Better late than …

I have come late to politics. Before my retirement, I pretty much accepted whatever the local network stated. I’d catch a live address if I wasn’t working, read some articles on lunch breaks. I’m not apologizing; I am what I am – a late bloomer.

I’m reminded of the Bible story about the vineyard owner who hired workers at the beginning of the day and then a few more at the near end of the day. When the workday was over, the men who worked the entire day were paid according to the agreement; so were the later ones paid the same amount. Without the religious meaning, this tells us that it may not matter how soon or how late you get there, the important thing is that you arrive.

I read Solzhenitsyn in high school. When I – and the rest of the world – discovered Jordan Peterson, I read several of the books he recommended, including The Whisperers. Horrifying reading but necessary and should be mandatory. I read Nick Adams’s “Retaking America” and “You Will be Made to Care” by Erickson and Blankshaen. I read Rod Dreher’s Benedict Option, which was almost as impactful as the other books. I found smart people in Ben Shapiro, an Englishman with a long, deep memory for politics and history, and an American of encyclopedic knowledge. I developed a deep and meaningful relationship with a bishop and have been able to reconcile my political thoughts with what I hope is the will of God. I’ve done some studying since the old local news.

When I make a choice, I feel that not only have I made an informed decision but also a right decision. I know why I voted a certain way and why I will vote a certain way. I’ve found how to research judges whose names come up on local ballots. I gather as much information as possible on Schoolboard elections and their candidates – the importance of this is equal to a presidential election; those ‘little’ elections have the weight of what your children will learn and how America will fail or succeed in the future.

It doesn’t matter if you’re 80 and voting for the first time; it doesn’t matter if you’re 18 and voting for the first time. Or, for that matter, any age in between. Today I would tell the working person, while you’re driving your car, making supper for the family, folding laundry, or mowing the lawn – cell phones go everywhere; you can get podcasts, videos, audiobooks all right there on the same instrument you use to take pictures and make phone calls. Use it for something enriching, informing, varied, and paradigm-shifting. The truth is out there; it’s not going to come running up to you and slap you in the face. You have to seek it out. You have to ‘work’ for it. But just like your mom and dad always told you; anything worth having is worth working for. Religion and politics are right at the top of that list.

 

Samizdat

Samizdat is the name given to the underground passing of messages between dissidents in the old Soviet Union. Where everybody knew that Pravda was lying to them. Now it refers to all of us, bloggers, news aggregators, citizen journalists, even legal monitors the most famous being Judicial Watch.

It’s happened in the United States and Great Britain for the same reason it did in the Soviet Union, the legacy media almost never tells us the truth. And now, if you read these sources, you know more about what is happening than anybody at the NY Times or the Guardian, in the boardroom of any of our large corporations or especially broadcasters like CNN (coming to be better known as XiNN) or the BBC.

One of the reasons this grassroots (real ones) effort is so successful is simply because it bounces around the Anglosphere so quickly. You may well get a story from Australia first here, or on some British blogs before your local Australian paper deigns to cover it (if they ever do). Just as happened with that young, pregnant mother arrested and handcuffed in front of her kids for making a Facebook post.

Somebody else who has noticed is Jack Cashill writing at American Thinker. He says:

[Speaking of professional sports] The players all endorsed the BLM movement or appeared to. So did the sportscasters, the advertisers, the TV networks, Hollywood, Big Tech, the New York Times, the major magazines, and just about everyone with a prominent soapbox except for Fox News — and even Fox waffled.

Had the execs been paying attention, however, they would have understood that the same forces that supported the BLM protest also supported Hillary Clinton. In 2020, as in 2016, the major media’s collective control of the BLM messaging was subverted by the samizdat’s ability to record and distribute the facts on the ground. For the first time in history, ordinary people know more real news than do the people in control of America’s major newsrooms.

V.P. candidate Kamala Harris has yet to catch on. Allying herself with Kenosha’s Jacob Blake, Harris paid a visit to Blake’s family last week and spoke to Blake on the phone. “I mean, they’re an incredible family,” said Harris. “And what they’ve endured, and they just do it with such dignity and grace.”

Times readers applauded. They, like Harris, did not know what the samizdat knew. For starters, the dad of this incredible family, Jacob Blake, Sr., is likely no fan of the Times, having tweeted not too long ago, “The Jewish controlled media tells you what they want you to hear.” This was one of many anti-Semitic tweets from the old man.

The samizdat also know that the son from this incredible family, Jacob Jr., broke into the home of an ex-girlfriend, digitally raped her in front of a sleeping child, and stole her car keys and debit card. Police issued an open warrant for Blake’s arrest on sexual assault charges and a restraining order, the violation of which prompted a call to the police.

The day when Joseph Pulitzer could tell a photographer, “You provide the photographs and I’ll supply the war.” are long gone.

It’s most advanced in the United States, but Britain and Australia are quickly narrowing the gap. And those who know are getting angrier by the day. Yes, we have President Trump, who knows this, but they haven’t managed to find their equivalent yet. I predict they will.

Kipling was right though, and they should fear his words.

Eternal Lessons from History

It’s funny, somebody posts something interesting somewhere more or less out of the blue, and then others completely unrelated show up with something that builds on the first one. So it is here.

Our friend (and co-contributor at AATW) wrote on Sunday that modern history begins in the Peloponnesian War, as it does, saying this:

I am not the most conservative author here, but, unlike many others, in history I am so conservative as to consider that modernity begins with the classical period of Greece, particularly the aftermath of the Peloponnesian War. Although for much of history the rate of change has generally been very slow, especially compared with recent years, and although the cultures we see in the New Testament are, in many respects, far removed from our own, the New Testament has an immediacy about it that comes from its proximity to us on various basic levels.

The same is not necessarily true of the Old Testament, which reveals Bronze Age culture to us (and then goes into the Iron Age). This is a very different world and we have to work hard with ancient complementary sources to really understand it. This Bronze Age world is weird and exotic to our modern eyes.

He’s correct, of course. The Lutheran Study Bible specifies that the Books of History in the Old Testament are those from Josua to Esther. Esther is usually considered to be set in the reign of Xerxes I who ruled from  486 to 465 BC, so predating the Peloponnesian War. So it’s a fairly short break, but a decisive one.

So, I’m reading my way around the net this morning and what shows up from Michael McManus writing at The Conservative Woman but a quote from Thucydides, the historian of, and a victim himself, of that war from Book 3 of his history in paragraphs 82-85, edited by the link’s author:

‘The sufferings which the war inflicted upon the cities were many and terrible, such as have occurred and always will occur, human nature being what it is. War is a rough teacher. Words changed their meanings to accommodate the changed situation. Callous aggression came to be regarded as courage; prudence became weakness; moderation became timidity; willingness to consider evidence and look at all sides of a question became nervousness; fanatical thuggery and treachery became righteous actions. The ideological extremist was trusted while those who urged restraint became the enemy. If someone made a reasonable suggestion, his opponents sought to cover it up or distort its meaning.

‘Ambition, greed and the craving for power caused these evils and intensified the violence. Those in contention were full of fine words and noble expressions: some spoke of equality and political liberty for the people; others spoke of the safety, stability and trustworthiness of sound aristocratic government. Both sides stopped at nothing to get their way. No one wanted to listen to reason but sought fine arguments to justify vile deeds. Meanwhile, ordinary, sensible citizens were trapped between the two: even their quietness was taken as evidence of guilt.

‘The character of the Greeks went from bad to worse. The simple life of honour and decency was laughed at and society divided into hostile camps whose promises were no longer trusted. The less intelligent prospered: knowing their weaknesses and expecting to be defeated in debate they resorted to intimidation and violence. The more intelligent, foolishly confident that reason and evidence would prevail, were caught off-guard and vanquished. Those who were envious of their neighbours engaged in savage and pitiless actions. No longer restrained by convention and law, human nature showed itself to be ungovernable in its passionate disregard for justice, and its hatred of anything superior to itself.’

I think he’d feel right at home in our countries in 2020, don’t you?

And that is kind of the point, while the Old Testament feels exotic to us, we see the same motives there that Thucydides wrote about in ancient Greece, that the American Founders sought to guard against in our founding documents – now endangered, and that we see forthrightly in our governments and on our streets today. We somewhat facilely say that our founder’s sought to guard against Original Sin, well we are not wrong, for that is human nature, sometimes achieving amazing feats and goodness approaching the angels, and sometimes veritable ogres, destroying wantonly and with no less amazing cruelty.

And that is the genius of the English speaking people and especially the United States, to set the bad sides of our nature against our opponents’ bad sides to achieve lasting freedom. We need to guard our heritage fiercely.

Sunday Funnies; Land of Hope and Glory

Yes, a bit of cultural appropriation from the cousins, but I think if they read through to the end, they will happily forgive me.

By the way, from Second City Cop, this is an actual photo of the block where the mayor of Chicago, pictured above (I’m sorry) lives.

Not a photoshop

These might be, but I wouldn’t bet much.

Notice that, unlike California, RMS Titanic had electric lights

Doesn’t everyone do it this way

Do not set the flux capacitor to 2020

This sucks

Now for our cousins who, like us, lament that XiNN East has decided to remove the lyrics from the best part of “Last Night of the Proms”. Enjoy with us

By the way, this gentleman is 90 this week.

Our friend Alys sent this to us the other day, so I think she likes this version. I certainly do.

I’m going to toss an extra in here since it was originally written to tweak the noses of the powers that be

What a glorious version of “My Country is of Thee!”  🙂

 

And, of course

Big Surprise.

There are many talented and intelligent people in the world. America has many of them. The ‘Blog World’ has many of them, too. I’m one of the people who was blessed with neither talent nor intelligence but I was granted the gift of recognizing both in others.

I don’t have the long memory that a lot of the people I admire possess. I’m the sort of person who tends to take things that are happening now as, well, something that is happening now. Sometimes I can see it, but mostly I miss how what is happening now is really the result of things that have happened before now; often long before now. Which probably explains why the news can still shock and amaze me. Welcome to my world.

Netflix has had quite an influence on my knowledge level. Naturally, I don’t watch anything if it has the slightest scent of ‘narrative’. Three series on Netflix have filled in my ‘information gap’. They are West Wing, The Crown (I am a hopeless Anglophile – I love my cousins across the sea), and Criminal Minds.

West Wing ran from 1999 to 2006. I’ve learned about political campaigns and how they are run and why it takes so much money to run a campaign; that the Democrats have always been Leftists – and quite frank about it in this program; and that it’s a good thing we don’t have 24/7/365 coverage of what goes on in the Oval Office. This series has also shown me what my father meant when he referred to Democrats as ‘bleeding heart liberals’.

The Crown, which began in 2016 and is still in production (of course heaven only knows when the fourth season will be dropped to Netflix – the ‘virus’, doncha know). What a gold mine of historic information. There are things that simply can’t be tampered with because they are historical and actually happened and are verifiable so that’s quite impactful. A UK site that is my home away from home has commenters (bless them one and all – except the troll everyone loves to hate) that harken back to previous governments and the leaders thereof and The Crown puts the ‘face’ to the names I’ve only rarely heard about but had such incredible impact on that country. I thought it ironic that they had John Lithgow portraying Churchill but that’s just me.

Criminal Minds, airing from 2005 to 2020, was a head’s up for me. Aside from the horrors and sometimes graphic nature of the episodes, there’s a heap of background in the dialogs of the characters that could be spoken right now, today, that is absolutely relevant. Such as Seattle having always been the ‘hotbed’ for Leftist protesting; that the FBI has always been in the pockets of the rich; that politics is something that law enforcement has always had to try to work around, and why local police forces frown on ‘interference’ from the FBI.

Oh, yes; I’ve learned quite a bit about the world and about right here at home, watching these series. Big wake-up. Big surprise.

 

The View from England

On the 3rd of November this year, the US will hold what I believe to be the most important presidential election of our time. Over the last decade or so, times have indeed been-a-changing but not for the better. The left have picked up their pace, with more infringements on our civil liberties, further laws to divide our communities, and a vociferous hatred of the people and values that built our great countries – the United States and Britain. Over the last few months, we have seen our countries face lockdowns, which our leaders claim are to stop a virus, which is only affecting certain sections of our societies, and the people are constantly being forced fed a diet of fear spread predictably through a mainstream media directing their truths and backed up by a political class whose only aim is to take more power.

Throughout this period, we have seen the rise of the far left, in the Marxist group Black Lives Matter, which cares as much for black lives as the Democrats care for the future of their country, and the terrorist organisation, Antifa. Both groups’ aims are to cause chaos throughout the country, spreading fear within communities which they look to divide while tearing down the history, culture, and values of both countries and all the while making ridiculous demands like defunding the police, something which would enable the chaos to continue and spread. At any other time, both organisations would be ignored but they have the support of Democrats, in the States, and the left in our country which, unfortunately, includes our government, formerly known as the Conservative Party. It is a wretched state of affairs in both our countries and I’m hopeful that the cultural counter-revolution, wherever that may come from, starts sooner rather than later. Do I see the re-election of Trump as a way to move that on in the States? Sadly, no. Despite Trump being in charge, the horrific events we’ve seen in the last few months have been allowed to continue and the president has been able to do little about it. Whether that’s because it’s an election year and he’s reluctant to get involved or because Democrats have the mandate over their states, I don’t know. What I do know is that it’s pivotal for Trump to be elected, certainly from our perspective.

First off, because of Brexit. Biden was Obama’s vice president during his 2 terms in office and as we know, Obama stated that the UK would be at the back of the queue for any trade deals. If Biden was elected, I’d expect this message to remain. If anything, he would probably urge Britain to rethink its membership with the EU and with our useless leaders, we’d probably find ourselves pulled back in, despite the democratic mandate given by our people in 2016. Trump, on the other hand, values this country but he’s a businessman, at the end of the day, and he’ll negotiate hard for a deal that works for his country over any other. That’s good because at least we’ll get the opportunity to negotiate rather than being in a position where we’re shunted to the outer edges while being redirected back to Brussels. Biden might be favoured by our elite but many of our people won’t be too happy at seeing him in power, especially with Kamala Harris at his side. They won’t work for the interests of the American people at large and they certainly will do us no favours.

Secondly, because it’s important that a conservative remains in charge of the US. It’s also important that when the opportunity arises to re-elect governors, that chance is taken by the people of the US. The states that are seeing the most turmoil – rises in crime and unemployment – are Democrat-run states and I do hope the people suffering in those places recognise that their leaders have done nothing to help them, only exacerbate the issues. Electing conservatives will be a huge boon for the people who have watched the chaos ensue and businesses destroyed while their leaders have sat on their hands and done nothing.

Proper conservative leaders are few and far between across the world and with the globalists and quangos, like the UN, keen to alter the way we operate globally, it’s important that there is a pushback on many of their plans. Trump is not influenced by these bodies and has already removed his country from some of these groups, which act against the interests of not only the American people but many other countries too.

After watching, for the last few years, a government in this country abandon its conservative values and slide to the left, favouring positive discrimination and identity politics, which installed hate crime in our legislation and has allowed common purpose to take over our institutions, it makes me envious to see President Donald J Trump sit in the White House. I wish we had someone like him here. Someone who doesn’t pander to the left or thuggish organisations or to the media but someone with the balls to stand for his values.

You are in a very fortunate position and I hope that we will see, on the 4th of November, President Trump ready to take his place as your head of state for a further 4 years.

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