to resign yourself to the fact that you’re not always going to like the con- clusions you reach. If you like them all the time, you’re probably doing something wrong.”

For a lot of us, the Supreme Court had a lot to do with who we voted for, for President. I think our trust has been repaid. And since he’s only about 50, he may well be there for almost a generation. If so, he’ll do much to secure our legacy.

 

A Bit of American Leadership

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Sometimes that’s all it takes to change the world. Recently, Paul Bonecelli, wrote in The Federalist:

President-elect Trump’s nomination of Rex Tillerson is clear evidence that Trump wants to change U.S. foreign policy and its posture in the world. For him, arguably no other choice would do but of an outsider with a record of setting and achieving goals internationally.

That’s good, because the American people want a fundamental transformation of our foreign policy. They want an about-face in not just our policy but also our posture. Over the last eight years we have seen President Obama avoid conflicts whenever he could while an aggressor advanced its own interests (China). We have seen him reluctantly engage in conflicts but with no plan or intention to win (Iraq, Afghanistan, Syria, the Islamic State). We have also seen him make one-sided deals favoring our enemies in order to burnish his image with the Nobel and academic crowd (Iran, Cuba).

Americans have seen all this and the collateral damage that ensues: our erstwhile allies express doubt about our commitments to them in the face of our enemy’s aggression, and our enemies gather courage and leverage as they press toward their goals, which are always national and always strengthen the ruling cliques in these countries.

What have American goals been under Obama and Secretary of State John Kerry? Whatever the ill-defined international community thinks they should be, from war and peace to climate change to refugees to trade. Obama and Kerry have not defined and defended American interests first and then sought to convince allies and enemies to join or accommodate us, respectively. Rather, Obama and Kerry have accepted whatever our opponents and various international bodies want to offer us.

via Rex Tillerson Is The Change America Needs And Our Enemies Deserve

Yep, and it’s putting it very kindly as well. I note that in World War II, the American people never flinched, even as the casualties mounted towards the end of the war, in the horrific campaigns in the Ardennes, on Iwo, and Okinawa, nor would they have in the Invasion of Japan. But they did in Korea, in Vietnam, and now in the GWOT. I don’t think America changed all that much, through Vietnam, it was mostly the same people. It was that the government went about the whole war thing half-heartedly, without trying for a victory. And the last eight years have been even worse, as the Obama administration bobbed about like dismasted Hobie Cat instead of the once magnificent ship of state.

And that’s why Trump, and especially Tillerson. Like him or not (I do), he, like his boss, always fights his corner, and does it effectively, and he does it creatively, and more often than not, he has won. Did you see this, from WAPO, via Powerline

Chavez responded by nationalizing ExxonMobil’s considerable assets in the country, which the company valued at $10 billion. The losses were a big blow to Tillerson, who reportedly took the seizure as a personal affront.

Only Tillerson didn’t get mad, at least in public. He got even.

Guyana, one of the poorest countries in South America, adjoins Venezuela to the East. ExxonMobil got rights to explore for oil off Guyana’s coast, and in May 2015, the company made a stunning announcement:

In the deep blue waters 120 miles off Guyana’s coast, the company scored a major oil discovery: as much as 1.4 billion barrels of high-quality crude. Tillerson told company shareholders the well, Liza-1, was the largest oil find anywhere in the world that year.

For tiny Guyana (population 800,000), the continent’s only English-speaking country and one of its poorest, it was a fortune-changing event, certain to mark a “before and after” in a country long isolated by language and geography.

And now, Venezuela is starving in failure, and Guyana is getting rich. All because of American leadership. More is going to happen, too. And not just in South America.

If you recall, Britain help draft and voted for the execrable UN Resolution 2334, just a couple weeks ago. But then in a stunning reversal, PM May sent Kerry to the naughty step for attempting to interfere with internal Israeli politics, and turned what was supposed to be culmination of Obama’s anti-Israel policy – the so-called Paris peace talks into a farce. All because Trump agreed with the American people that one doesn’t send one’s best friend to the end of the queue, one supports them. And what’s even better? This is

I note that both the FTSE and the Dow are up.I doubt it’s coincidental.

Reagan and Thatcher redux? Unlikely, but it would be wise to at least let Trump take the oath first. But we are beginning to see a more congenial atmosphere in the world already. There will be setbacks, there will likely be trouble, for oxen will be gored, and there will be alarums in the night, and rumors of war. But, those are all things that will happen anyway, and it is better for the people of the world, as opposed to their rulers, for the Great Republic to shape events than to be shaped by them.

And so, we end with two truths.

  1. One more day until the inauguration. And look what Trump has already accomplished!
  2. Hillary Clinton will never be president.
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