Jeg onsker dere alle, “GOD SYTTENDE MAI!”*

All across the upper Midwest today, and wherever else we have roamed, you’ll hear the phrase above. It’s important to us, it’s also a good reason to drink Aquavit, one of the few good things we got from the Swedes. You see, as all the Ole’s and Lena’s know, the 17th of May is Norwegian Constitution Day, celebrated here and at home as well.

Many people mistake it for Norwegian Independence day which it is not.

On May 17, 1814, after ratification by the national assembly organized by the independence movement on May 16, the new CONSTITUTION for NORWAY was signed. The reality that this CONSTITUTION came in context with a very strong movement in NORWAY for INDEPENDENCE from SWEDEN. Unable to gain international support forced NORWAY after a short war to negotiate with SWEDEN. NORWAY was allowed to keep its own CONSTITUTION, but had to accept the KING OF SWEDEN as its monarch. For more historical information and perspective, read, “Constitution of Norway” in Wikipedia.

So we were stuck with loyalty to the Swedish Crown until 1905. It was never all that popular but Norwegians being rather stolid we soldiered on, and in good time…

This meant that NORWAY was subservient to SWEDEN under the KING of SWEDEN. The vision of and movement for INDEPENDENCE continued and was AT LONG LAST brought to fruition on June 7, 1905 when, having revoked the Constitutional amendments which ended the “personal union” with the King of Sweden, the NORWEGIAN PARLIAMENT took action to create an INDEPENDENT NORWAY with its own KING. This is a very complicated and interesting process with democratic ideas and processes pressing the whole process.

NORWAY did gain its own KING! The Parliament invited Prince Carl of Denmark to become KING. Understanding the NORWEGIAN movement toward democracy, he said he would consider becoming the KING only after a REFERENDUM of the PEOPLE of NORWAY to vote on whether they wanted a REPUBLIC or a CONSTITUTIONAL MONARCHY.

The PEOPLE of NORWAY voted 79% for the CONSTITUTIONAL MONARCHY. Prince Carl accepted election as KING of NORWAY. He and his family came to NORWAY. He was the MORE popular when he chose the historic name of NORWEGIAN kings, “HAAKON” and became King Haakon VII of Norway. King Haakon VII took the OATH as monarch on November 25, 1905 – 2 days after he arrived in Norway from Denmark. King Haakon VII was crowned KING of NORWAY at NIDAROSDOMEN (the cathedral in Trondheim) on June 22, 1906. Again, there are numerous interesting facets of the whole process, so I encourage you to read more in Wikipedia, “Haakon VII of Norway.”

Excerpted from:

TODAY is SYTTENDE MAI, the Norwegian CONSTITUTION Day, NOT independence day!

I suppose I could add here that my mother’s family is from Trondheim, the ancient capital, while my father’s is from Oslo, the current capital.

Coat of Arms of Oslo

I read a story, which I believe to be true, that when during World War Two, King Haakon VII was holding court, in exile in Scotland, a young man, a member of the Resistance, who had been injured by the Germans and escaped, was brought to the King. At the door, he straightened up and despite grievous injuries to his leg, walked without a limp to the King. Afterward, he remarked that “A man does not limp while his legs are the same length”. Such is the Heritage we have carried down from the Sagamen of the Viking age. And such is our reverence for freedom, independence, and written constitutions. We waited 90 years for a King of our own, who says perseverance, and steadfastness doesn’t pay.

O Valdres,  O Valdres, thou home in our hearts.

For immigrant families, an ocean apart.

Your valleys and mountains with lofty peaks high,

The mem’ries we cherish tho’ years have gone by;

O Valdres, your beauty is seen by day’s light,

Queen of the Valleys, a beacon at night.

For you now, O Norge, our hands cross the sea,

We all join together in one family.

Our homeland forever, our homage we give,

From all distant shores wherever we live,

O Norge, you call us from all walk of life,

In peace, love and joy, our hearts now unite.

Gretchen Dokken-Hellie

* I wish YOU ALL, “Good 17th of May!”

Jeg onsker dere alle, “GOD SYTTENDE MAI!”*

Norsk flagAll across the upper Midwest today, and wherever else we have roamed, you’ll hear the phrase above. It’s important to us, it’s also a good reason to drink Aquavit, one of the few good things we got from the Swedes. You see, as all the Ole’s and Lena’s know, the 17th of May is Norwegian Constitution Day, celebrated here and at home as well.

Many people mistake it for Norwegian Independence day which it is not.

On May 17, 1814, after ratification by the national assembly organized by the independence movement on May 16, the new Constitution for Norway was signed. The reality that this Constitution came in context with a very strong movement in Norway for Independence from Sweden. Unable to gain international support forced  Norway after a short war to negotiate with Sweden.  Norway was allowed to keep its own Constitution, but had to accept the King of Sweden as its monarch. For more historical information and perspective, read, “Constitution of Norway” in Wikipedia.

So we were stuck with loyalty to the Swedish Crown until 1905. It was never all that popular but Norwegians being rather stolid, we soldiered on, and in good time…

This meant that  Norway was subservient to Sweden under the King of Sweden. The vision of and movement for Independence continued and was at long last brought to fruition on June 7, 1905 when, having revoked the Constitutional amendments which ended the “personal union” with the King of Sweden, the Norwegian Parliament took action to create an Independent  Norway with its own KING. This is a very complicated and interesting process with democratic ideas and processes pressing the whole process.

Norway did gain its own King! The Parliament invited Prince Carl of Denmark to become King. Understanding the Norwegian movement toward democracy, he said he would consider becoming the King only after a Referendum of the People of  Norway to vote on whether they wanted a Republic or a Constitutional Monarchy.

Coat of Arms of Trondheim

The PEOPLE of  Norway voted 79% for ththe Constitution. Prince Carl accepted election as KING of  Norway. He and his family came to  Norway. He was the MORE popular when he chose the historic name of Nowegian kings, “HAAKON” and became King Haakon VII of Norway. King Haakon VII took the OATH as monarch on November 25, 1905 – 2 days after he arrived in Norway from Denmark. King Haakon VII was crowned KING of  Norway at Nidarosdomen (the cathedral in Trondheim) on June 22, 1906.Excepted from:

Today is SYTTENDE MAI!

I suppose I could add here that my mother’s family is from Trondheim, the ancient capital while my father’s is from Oslo, the current capital.

Coat of Arms of Oslo

I read a story, which I believe to be true, that when during World War Two, King Haakon VII was holding court, in exile in Scotland, a young man, a member of the Resistance, who had been injured by the Germans and escaped, was brought to the King. At the door, he straightened up and despite grievous injuries to his leg, walked without a limp to the King. Afterward, he remarked that, “A man does not limp while his legs are the same length”. Such is the Heritage we have carried down from the Sagamen of the Viking age. And such is our reverence for freedom, independence, and written constitutions. We waited 90 years for a King of our own, who says perseverance, and steadfastness doesn’t pay.

O Valdres,  O Valdres, thou home in our hearts.

For immigrant families, an ocean apart.

Your valleys and mountains with lofty peaks high,

The mem’ries we cherish tho’ years have gone by;

O Valdres, your beauty is seen by day’s light,

Queen of the Valleys, a beacon at night.

For you now, O Norge, our hands cross the sea,

We all join together in one family.

Our homeland forever, our homage we give,

From all distant shores wherever we live,

O Norge, you call us from all walk of life,

In peace, love and joy, our hearts now unite.

Gretchen Dokken-Hellie

* I wish YOU ALL, “Good 17th of May!”

Jeg onsker dere alle, “GOD SYTTENDE MAI!”*

Norsk flagAll across the upper Midwest today, and wherever else we have roamed, you’ll hear the phrase above. It’s important to us, it’s also a good reason to drink Aquavit, one of the few good things we got from the Swedes. You see, as all the Ole’s and Lena’s know, the 17th of May is Norwegian Constitution Day, celebrated here and at home as well.

Many people mistake it for Norwegian Independence day which it is not.

On May 17, 1814, after ratification by the national assembly organized by the independence movement on May 16, the new Constitution for Norway was signed. The reality that this Constitution came in context with a very strong movement in Norway for Independence from Sweden. Unable to gain international support forced  Norway after a short war to negotiate with Sweden.  Norway was allowed to keep its own Constitution, but had to accept the King of Sweden as its monarch. For more historical information and perspective, read, “Constitution of Norway” in Wikipedia.

So we were stuck with loyalty to the Swedish Crown until 1905. It was never all that popular but Norwegians being rather stolid we soldiered on, and in good time…

This meant that  Norway was subservient to Sweden under the King of Sweden. The vision of and movement for Independence continued and was at long last brought to fruition on June 7, 1905 when, having revoked the Constitutional amendments which ended the “personal union” with the King of Sweden, the Norwegian Parliament took action to create an Independent  Norway with its own KING. This is a very complicated and interesting process with democratic ideas and processes pressing the whole process.

Norway did gain its own King! The Parliament invited Prince Carl of Denmark to become King. Understanding the Norwegian movement toward democracy, he said he would consider becoming the King only after a Referendum of the People of  Norway to vote on whether they wanted a Republic or a Constitutional Monarchy.

The PEOPLE of  Norway voted 79% for theConstitutiony. Prince Carl accepted election as KING of  Norway. He and his family came to  Norway. He was the MORE popular when he chose the historic name of Nowegian kings, “HAAKON” and became King Haakon VII of Norway. King Haakon VII took the OATH as monarch on November 25, 1905 – 2 days after he arrived in Norway from Denmark. King Haakon VII was crowned KING of  Norway at Nidarosdomen (the cathedral in Trondheim) on June 22, 1906.Excepted from:

Today is SYTTENDE MAI!

I suppose I could add here that my mother’s family is from Trondheim, the ancient capital, while my father’s is from Oslo, the current capital.

Coat of Arms of Oslo

I read a story, which I believe to be true, that when during World War Two, King Haakon VII was holding court, in exile in Scotland, a young man, a member of the Resistance, who had been injured by the Germans and escaped, was brought to the King. At the door, he straightened up and despite grievous injuries to his leg, walked without a limp to the King. Afterward he remarked that, “A man does not limp while his legs are the same length”. Such is the Heritage we have carried down from the Sagamen of the Viking age. And such is our reverence for freedom, independence, and written constitutions. We waited 90 years for a King of our own, who says perseverance, and steadfastness doesn’t pay.

O Valdres,  O Valdres, thou home in our hearts.

For immigrant families, an ocean apart.

Your valleys and mountains with lofty peaks high,

The mem’ries we cherish tho’ years have gone by;

O Valdres, your beauty is seen by day’s light,

Queen of the Valleys, a beacon at night.

For you now, O Norge, our hands cross the sea,

We all join together in one family.

Our homeland forever, our homage we give,

From all distant shores wherever we live,

O Norge, you call us from all walk of life,

In peace, love and joy, our hearts now unite.

Gretchen Dokken-Hellie

* I wish YOU ALL, “Good 17th of May!”

Value Streams

Value stream mapping is defined by Wikipedia as a lean manufacturing technique used to analyze and design the flow of materials and information required to bring a product or service to a consumer. At Toyota, where the technique originated, it is known as “material and information flow mapping”. It can be applied to nearly any value chain.”  While I’m no expert on Lean Management, I suspect a good part of it is formalized common sense. This isn’t a tutorial; on lean management anyway but, it does offer some insights, not readily apparent.

This is the current drought map for the US.

It’s a pretty ugly map.

Furthermore, if you look again at it, you’ll see that what is often called the corn belt is almost  all listed as D2 or higher. Why do I write about corn again? It’s the most American of crops. It’s native to the new world to start with, it’s good to eat, it makes good whiskey, it makes pretty reasonable fuel, and it can be used to make almost anything else. It is incredibly versatile, that’s why we grow and use so much of it.

We’re good at growing it too, when I was a kid in Indiana, a farmer was doing really well to harvest 60 bushels per acre. Now here, in Nebraska, 200 bushels per acre is routine. Think about that, cause it’s really amazing.

It seems like nearly every year we have a record crop, but not this year, I saw a report last week that this years crop will be the worst in six years. That’s going to echo through the economy, ranchers are already selling cattle early and some are starting to sell cows. Cows are where calves come from, as opposed to the calves that are raised for market, it can take years to replace good cows, so ranchers try very hard not to. This year they really haven’t got a choice. In addition, because the EPA mandates that ethanol be used in gasoline, fuel prices are going to go up, corn is used in many, many food products, and it’s also used as a feedstock in making plastic. Corn is a basic necessity to American life, It’s value stream touches each and every one of us, and most of the world as well. And its going to be a bad year.

It could be worse though, here in Nebraska a very high proportion of our corn is irrigated, it has to be to get a good crop. of the standard the market requires. So for the most part our crop will be pretty good, not as good, from what I hear and see, but pretty good. But corn during the peak growing season can use up to an inch of water a day, a center pivot irrigating a quarter section of land will pump about 4-600 gallons of water per minute, it will take about 24 hours at a minimum to put an inch of water on the crop.

Center Pivot Irrigation via USGS

So that’s close to ¾ million gallons of water in each of those circles in that picture in 24 hours, most of it’s pumped by electricity (sometimes diesel and natural gas are used) it can take anywhere from about 20 to 300 horsepower motors to run the pump. That takes a lot of energy.

So here’s a value stream for you. somewhere about 50-70% of Nebraska’s economy is directly or indirectly dependent on agriculture, inability to irrigate will cut that market by at least half, I’d call that severe, ‘dirty thirties’ severe or worse. Here’s another one, a lot less corn on the market and we’ve already talked about what’s already happening here.

How could that catastrophe happen? Easy, King Coal,you see we generate about 60% of our electricity with coal, we have nuclear and we have some wind and hydro but our base (the power we depend on) is coal and nuclear, mostly coal, and the administration and the EPA have declared war on coal. The rest of the corn belt, while not as irrigation dependent as we are, need  affordable electricity as much as we do, and you guys in the cities do too.

Think about this, we’ve had a drought this year, it’s also been pretty hot, how do you think your nice sealed office would be on a 102º day, without electricity, no computer either you realize, cel phone either once you run your battery down.  We’ve been lucky this year, we’ve had usage warnings and unscheduled outages but we’ve managed for the most part but, our coal plants are still running, for now. It’s possible to convert them to natural gas, although not cheaply, and the cost per KWH is about a third higher. Ready to have your light bill go up by 30%?

But there are other value streams involved here as well. I don’t know as much about them so I’m going to let the Lean Submariner tell you about them. He is a lean Six Sigma expert so he really knows what he’s talking about.

Here’s Mac:

It’s a “black” thing; you obviously don’t understand Mr. President 1

Growing up in Western Pennsylvania, I learned some lessons on how the economy works

It’s a black thing and that black thing is coal. Southwest Pennsylvania has produced coal for energy and steel as long as most folks can remember. The area was blessed with an overabundance of this material that literally comes right out of the ground and has provided generations of people with jobs for centuries.

John C. McPherson worked at the railroad in Boston PA

When you talk about helping the middle class, the economics of coal is at the heart and soul of this region. Immigrants of every type came here in the 1700-1800’s to dig holes in the ground to bring it to market. They risked their lives and their health but the results were nothing short of amazing. This nation that we helped to build (yes, we did build this) was fueled by the energy and materials we made using that energy. It wasn’t perfect by any means, but it did the job. We did the job.

But the current administration and their EPA cronies have made coal Public Enemy Number One. They are convinced that coal is an evil and insidious enemy that must be stopped. Obama even said that in his lead up to the election. He was going to make it so expensive to use coal, it would cease to be an effective energy source. I am willing to bet that since this state went Obama in the last election, the people here were either not paying attention or did not think he was serious.

He was.

The once vital economy of this country and especially this region has been the prime victim of his liberal and uninformed ideas. It has led to some interesting changes in the Mon Valley.

DSCF1484

But who is really affected by the closing and marginalizing of the mines? After all, its kind of ironic that the labor union led by Trumka would be the biggest loser in this attack on an American icon. Are there other victims?

Yes there are and the list is a lot bigger than you would suspect.

A picture says a thousand words.

The picture above is looking down on the Monongahela River near a small town called California. This was coal country. It all starts with those chunks of coal being dug from the ground by people and machines. Its dirty, it burns and gives off unwanted bi-products, it needs careful handling in large quantities and it vexes environmentalists who are willing to sacrifice an entire region at any cost. What it also represents is something called a Value Stream: Money for countless generations of Western Pennsylvanians and many more beyond the valleys.

First Value Stream: The Mines.

The miners were paid decent wages with benefits and health care plans secured by their unions. That money went to buy houses, cars, food, vacations, luxury items, educations for their children, clothes and other consumable items. Their communities benefitted from this through taxes, Churches benefitted from tithing and gifts, and all of the retail and service people benefitted by having paying customers. Retail stores and building supply companies grew and prospered from the wealth created by these miners. …

DSCF1461

Mac’s last paragraph is telling on how serious this is:

Last note: The valley still has local fairs and festivals this time of year. I went to one this afternoon and noticed the local democratic party had a little booth set up. This particular Township has been a died in the wool blue area for as long as anyone can remember. I walked by it and saw some literature for the local congressman and a few local issues near to their hearts. It wasn’t until I started to walk away until I realized something.

There was not one single Obama-Biden sign, poster, picture or sticker anywhere in sight. Not one. Oh, I know they were probably there, probably just below the table. What a difference four years makes.

Continue Reading It’s a “black” thing; you obviously don’t understand Mr. President.

Jeg onsker dere alle, “GOD SYTTENDE MAI!”*

All across the upper Midwest today, and wherever else we have roamed, you’ll hear the phrase above. It’s important to us, it’s also a good reason to drink Aquavit, one of the few good things we got from the Swedes. You see, as all the Ole’s and Lena’s know, the 17th of May is Norwegian Constitution Day, celebrated here and at home as well.

Many people mistake it for Norwegian Independence day which it is not.

On May 17, 1814, after ratification by the national assembly organized by the independence movement on May 16, the new CONSTITUTION for NORWAY was signed. The reality that this CONSTITUTION came in context with a very strong movement in NORWAY for INDEPENDENCE from SWEDEN. Unable to gain international support forced NORWAY after a short war to negotiate with SWEDEN. NORWAY was allowed to keep its own CONSTITUTION, but had to accept the KING OF SWEDEN as its monarch. For more historical information and perspective, read, “Constitution of Norway” in Wikipedia.

So we were stuck with loyalty to the Swedish Crown until 1905. It was never all that popular but Norwegians being rather stolid we soldiered on, and in good time…

This meant that NORWAY was subservient to SWEDEN under the KING of SWEDEN. The vision of and movement for INDEPENDENCE continued and was AT LONG LAST brought to fruition on June 7, 1905 when, having revoked the Constitutional amendments which ended the “personal union” with the King of Sweden, the NORWEGIAN PARLIAMENT took action to create an INDEPENDENT NORWAY with its own KING. This is a very complicated and interesting process with democratic ideas and processes pressing the whole process.

NORWAY did gain its own KING! The Parliament invited Prince Carl of Denmark to become KING. Understanding the NORWEGIAN movement toward democracy, he said he would consider becoming the KING only after a REFERENDUM of the PEOPLE of NORWAY to vote on whether they wanted a REPUBLIC or a CONSTITUTIONAL MONARCHY.

The PEOPLE of NORWAY voted 79% for the CONSTITUTIONAL MONARCHY. Prince Carl accepted election as KING of NORWAY. He and his family came to NORWAY. He was the MORE popular when he chose the historic name of NORWEGIAN kings, “HAAKON” and became King Haakon VII of Norway. King Haakon VII took the OATH as monarch on November 25, 1905 – 2 days after he arrived in Norway from Denmark. King Haakon VII was crowned KING of NORWAY at NIDAROSDOMEN (the cathedral in Trondheim) on June 22, 1906. Again, there are numerous interesting facets of the whole process, so I encourage you to read more in Wikipedia, “Haakon VII of Norway.”

Excepted from:

TODAY is SYTTENDE MAI, the Norwegian CONSTITUTION Day, NOT independence day!

I suppose I could add here that my mother’s family is from Trondheim, the ancient capital, while my father’s is from Oslo, the current capital.

Coat of Arms of Oslo

I read a story, which I believe to be true, that when during World War Two, King Haakon VII was holding court, in exile in Scotland, a young man, a member of the Resistance, who had been injured by the Germans and escaped, was brought to the King. At the door, he straightened up and despite grievous injuries to his leg, walked without a limp to the King. Afterward he remarked that, “A man does not limp while his legs are the same length”. Such is the Heritage we have carried down from the Sagamen of the Viking age. And such is our reverence for freedom, independence, and written constitutions. We waited 90 years for a King of our own, who says perseverance, and steadfastness doesn’t pay.

O Valdres,  O Valdres, thou home in our hearts.

For immigrant families, an ocean apart.

Your valleys and mountains with lofty peaks high,

The mem’ries we cherish tho’ years have gone by;

O Valdres, your beauty is seen by day’s light,

Queen of the Valleys, a beacon at night.

For you now, O Norge, our hands cross the sea,

We all join together in one family.

Our homeland forever, our homage we give,

From all distant shores wherever we live,

O Norge, you call us from all walk of life,

In peace, love and joy, our hearts now unite.

Gretchen Dokken-Hellie

* I wish YOU ALL, “Good 17th of May!”

Of Men (and Women) at Arms

Winchester Repeating Arms Co. Catalog No. 82, ...

Winchester Repeating Arms Co. Catalog No. 82, June-July 1921 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

WHICH GUN FOR HOME DEFENSE?

One question I get asked very frequently is “What kind of handgun should I get for home defense”. My answer is always the same: “I wouldn’t get a handgun for home defense.” There are a handful of reasons why a pistol just isn’t the brightest idea for protecting against a home invasion.

The best option for home defense is a tactical 12 gauge shotgun.

Why use a handgun when you can use a long gun?         

Any experienced shooter will tell you that they would rather bring a rifle to a gun fight then a handgun. In fact, a common saying with law enforcement is “I use my handgun to fight my way to a real gun”. They are referring to their M4 rifles and/or their shotguns.  There are several reasons why just about any long gun is the better option in a gun fight, but this article is about why a 12 gauge is the answer for home defense, so we will focus on that.

Sight radius

The longer the sight radius (the distance between the front and back sites) on the gun, the more accurately you are going to shoot it. A shotgun, having a significantly longer barrel is going to have a longer sight radius. Contrary to popular belief, it is possible to miss with a shotgun.  However, the longer barrel on the 12 gauge (as compared to a pistol) makes it far easier to accurately take aimed shots as well as to “point shoot”.

Continue reading WHICH GUN FOR HOME DEFENSE? | Packing Pretty. With a hattip to http://gds44.wordpress.com/2012/04/02/12353/

Do I need to say that I completely agree with the post. Although I still prefer my Trench gun. 12 Ga. 2 3/4, 20″ barrel, rifle sights, wooden stock so it can be used in clubbed musket mode, and not least a bayonet just in case. If you see it coming toward you, it’s an intimidating beast. My loads: 1 #4 birdshot,  3 #00 buck, the rest rifled slugs.

That’s my answer to with what, Here is Pat Buchanan’s as to why.

A Nation Arms Itself — For What?

“Law-abiding citizens in America used guns in self-defense 2.5 million times in 1993 (about 6,825 times per day), and actually shot and killed two and a half times as many criminals as police did (1,527 to 606). These self-defense shootings resulted in less than one-fifth as many incidents as police where an innocent person was mistakenly identified as a criminal (2 percent versus 11 percent).”

The figures tell the story. Along with rising incarceration rates, the proliferation of guns in the hands of the law-abiding has been a factor in the nation’s falling crime rate.

And that proliferation has accelerated under President Obama.

According to ammo.net, tax revenues from the sale of firearms and ammunition have gone up 48 percent since 2008, with Iowa, North Carolina and Utah registering revenue gains of over 100 percent.

On Black Friday, the day after Thanksgiving, there were 129,666 background checks of individuals seeking to buy a gun, the highest one-day search in history This exceeded by 32,000 the number of background checks by gun dealers on Black Friday 2010.

Background searches in December broke the all-time monthly record set in November, as 1,534,414 inquiries were made to the National Instant Criminal Background Check System about prospective gun-buyers.

Half a million inquiries came in the six days before Christmas.

Why are Americans arming themselves?

More and more citizens, says the National Rifle Association, fear that if or when they confront a threat to their family, lives or property, the police will not be there.

Reports of home invasions and flash mobs have firmed up the market for firearms. After the 1992 Los Angeles riot, when Californians found themselves defenseless in homes and shops, gun sales soared.

Others argue that a fear of new laws in an Obama second term, or even the possible confiscation of handguns, is driving sales.

Continue reading A Nation Arms Itself — For What?

 A warning though, if you’re not willing to practice, and if you’re not sure you’ll use it, you’re merely arming your enemy, so think first and practice, practice, practice. It’s fun, anyway.

Do note that these weapons are not very practical for even open carry, that’s handgun territory, and if you need range over about 25-50 yards you need a rifle but, that’s not the type of self-defense we are talking about here. This is what is called the “close quarter battle”, or CQB. This is the last resort kill or be killed phase and that’s the other reason for proficiency: If you have to think, you’ll lose; it has to be instinctive.

So there you have it, the why and with what.

This is a very interesting article on a woman’s journey from a full on case of gun-phobia to to happiness with her shotgun. You’ll enjoy it.

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