Sunday Funnies on Monday

There was a demonstration in London the other day. Here’s a picture.

Here’s a close up of one of the leaders.

There’s a reason I don’t watch anymore. In fact, the entire BBC is like this, including the news. Can you say CNN with a better accent?

Meanwhile over here.

Seven deadly sins, There’s an app for that

And finally, IDF soldier Orin Julie

Some from PowerLine, some from Ace‘s, some from other places that I can’t remember.

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Nikki Haley, Comedienne

Yeah, I overslept, hey it is Saturday, so here is Nikki Haley at the Al Smith dinner. Well worth your time.

 

She cleans up pretty nice too, as far as I’m concerned.

Democrats and Mobs (BIRM)

Steven Hayward over at PowerLine noticed something, well, so did I, and maybe you did too. The Democrats sure do love their mobs.

News item: Two GOP candidates assaulted in Minnesota.

News item: Antifa mob overruns Portland, and Democratic mayor stands aside. (And to think, I had dinner once with Ted Wheeler a few years ago, before he was elected mayor of Portland, and thought he was a sensible human being. Another case of misleading first impressions I guess.)

New item: Ricin sent to Sen. Susan Collins.

News item: Democrat assaults, critically injures Republican Senator in capitol.

Ok, that last one is from 1851, but it rather makes the point. Others could be added.

  • The New York Draft Riots during the Civil War

Not as clearly linked, but given the party’s history of racism, I’d guess there is some connection.

  • The East St. Louis riot in 1917
  • The Red Summer of 1919

And of course, the whole series in the 1960s culminating for a time at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago.

And Ferguson, and Baltimore – the list goes on.

And that’s just the high points.

Back when Abraham Lincoln was 28 years old, he gave what we know as his Lyceum Speech, in it, he said this.

But you are, perhaps, ready to ask, “What has this to do with the perpetuation of our political institutions?” I answer, it has much to do with it. Its direct consequences are, comparatively speaking, but a small evil; and much of its danger consists, in the proneness of our minds, to regard its direct, as its only consequences. Abstractly considered, the hanging of the gamblers at Vicksburg, was of but little consequence. They constitute a portion of population, that is worse than useless in any community; and their death, if no pernicious example be set by it, is never matter of reasonable regret with any one. If they were annually swept, from the stage of existence, by the plague or small pox, honest men would, perhaps, be much profited, by the operation. Similar too, is the correct reasoning, in regard to the burning of the negro at St. Louis. He had forfeited his life, by the perpetration of an outrageous murder, upon one of the most worthy and respectable citizens of the city; and had he not died as he did, he must have died by the sentence of the law, in a very short time afterwards. As to him alone, it was as well the way it was, as it could otherwise have been. But the example in either case, was fearful. When men take it in their heads today, to hang gamblers, or burn murderers, they should recollect, that, in the confusion usually attending such transactions, they will be as likely to hang or burn some one, who is neither a gambler nor a murderer as one who is; and that, acting upon the example they set, the mob of tomorrow, may, and probably will, hang or burn some of them, by the very same mistake. And not only so; the innocent, those who have ever set their faces against violations of law in every shape, alike with the guilty, fall victims to the ravages of mob law; and thus it goes on, step by step, till all the walls erected for the defence of the persons and property of individuals, are trodden down, and disregarded. But all this even, is not the full extent of the evil. By such examples, by instances of the perpetrators of such acts going unpunished, the lawless in spirit, are encouraged to become lawless in practice; and having been used to no restraint, but dread of punishment, they thus become, absolutely unrestrained. Having ever regarded Government as their deadliest bane, they make a jubilee of the suspension of its operations; and pray for nothing so much, as its total annihilation. . .

Thus, then, by the operation of this mobocratic spirit, which all must admit, is now abroad in the land, the strongest bulwark of any Government, and particularly of those constituted like ours, may effectually be broken down and destroyed—I mean the attachment of the People. Whenever this effect shall be produced among us; whenever the vicious portion of population shall be permitted to gather in bands of hundreds and thousands, and burn churches, ravage and rob provision stores, throw printing presses into rivers, shoot editors, and hang and burn obnoxious persons at pleasure, and with impunity; depend on it, this Government cannot last.

Hat tip to Steve (link above) for the speech as well. As Steve points out, it seems that even non-radical Democrats think the Constitution needs to be replaced (with their cause of the day, as near as I can figure) so the government not lasting might be considered, by them, as a feature, not a bug.

Well, The Duke of Wellington said of the French after Waterloo, “They came on in the same old way, and we stopped them in the same old way”. One hopes that it doesn’t come to whiffs of grapeshot and the rattle of musketry, but what must be done will be done. That oath says all enemies, foreign and domestic, no exemption for the Democratic Party.

In Federalist #10 James Madison reminds us,  “… democracies have ever been spectacles of turbulence and contention; have ever been found incompatible with personal security or rights of property; and have in general been as short in their lives as they have been violent in their deaths.” And that is exactly the point to the Constitution in this Republic.

Diverse Wonderful Things

I’ve got three articles, here, well I’ve got a lot more than that, but three is enough for today, none long enough for me to make a post about, but all quite interesting, so let’s combine them.


Well, that didn’t take long…

Davos just declared that America is great again.

The World Economic Forum, which hosts the annual conference of global elites in Switzerland, said on Tuesday that the United States is the most competitive economy in the world.

The U.S. has not held the number one spot since 2008, when the aftermath of the financial crisis and bungled recovery efforts left the U.S. economy limping.

“The United States, as one of the world’s great innovation powerhouses, is very well positioned in this new competitive landscape,” the Forum said in an article explaining its ranking. “It ranks first overall in the world in three of our twelve pillars; business dynamism, labour markets and financial system. It comes second in another two; innovation (behind Germany) and market size (behind China).”

From Breitbart. Amazing what can happen when you cut the strings holding Gulliver down, and that is an exact analogy for what Trump has done. If we are smart enough to stay the course, there is no telling what the world will look like in 2024, but America will be leading it.


Polls are not news, they are news filler.

Everything I need to know about polls I learned in Junior High

It’s funny how some episodes from your past stick in your memory, while more significant ones don’t.

In ninth grade, all students were asked to complete a written survey on the topic of alcohol and drugs. We were told that the survey was being conducted by a grad student at the local university.

Among my friends, this seemed like the perfect spoof. I don’t remember if I’d even tasted beer at the time, but according to my survey answers I was a frequent drinker who blacked out regularly. Drug use? Sure, why not: LSD, cocaine, pills. Heroin too, but no more frequently than once a month.

The induced paranoia of another crowd convinced them that “narcs” were really behind the survey. Answer honestly? Riiiight.

I’m sure the survey made a beautiful grad school paper, complete with line charts, bar graphs and R-squared factors.

But the data it was based on wasn’t worth ca-ca.

From Maley’s Energy Blog. Your mileage may differ, of course, but I bet it doesn’t. Not least because that is my exact experience as well. An anonymous poll is just asking for us to lie, it’s Walter Mitty time, to admit and/or brag about all those things that you know you’d never do, but wish people thought you did. Is there anyone, anywhere, who tells a pollster the truth? Frankly, I doubt it, although a fair number may come within shouting distance of it.


Mind games

The headline of this Washington Post article (paper edition) is “Warren dust-up shows Trump sway over Democratic contest.” A better title would substitute “minds” for “contest.”

Trump certainly got in Elizabeth Warren’s head. His constant “Pocahontas” references induced her to take a DNA test, publicize its results, and thereby make herself a source of greater ridicule than before.

Trump is also responsible for the fact that clownish Michael Avenatti is mentioned as a contender for nomination in 2020. Democrats seemed intrigued, for a while at least, by the prospect that he could get into Trump’s head the way Trump has been getting into theirs. (The Dems might want to revise this view after Avenatti’s performance during the Kavanaugh struggle and now that Avenatti’s frivolous suit against Trump resulted in his client having to pay the president’s legal fees).

From PowerLine. It’s true and obvious. Not only the Dems, but the so-called news media worldwide, and, I suspect, a goodly share of other country’s leadership, as well. It’s a hell of an advantage for him, and for the United States. Hardly anybody anywhere is acting anymore, they are reacting to what the US President is saying or doing. And since he speaks pretty closely to what (in my experience, anyway) the average American wants, it has put America in the ascendant, again.

That is the magic wand that Obama insisted didn’t exist – listening to John Q. Public, internalizing what he thinks and turn it into US policy because the people are, and always have been much smarter than the so-called elites in their bubble.

An Old-Fashioned Patriot

Some things don’t change, and the world is much better off for it. Such as:

Jake Tapper

@jaketapper

Q: Are you a Democrat?

SEC. MATTIS: You know, we’re all built on our formative experiences.

When I was 18, I joined the Marine Corps, and in the U.S. military we are proudly apolitical….

 

Jake Tapper

@jaketapper

2/ …By that, I mean that in our duties, we were brought up to obey the elected commander in chief, whoever that is. And we’ve seen, over those — since I was in the military longer than some of you have been alive, I have seen Republicans and Democrats come and go….

 

Jake Tapper

@jaketapper

3/… Where am I today? I’m a member of the president’s administration. And you have seen that President Trump’s military policies, security policies, reaping significant bipartisan support….

 

Jake Tapper

@jaketapper

4/… So my role…and I realize you all write about tension between this person and that, this administration and that party, and this sort of thing. But when you think 83 percent of the U.S. Congress voting the same way on an issue put forward by the Republican president…

 

Jake Tapper

@jaketapper

5/ … you can see that my portfolio is bipartisan by its very basis, and that is the protection of the United States. That’s what President Trump has told me to do, and I eagerly carry that out, alongside probably the most selfless young men and women…

 

Jake Tapper

@jaketapper

6/ … — not all young; some old men and women, too — civilian and military, Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines working together.
So that’s where I stand. That defines me.

 

Jake Tapper

@jaketapper

7/ Q: I don’t want to put too fine a point on it, but you haven’t registered Republican or Democrat. Is that what I’m hearing you say?

SEC. MATTIS: I’ve never registered for any political party.
###

It’s easy to forget sometimes as we all run in circles, screaming and shouting, but there are more important things than politics, or even Hollyweird.
One of them is the defense of the Republic, and down through the years, one of the marks of the US Military has been that it is apolitical, keeping its eyes on the eternal, God and the Constitution.
Obama tried, near as I can tell, to change that, to politicize the military as he did the other institutions, but I suspect he mostly failed, and Mattis shows us why. And old-fashioned, rock-ribbed, man of integrity. And the reason why Americans trust our military more than any other institution.
Hat tip to Rightscoop.

Law and Disorder in Portland

Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler

There was a story in The Washington Times last Sunday on the Antifa riots in Portland. It was rather interesting.

Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler came under fire over a viral video showing Antifa protesters blocking traffic and harassing drivers, but he says he supports the decision by police to watch from a distance without getting involved.

“I was appalled by what I saw in the video, but I support the Portland Police Bureau’s decision not to intervene,” he said at a Friday press conference. “This whole incident will be investigated.”

The video posted by journalist Andy C. Ngo showed protesters, including members of Antifa and Black Lives Matter, blocking an intersection and attempting to direct traffic at while officers on motorcycle watched from a block away.

I expect that we have all seen it multiple times by now. What we have now is the Mayor’s (He’s also the Police Commissioner) announcing Portland’s surrender to Antifa/BLM. Nothing more, nothing less.

“I’m willing to take criticism all day long from Fox News,” he said. “But I’m not willing to accept criticism from Fox News of the men and women of the Portland Police Bureau.”

Well, I saw the report on Fox news several times. I did not see any criticism of the individual police officers, which would indeed be inappropriate. They are required to follow orders. I did hear, and myself have, severe criticisms of the Portland Police Bureau, the Police Commissioner, and the Mayor. They have failed both the police force and the citizens of Portland.

The mayor argued that law enforcement is in a no-win situation.

“This is the story of Goldilocks and the two bears. The porridge is either too hot or it’s too cold,” Mr. Wheeler told reporters. “At any given moment in this city, the police are criticized for being heavy-handed and intervening too quickly, or they’re being criticized for being standoffish and not intervening quickly enough.”

Poor little snowflake leadership, I wonder if police morale in Portland is below periscope depth like it is in Chicago. I bet it is, with leadership like this.

Tell me again why we have police forces?

Sir Robert Peel, the founder (during the time the Duke of Wellington was Prime Minister) of the London Metropolitan Police, the first modern police force, after which all police forces in the English speaking world were patterned, had nine principles of policing. They are:

  1. To prevent crime and disorder, as an alternative to their repression by military force and severity of legal punishment.
  2. To recognize always that the power of the police to fulfill their functions and duties is dependent on public approval of their existence, actions and behavior, and on their ability to secure and maintain public respect.
  3. To recognize always that to secure and maintain the respect and approval of the public means also the securing of the willing cooperation of the public in the task of securing observance of laws.
  4. To recognize always that the extent to which the cooperation of the public can be secured diminishes proportionately the necessity of the use of physical force and compulsion for achieving police objectives.
  5. To seek and preserve public favor, not by pandering to public opinion, but by constantly demonstrating absolute impartial service to law, in complete independence of policy, and without regard to the justice or injustice of the substance of individual laws, by ready offering of individual service and friendship to all members of the public without regard to their wealth or social standing, by ready exercise of courtesy and friendly good humor, and by ready offering of individual sacrifice in protecting and preserving life.
  6. To use physical force only when the exercise of persuasion, advice and warning is found to be insufficient to obtain public cooperation to an extent necessary to secure observance of law or to restore order, and to use only the minimum degree of physical force which is necessary on any particular occasion for achieving a police objective.
  7. To maintain at all times a relationship with the public that gives reality to the historic tradition that the police are the public and that the public are the police, the police being only members of the public who are paid to give full-time attention to duties which are incumbent on every citizen in the interests of community welfare and existence.
  8. To recognize always the need for strict adherence to police-executive functions, and to refrain from even seeming to usurp the powers of the judiciary of avenging individuals or the State, and of authoritatively judging guilt and punishing the guilty.
  9. To recognize always that the test of police efficiency is the absence of crime and disorder, and not the visible evidence of police action in dealing with them.

I think Mayor/ Police Commissioner Wheeler would do well to review Principles 1, 5, and 9 for starters. At the rate he is going, the people are going to apply number 7 and take back the police power for themselves. Some call that vigilantism, but it is necessary when the police refuse to be the police.

And likely at that point, you will see the military take over because it has reached the point that only Napoleon’s cure will work. His command was to “Give them a whiff of grapeshot.” That’s the progression that the stupid Progressives Regressives have us on.

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